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Factors Beyond the Language Barrier in Providing Health Care to Immigrant Patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290461
Source
Med Arch. 2016 Feb; 70(1):61-5
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Nabi Fatahi
Ferid Krupic
Author Affiliation
Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Med Arch. 2016 Feb; 70(1):61-5
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Communication Barriers
Delivery of Health Care - ethnology
Emigrants and Immigrants - statistics & numerical data
Europe
Female
Focus Groups
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Healthcare Disparities - ethnology
Humans
Iraq
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology
Social Perception
Sweden - ethnology
Abstract
Due to the enormous migration as the result of war and disasters during the last decades, health systems in Europe are faced with various cultural traditions and both healthcare systems and healthcare professionals are challenged by human rights and values. In order to minimize difficulties in providing healthcare services to patients with different cultural backgrounds, cultural competence healthcare professionals are needed.
Four focus group interviews, were conducted with Kurdish immigrants in Scandinavian countries (N=26). The majority were males (n=18) aged between 33-61 years (M= 51.6 years) and a few were (n=8) females aged 41-63 years (M=50.7 years). The data were analyzed by using qualitative content analysis method.
According to the study results participants experienced that diversities both in culture and healthcare routines create a number of difficulties regarding contact with healthcare services. Though culture related aspects influenced the process of all contact with health care services, the obstacles were more obvious in the case of psychological issues. The results of the study showed that cultural diversities were an obvious reason for immigrants' attitudes regarding healthcare services in resettlement countries.
The results of the study revealed a number of difficulties beyond linguistic problems regarding immigrants' contact with healthcare services in Scandinavian countries. Problems were rooted both in diversities in healthcare services and cultural aspects. Immigrants' views of healthcare systems and healthcare professionals' approach in providing healthcare were some of the problems mentioned.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26980935 View in PubMed
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Socioeconomic differences in children's growth trajectories from infancy to early adulthood: evidence from four European countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290973
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2017 Oct; 71(10):981-989
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-2017
Author
Cathal McCrory
Neil O'Leary
Silvia Fraga
Ana Isabel Ribeiro
Henrique Barros
Noora Kartiosuo
Olli Raitakari
Mika Kivimäki
Paolo Vineis
Richard Layte
Author Affiliation
The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2017 Oct; 71(10):981-989
Date
Oct-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Body Height
Child
Child Development
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Educational Status
Europe
Female
Finland
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Ireland
Male
Portugal
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
United Kingdom
Young Adult
Abstract
Height is regarded as a marker of early-life illness, adversity, nutrition and psychosocial stress, but the extent to which differences in height are determined by early-life socioeconomic circumstances, particularly in contemporary populations, is unclear. This study examined socioeconomic differences in children's height trajectories from birth through to 21 years of age in four European countries.
Data were from six prospective cohort studies-Generation XXI, Growing Up in Ireland (infant and child cohorts), Millennium Cohort Study, EPITeen and Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study-comprising a total of 49?492 children with growth measured repeatedly from 1980 to 2014. We modelled differences in children's growth trajectories over time by maternal educational level using hierarchical models with fixed and random components for each cohort study.
Across most cohorts at practically all ages, children from lower educated mothers were shorter on average. The gradient in height was consistently observed at 3 years of age with the difference in expected height between maternal education groups ranging between -0.55 and -1.53?cm for boys and -0.42 to -1.50?cm for girls across the different studies and widening across childhood. The height deficit persists into adolescence and early adulthood. By age 21, boys from primary educated maternal backgrounds lag the tertiary educated by -0.67?cm (Portugal) and -2.15?cm (Finland). The comparable figures for girls were -2.49?cm (Portugal) and -2.93?cm (Finland).
Significant differences in children's height by maternal education persist in modern child populations in Europe.
PubMed ID
28798151 View in PubMed
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A randomized comparison of continuous vs. intermittent infliximab maintenance regimens over 1 year in the treatment of moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166607
Source
J Am Acad Dermatol. 2007 Jan;56(1):31.e1-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
Alan Menter
Steven R Feldman
Gerald D Weinstein
Kim Papp
Robert Evans
Cynthia Guzzo
Shu Li
Lisa T Dooley
Cynthia Arnold
Alice B Gottlieb
Author Affiliation
Division of Dermatology, Baylor University Medical Center, UT Southwestern Medical School, 5310 Harvest Hill Rd, Ste 260, Dallas, TX 75230, USA. amderm@gmail.com
Source
J Am Acad Dermatol. 2007 Jan;56(1):31.e1-15
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antibodies, Monoclonal - administration & dosage - adverse effects - immunology - pharmacokinetics - therapeutic use
Arthritis, Psoriatic - drug therapy
Canada
Cross-Over Studies
Double-Blind Method
Drug Administration Schedule
Europe
Female
Humans
Immunosuppressive Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects - immunology - pharmacokinetics - therapeutic use
Infusions, Intravenous
Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic - chemically induced - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Patients - psychology
Psoriasis - drug therapy - psychology
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Severity of Illness Index
Treatment Outcome
Tuberculosis - epidemiology - etiology
United States
Abstract
Previous studies of infliximab in psoriasis have demonstrated rapid improvement with induction therapy and sustained response with regularly administered maintenance therapy.
