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Endometrial cancer incidence trends in Europe: underlying determinants and prospects for prevention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17026
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2005 May;14(5):1132-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2005
Author
Freddie Bray
Isabel Dos Santos Silva
Henrik Moller
Elisabete Weiderpass
Author Affiliation
Cancer Registry of Norway, Institute of Population-based Cancer Research, Montebello, N-0310 Oslo, Norway. freddie.bray@kreftregisteret.no
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2005 May;14(5):1132-42
Date
May-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Contraceptives, Oral - administration & dosage
Endometrial Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Geography
Hormone Replacement Therapy - adverse effects - utilization
Humans
Incidence
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Postmenopause
Premenopause
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
More than one in 20 female cancers in Europe are of the endometrium. Surveillance of incidence rates is imperative given the rapidly changing profile in the prevalence and distribution of the underlying determinants. This study presents an analysis of observed and age-period-cohort-modeled trends in 13 European countries. There were increasing trends among postmenopausal women in many Northern and Western countries. Denmark and possibly France and Switzerland were exceptions, with decreasing trends in postmenopausal women. In premenopausal and perimenopausal women, declines were observed in Northern and Western Europe, most evidently in Denmark, Sweden, and the United Kingdom, affecting consecutive generations born after 1925. These contrast with the increasing trends regardless of menopausal age in some Southern and Eastern European countries, particularly Slovakia and Slovenia. These observations provide evidence of changes in several established risk factors over time and have implications for possible primary prevention strategies. In postmenopausal women, changes in reproductive behavior and prevalence of overweight and obesity may partially account for the observed increases, as well as hormone replacement therapy use in certain countries. Combined oral contraceptive use may be responsible for the declines observed among women aged
PubMed ID
15894663 View in PubMed
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Geographic and temporal variations in cancer of the corpus uteri: incidence and mortality in pre- and postmenopausal women in Europe.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17036
Source
Int J Cancer. 2005 Oct 20;117(1):123-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-20-2005
Author
Freddie Bray
Anja H Loos
Mariet Oostindier
Elisabete Weiderpass
Author Affiliation
Non-communicable Disease Epidemiology Group, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France. freddie.bray@kreftregisteret.no
Source
Int J Cancer. 2005 Oct 20;117(1):123-31
Date
Oct-20-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Geography
Humans
Incidence
Middle Aged
Postmenopause
Premenopause
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Uterine Neoplasms - mortality
Abstract
Corpus uteri cancer is the fourth most common neoplasm in women in Europe and the tenth most common cause of cancer death. We examined geographic and temporal variations in corpus uteri cancer incidence and mortality rates in the age groups 25-49 and 50-74 in 22 European countries. The disease is considerably less common in premenopausal women, with incidence and mortality rates decreasing throughout Europe and mortality declines more marked in western and southern European countries. Incidence rates among postmenopausal women are highest in the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Sweden and Slovenia and lowest in France and the United Kingdom. Increasing incidence trends in this age group are observed in the Nordic countries (except Denmark) and in the United Kingdom. Some increases are also seen in eastern (Slovakia) and southern Europe (Spain and Slovenia), while relatively stable or modestly decreasing trends are observed in Italy and most western European countries. Postmenopausal mortality rates are systematically higher in eastern Europe, with death rates in the Ukraine, Latvia, Czech Republic, Russia and Belarus 2-3 times those seen in western Europe. Declining mortality trends are seen in most populations, though in certain Eastern European countries, the declines began rather recently, during the 1980s. In Belarus and Russia, recent postmenopausal death rates are stable or increasing. The rates are adjusted for misclassification of uterine cancer deaths but remain unadjusted for hysterectomy, and where there is an apparent levelling off of incidence or mortality rates recently, rising prevalence of hysterectomy cannot be discounted as an explanation. However, the trends by age group can be viewed in light of several established risk factors for endometrial cancer that are highly prevalent and most likely changing with time. These are discussed, as are the prospects for preventing the disease.
PubMed ID
15880435 View in PubMed
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Incidence trends of adenocarcinoma of the cervix in 13 European countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16749
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2005 Sep;14(9):2191-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2005
Author
Freddie Bray
Bendix Carstensen
Henrik Møller
Marco Zappa
Maja Primic Zakelj
Gill Lawrence
Matti Hakama
Elisabete Weiderpass
Author Affiliation
Cancer Registry of Norway, Montebello, Oslo. freddie.bray@kreftregisteret.no
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2005 Sep;14(9):2191-9
Date
Sep-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology
Adult
Aged
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Papillomavirus Infections - complications
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology
Abstract
Rapid increases in cervical adenocarcinoma incidence have been observed in Western countries in recent decades. Postulated explanations include an increasing specificity of subtype-the capability to diagnose the disease, an inability of cytologic screening to reduce adenocarcinoma, and heterogeneity in cofactors related to persistent human papillomavirus infection. This study examines the possible contribution of these factors in relation with trends observed in Europe. Age-period-cohort models were fitted to cervical adenocarcinoma incidence trends in women ages /=3% in Finland, Slovakia, and Slovenia. The increases first affected generations born in the early 1930s through the mid-1940s, with risk invariably higher in women born in the mid-1960s relative to those born 20 years earlier. The magnitude of this risk ratio varied considerably from around 7 in Slovenia to almost unity in France. Declines in period-specific risk were observed in United Kingdom, Denmark, and Sweden, primarily among women ages >30. Whereas increasing specificity of subtype with time may be responsible for some of the increases in several countries, the changing distribution and prevalence of persistent infection with high-risk human papillomavirus types, alongside an inability to detect cervical adenocarcinoma within screening programs, would accord with the temporal profile observed in Europe. The homogeneity of trends in adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma in birth cohort is consistent with the notion that they share a similar etiology irrespective of the differential capability of screen detection. Screening may have had at least some impact in reducing cervical adenocarcinoma incidence in several countries during the 1990s.
PubMed ID
16172231 View in PubMed
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International lung cancer trends by histologic type: male:female differences diminishing and adenocarcinoma rates rising.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17015
Source
Int J Cancer. 2005 Nov 1;117(2):294-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1-2005
Author
Susan S Devesa
Freddie Bray
A Paloma Vizcaino
D Max Parkin
Author Affiliation
Biostatistics Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. devesas@exchange.nih.gov
Source
Int J Cancer. 2005 Nov 1;117(2):294-9
Date
Nov-1-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology
Adenoma - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Small Cell - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology
Comparative Study
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Lung Neoplasms - classification - epidemiology
Male
North America - epidemiology
Prevalence
Sex Characteristics
Abstract
Lung cancer rates have peaked among men in many areas of the world, but rates among women continue to rise. Most lung cancers are squamous cell carcinoma, small cell carcinoma, or adenocarcinoma; trends vary according to type. We compiled population-based morphology-specific incidence data from registries contributing to the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) databases. Unspecified cancers and carcinomas were reallocated based on a registry, time period, sex and age group-specific basis. Where available, data from several registries within a country were pooled for analysis. Rates per 100,000 person-years for 1980-1982 to 1995-1997 were age-adjusted by the direct method using the world standard. Squamous cell carcinoma rates among males declined 30% or more in North America and some European countries while changing less dramatically in other areas; small cell carcinoma rates decreased less rapidly. Squamous and small cell carcinoma rates among females generally rose, with the increases especially pronounced in the Netherlands and Norway. In contrast, adenocarcinoma rates rose among males and females in virtually all areas, with the increases among males exceeding 50% in many areas of Europe; among females, rates also rose rapidly and more than doubled in Norway, Italy and France. Rates of all lung cancer types among women and adenocarcinoma among men continue to rise despite declining cigarette use in many Western countries and shifts to filtered/low-tar cigarettes. Renewed efforts toward cessation and prevention are mandatory to curb the prevalence of cigarette smoking and to reduce lung cancer rates eventually.
PubMed ID
15900604 View in PubMed
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Ovarian cancer in Europe: Cross-sectional trends in incidence and mortality in 28 countries, 1953-2000.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17416
Source
Int J Cancer. 2005 Mar 1;113(6):977-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1-2005
Author
Freddie Bray
Anja Helena Loos
Sandro Tognazzo
Carlo La Vecchia
Author Affiliation
Descriptive Epidemiology Group, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France. bray@iarc.fr
Source
Int J Cancer. 2005 Mar 1;113(6):977-90
Date
Mar-1-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Cross-Sectional Studies
Europe - epidemiology
European Union
Female
Geography
Humans
Incidence
Ovarian Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
We have considered trends in incidence and mortality in 28 European countries using incidence data from successive volumes of Cancer Incidence in Five Continents and mortality from the WHO database. Countries with the highest rates in the early 1960s included the Nordic countries, Austria, Germany and the United Kingdom, but trends in these areas have tended to decline over recent calendar periods, particularly with regard to mortality. Southern European countries showed upward trends, at least until the early 1980s for France and Italy. Likewise, in most central and eastern European countries, ovarian cancer incidence and mortality rates were originally relatively low, but tended to rise over time. Falls in mortality, but not in incidence, over recent years were observed in the Czech Republic and Hungary. In several countries, mainly in northern Europe, trends were more favorable at younger age (25-49 years) than in the subsequent age groups. Thus, recent trends in ovarian cancer have led to a leveling of rates across various areas of the continent, although a 2.5-fold variation was still observed in the late 1990s between the highest mortality rate of 9.3/100,000 in Denmark and the lowest one of 3.6 in Portugal. These patterns should be viewed in the light of an observed reduction in parity, mainly in southern and eastern Europe, and the spread of oral contraceptive use, mainly in northern Europe, since these are the best recognized protective factors with regard to ovarian carcinogenesis. The declining mortality trends can also in part be ascribed to improvements in treatment.