The efficacy and safety of continuous (every-8-week) and intermittent (as-needed) maintenance regimens were compared.
Patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis (n = 835) were randomized to induction therapy (weeks 0, 2, and 6) with infliximab 3 mg/kg or 5 mg/kg or placebo. Infliximab-treated patients were randomized again at week 14 to continuous or intermittent maintenance regimens at their induction dose.
At week 10, 75.5% and 70.3% of patients in the infliximab 5 mg/kg and 3 mg/kg groups, respectively, achieved PASI 75; 45.2% and 37.1% achieved PASI 90 (vs 1.9% [PASI 75] and 0.5% [PASI 90] for placebo; P 1 year) maintenance therapy and further study of infliximab serum concentrations over this period, in both PASI 75 responders and non-responders, would be preferable.
Through week 50, response was best maintained with continuous infliximab therapy. Infliximab was generally well-tolerated in most patients.
PubMed ID
17097378 View in PubMed
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Comparing two measures of quality of life for children with haemophilia: the CHO-KLAT and the Haemo-QoL.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166749
Source
Haemophilia. 2006 Nov;12(6):643-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
C S Bradley
M. Bullinger
P J McCusker
C D Wakefield
V S Blanchette
N L Young
Author Affiliation
Department of Rehabilitation Services, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada. catharine.bradley@sickkids.ca
Source
Haemophilia. 2006 Nov;12(6):643-53
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Health status
Hemophilia A - psychology
Humans
Male
Quality of Life
Questionnaires - standards
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
Disease-specific measures of quality of life (QoL) for children with haemophilia are now available for use in clinical studies [Haemophilia, 10, 2004, 9-16]. One of these measures, the Canadian Haemophilia Outcomes - Kids' Life Assessment Tool (CHO-KLAT), was developed in Canada with emphasis on the perspectives of children [Pediatr Blood Cancer, 47, 2006, 305-11; Haemophilia, 10, 2004, 34-43]. Another, the Haemo-QoL, was developed in Europe, with emphasis on the perspectives of clinicians [Haemophilia, 8, 2002, 47-54; Haemophilia, 10, 2004, 17-25]. While these two measures are unique and independent, researchers from both studies were collaboratively linked throughout development and testing. This study presents the results of a joint assessment of the two measures with respect to their strengths, limitations and unique contributions. The primary questions addressed were: 1 What is the relationship between the CHO-KLAT and the Haemo-QoL in terms of summary scores and item content? 2 What are the methodological strengths, limitations and unique contributions of each measure? We conducted a retrospective analysis of data from field testing of both measures. The analysis included a comparative assessment of the basic validity, reliability and items used in each measure. Overall, the CHO-KLAT and the Haemo-QoL are promising and valuable measures of QoL for children with haemophilia. Our analyses confirmed the basic psychometric properties of both tools, but identified some discrepancies between them. Additional data will allow for greater understanding of these discrepancies and lend clarity to how the tools should be used in clinical studies (separately or merged). The present recommendation is that the measures be run independently, but preferably concurrently in studies of children with haemophilia.
PubMed ID
17083516 View in PubMed
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The persistence of American Indian health disparities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166795
Source
Am J Public Health. 2006 Dec;96(12):2122-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2006
Author
David S Jones
Author Affiliation
Center for the Study of Diversity in Science, Technology, and Medicine, Massachusetts Institute of Technology 02139, USA. dsjones@mit.edu
Source
Am J Public Health. 2006 Dec;96(12):2122-34
Date
Dec-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Colonialism - history
Europe - ethnology
Health Policy - history
Health Services Accessibility
Health Services, Indigenous - history
History, 16th Century
History, 17th Century
History, 18th Century
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Indians, North American - genetics
Politics
Poverty - ethnology
Rural Health - history
Smallpox - ethnology - history
Social Justice
Socioeconomic Factors
Tuberculosis - ethnology - history
United States - epidemiology
United States Indian Health Service
Vulnerable Populations - ethnology
Abstract
Disparities in health status between American Indians and other groups in the United States have persisted throughout the 500 years since Europeans arrived in the Americas. Colonists, traders, missionaries, soldiers, physicians, and government officials have struggled to explain these disparities, invoking a wide range of possible causes. American Indians joined these debates, often suggesting different explanations. Europeans and Americans also struggled to respond to the disparities, sometimes working to relieve them, sometimes taking advantage of the ill health of American Indians. Economic and political interests have always affected both explanations of health disparities and responses to them, influencing which explanations were emphasized and which interventions were pursued. Tensions also appear in ongoing debates about the contributions of genetic and socioeconomic forces to the pervasive health disparities. Understanding how these economic and political forces have operated historically can explain both the persistence of the health disparities and the controversies that surround them.