Notes
Comment In: Nat Clin Pract Oncol. 2005 Jun;2(6):286-716264981
PubMed ID
15505879 View in PubMed
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Pleural mesothelioma incidence in Europe: evidence of some deceleration in the increasing trends.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18033
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2003 Oct;14(8):791-803
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2003
Author
Fabio Montanaro
Freddie Bray
Valerio Gennaro
Enzo Merler
Jerzy E Tyczynski
Donald Maxwell Parkin
Marija Strnad
Marie Jechov'a
Hans H Storm
Tiiu Aareleid
Timo Hakulinen
Michel Velten
Hacina Lef'evre
Arlette Danzon
Antoine Buemi
Jean-Pierre Daur'es
François Ménégoz
Nicole Raverdy
Martine Sauvage
Hartwig Ziegler
Harry Comber
Eugenio Paci
Marina Vercelli
Vincenzo De Lisi
Rosario Tumino
Roberto Zanetti
Franco Berrino
Giorgio Stanta
Frøydis Langmark
Jadwiga Rachtan
Ryszard Mezyk
Jerzy Blaszczyk
Plesko Ivan
Maja Primic-Zakelj
Alvaro Cañada Martínez
Isabel Izarzugaza
Joan Borràs
Carmen Martínez Garcia
Isabel Garau
Navarro Carmen Sánchez
Ardanaz Aicua
Lotti Barlow
Joachim Torhorst
Christine Bouchardy
Fabio Levi
Thomas Fisch
Nicole Probst
Otto Visser
Mike Quinn
Anna Gavin
David Brewster
Marica Mikov
Author Affiliation
Mesothelioma Registry of Liguria, Unit of Environmental Epidemiology and Applied Biostatistics, National Cancer Research Institute (IST), Genova, Italy. fabio.montanaro@ti.ch
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2003 Oct;14(8):791-803
Date
Oct-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asbestos
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Europe - epidemiology
Forecasting
Humans
Incidence
Linear Models
Mesothelioma - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Pleural Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To summarize the geographical and temporal variations in incidence of pleural mesothelioma in Europe, using the extensive data available from European general cancer registries, and consider these in light of recent trends in asbestos extraction, use and import in European countries. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The data were extracted from the European Cancer Incidence and Mortality database (EUROCIM). The inclusion criteria was acceptance in Volume VII of Cancer Incidence in Five Continents. Truncated age-standardized rates per 100,000 for the ages 40-74 were used to summarise recent geographical variations. Standardized rate ratios and 95% confidence intervals for the periods 1986-1990 and 1991-1995 were compared to assess geographical variations in risk. To investigate changes in the magnitude of most recent trends, regression models fitted to the latest available 10-year period (1988-1997) were compared with trends in the previous decade. Fitted rates in younger (40-64) and older adults (65-74) in the most recent period were also compared. RESULTS: There was a great deal of geographical variation in the risk of mesothelioma, annual rates ranging from around 8 per 100,000 in Scotland, England and The Netherlands, to lower than 1 per 100,000 in Spain (0.96), Estonia (0.85), Poland (0.85) and Yugoslavia, Vojvodina (0.56) among men. The rank of the rates for women was similar to that observed for men, although rates were considerably lower. Between 1978 and 1987, rates in men significantly increased in all countries (excepting Denmark). In the following 10 years, there was a deceleration in trend, and a significant increase was detectable only in England and France. In addition, the magnitude of recent trends in younger men was generally lower than those estimated for older men, in both national and regional cancer registry settings. CONCLUSIONS: While mesothelioma incidence rates are still rising in Europe, a deceleration has started in some countries. A decrease may begin in the next few years in certain European populations considering the deceleration of observed trends in mesothelioma and asbestos exposure, as well as the recent ban on its use.
Notes
Erratum In: Cancer Causes Control. 2004 Feb;15(1):103
PubMed ID
14674744 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.