Notes
Cites: Bull Hist Med. 1988 Fall;62(3):351-833067787
Cites: J Am Hist. 1979;66(1):24-4011614686
Cites: Med Womans J. 1950 Nov;57(11):9-1614796228
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Comment In: Am J Public Health. 2007 Sep;97(9):1541-2; author reply 1542-317666681
PubMed ID
17077399 View in PubMed
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Evidence-based policy? The use of mobile phones in hospital.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166844
Source
J Public Health (Oxf). 2006 Dec;28(4):299-303
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2006
Author
Stefanie Ettelt
Ellen Nolte
Martin McKee
Odd Arild Haugen
Ingvar Karlberg
Niek Klazinga
Walter Ricciardi
Juha Teperi
Author Affiliation
European Centre on Health of Societies in Transition, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK.
Source
J Public Health (Oxf). 2006 Dec;28(4):299-303
Date
Dec-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cellular Phone - standards
Data Collection
Electromagnetic fields - adverse effects
Europe
Evidence-Based Medicine
Hospital Administration
Humans
Norway
Organizational Policy
Risk
Safety
Abstract
Evidence-based policies have become increasingly accepted in clinical practice. However, policies on many of the non-clinical activities that take place in health care facilities may be less frequently evidence based.
We carried out a review of literature on safety of mobile phones in hospitals and survey of practice in selected European countries.
When first evidence on the dangers of electronic interference associated with mobile phones appeared in the 1990s, hospitals in many countries introduced complete bans on mobile phones. Yet a review of recent evidence suggests that there is no significant risk from using mobile phones in hospitals as long as they are more than a metre away from sensitive equipment, whereas the risk to the most modern equipment is even less. With the technological evolution of mobile phones, the residual risk of interference appears to be minimal and controllable. Although some countries are reluctant to relax regulation, others now limit bans to areas in which sensitive equipment is used and some discourage the use of mobile phones on the grounds of noise exposure.
With new technology on the doorstep, the potential benefits and risks associated with mobile phones should be examined explicitly in the light of the evidence.
PubMed ID
17071816 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Analysis of survival and annual mortality in malignant skin melanoma on the population level].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167155
Source
Vopr Onkol. 2006;52(4):385-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006

Predicted persistence and response times of linear and cyclic volatile methylsiloxanes in global and local environments.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292202
Source
Chemosphere. 2018 Mar; 195:325-335
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2018
Author
Jaeshin Kim
Donald Mackay
Michael John Whelan
Author Affiliation
Toxicology and Environmental Research and Consulting, The Dow Chemical Company, Midland, MI, USA. Electronic address: jaeshin.kim@dowcorning.com.
Source
Chemosphere. 2018 Mar; 195:325-335
Date
Mar-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Environment
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Europe
Models, Chemical
Molecular Conformation
Siloxanes - chemistry
Volatilization
Water Pollutants, Chemical - chemistry
Abstract
We investigated the response times of eight volatile methylsiloxanes (VMSs) in environmental systems at different scales from local to global, with a particular focus on overall loss rates after cessation of emissions. In part, this is driven by proposals to restrict the use of some of these compounds in certain products in Europe. The GloboPOP model estimated low absolute Arctic Contamination Potentials for all VMSs and rapid response times in all media except sediment. VMSs are predicted to be distributed predominantly in air where they react with OH radicals, leading to short response times. After cessation of emissions VMSs concentrations in the environment are expected to decrease rapidly from current levels. Response times in specific water and sediment systems were evaluated using a dynamic QWASI model. Response times were sensitive to both physico-chemical properties and environmental characteristics. Degradation was predicted to play the most important role in determining response times in water and sediment. In the case of the lowest molecular weight VMSs such as L2 and D3, response times were essentially independent of environmental characteristics due to fast hydrolysis in water and sediment. However, response times for the other VMSs are system-specific. They are relatively short in shallow water bodies but increase with depth due to the diminishing role of volatilization on concentration change as volume to surface area ratio increases. In sediment, degradation and resuspension rates also contribute most to the response times. The estimated response times for local environments are useful for planning future monitoring programs.
PubMed ID
29272801 View in PubMed
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Welfare state and health inequalities under economic recession: Introduction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292240
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2017 08; 45(18_suppl):3-8
Publication Type
Introductory Journal Article
Date
08-2017
Author
Espen Dahl
Annett Arntzen
Øyvind Giæver
Author Affiliation
1 Department of Social Work, Child Welfare & Social Policy, Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2017 08; 45(18_suppl):3-8
Date
08-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Introductory Journal Article
Keywords
Economic Recession
Europe
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Norway
Social Welfare
Socioeconomic Factors
PubMed ID
28850008 View in PubMed
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3419 records – page 1 of 342.