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3406 records – page 1 of 341.

Prevalence of gallstones in a Danish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234529
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1987 Nov;126(5):912-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1987
Author
T. Jørgensen
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Internal Medicine C, KAS Glostrup, Denmark.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1987 Nov;126(5):912-21
Date
Nov-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cholelithiasis - diagnosis - epidemiology
Denmark
Epidemiologic Methods
Europe
Female
Gallbladder - pathology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Sex Factors
Ultrasonography
Abstract
A random sample of 4,807 men and women, aged 30, 40, 50, and 60 years, who lived in the western part of Copenhagen County, was drawn from the National Central Person Registry. A total of 226 subjects who were not of Danish origin were omitted. The response rate was 78.8% (3,608/4,581). Each person had his or her gallbladder examined by ultrasonography. The examinations took place between November 1982 and February 1984. The overall prevalence of gallstone disease (cases with stones and cholecystectomized cases) in males aged 30, 40, 50, and 60 years was 1.8%, 1.5%, 6.7%, and 12.9%, respectively. The corresponding prevalence in females was 4.8%, 6.1%, 14.4%, and 22.4%, respectively. Differences according to sex were significant in all age groups. Differences between the 40- and 50-year and 50- and 60-year age groups were significant in both sexes. Among subjects with gallstone disease, the disease was unknown to the proband in the majority of males and in the 30-year-old females, but only in half of the women aged 40, 50, and 60 years. The prevalence of clinically diagnosed gallstones was not significantly different between respondents and nonrespondents.
PubMed ID
3310613 View in PubMed
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Source
Can J Public Health. 1987 Sep-Oct;78(5):291-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
R A Spasoff
Source
Can J Public Health. 1987 Sep-Oct;78(5):291-4
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Europe
Health promotion
Humans
Organizational Objectives
Public Health
United States
PubMed ID
3690444 View in PubMed
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B-type natriuretic peptide and C-reactive protein in the prediction of atrial fibrillation risk: the CHARGE-AF Consortium of community-based cohort studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263592
Source
Europace. 2014 Oct;16(10):1426-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Moritz F Sinner
Katherine A Stepas
Carlee B Moser
Bouwe P Krijthe
Thor Aspelund
Nona Sotoodehnia
João D Fontes
A Cecile J W Janssens
Richard A Kronmal
Jared W Magnani
Jacqueline C Witteman
Alanna M Chamberlain
Steven A Lubitz
Renate B Schnabel
Ramachandran S Vasan
Thomas J Wang
Sunil K Agarwal
David D McManus
Oscar H Franco
Xiaoyan Yin
Martin G Larson
Gregory L Burke
Lenore J Launer
Albert Hofman
Daniel Levy
John S Gottdiener
Stefan Kääb
David Couper
Tamara B Harris
Brad C Astor
Christie M Ballantyne
Ron C Hoogeveen
Andrew E Arai
Elsayed Z Soliman
Patrick T Ellinor
Bruno H C Stricker
Vilmundur Gudnason
Susan R Heckbert
Michael J Pencina
Emelia J Benjamin
Alvaro Alonso
Source
Europace. 2014 Oct;16(10):1426-33
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Atrial Fibrillation - blood - epidemiology
Biological Markers - blood
C-Reactive Protein - metabolism
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Natriuretic Peptide, Brain - blood
Peptide Fragments - blood
Predictive value of tests
Risk assessment
Risk factors
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and C-reactive protein (CRP) predict atrial fibrillation (AF) risk. However, their risk stratification abilities in the broad community remain uncertain. We sought to improve risk stratification for AF using biomarker information.
We ascertained AF incidence in 18 556 Whites and African Americans from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (ARIC, n=10 675), Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS, n = 5043), and Framingham Heart Study (FHS, n = 2838), followed for 5 years (prediction horizon). We added BNP (ARIC/CHS: N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide; FHS: BNP), CRP, or both to a previously reported AF risk score, and assessed model calibration and predictive ability [C-statistic, integrated discrimination improvement (IDI), and net reclassification improvement (NRI)]. We replicated models in two independent European cohorts: Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility Reykjavik Study (AGES), n = 4467; Rotterdam Study (RS), n = 3203. B-type natriuretic peptide and CRP were significantly associated with AF incidence (n = 1186): hazard ratio per 1-SD ln-transformed biomarker 1.66 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.56-1.76], P
Notes
Cites: J Am Heart Assoc. 2013 Apr;2(2):e00010223537808
Cites: Europace. 2013 Nov;15(11):1540-5623981824
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2012 Sep 15;176(6):473-8122875755
Cites: Europace. 2012 Jun;14(6):810-722237586
Cites: Europace. 2012 Jan;14(1):8-2721791573
Cites: Stat Med. 2010 Apr 30;29(9):1037-5720087875
Cites: J Intern Med. 2011 Feb;269(2):160-7120964739
Cites: Stat Med. 2011 Jan 15;30(1):11-2121204120
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 2011 Jan;107(1):85-9121146692
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2010 Nov 22;170(21):1909-1721098350
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2010 Nov 16;56(21):1712-921070922
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2010 Jul;31(14):1730-620501475
Cites: Chest. 2010 Apr;137(4):869-7619858230
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 2010 Feb 15;105(4):495-50120152244
Cites: J Intern Med. 2012 Nov;272(5):504-1322550938
Cites: JAMA. 2013 Nov 20;310(19):2050-6024240932
Cites: Stroke. 2014 Feb;45(2):520-624385275
Cites: J Clin Lab Anal. 2006;20(6):227-3217115420
Cites: Int J Cardiol. 2005 Jan;98(1):73-715676170
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2005 Jan 4;45(1):82-615629379
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2004 Feb 12;350(7):655-6314960742
Cites: Circulation. 2003 Dec 16;108(24):3006-1014623805
Cites: Clin Chim Acta. 2003 Dec;338(1-2):107-1514637274
Cites: Prog Biophys Mol Biol. 2003 May-Jul;82(1-3):137-4912732274
Cites: Can J Physiol Pharmacol. 2001 Aug;79(8):646-5311558673
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2006 Jan 3;47(1):52-6016386664
Cites: Stat Med. 2008 Jan 30;27(2):157-72; discussion 207-1217569110
Cites: Int J Cardiol. 2008 Feb 29;124(2):244-617360054
Cites: Lancet. 2009 Feb 28;373(9665):739-4519249635
Cites: Pacing Clin Electrophysiol. 2009 May;32(5):648-5219422587
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 2009 Jul 1;104(1):92-619576326
Cites: Clin Cardiol. 2009 Sep;32(9):E45-5019645035
Cites: Circulation. 2009 Nov 3;120(18):1768-7419841297
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Cites: Circulation. 2010 Jan 19;121(2):200-720048208
PubMed ID
25037055 View in PubMed
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African swine fever: an epidemiological update.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263641
Source
Transbound Emerg Dis. 2012 Mar;59 Suppl 1:27-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
J M Sánchez-Vizcaíno
L. Mur
B. Martínez-López
Source
Transbound Emerg Dis. 2012 Mar;59 Suppl 1:27-35
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Africa, Southern - epidemiology
African Swine Fever - epidemiology - prevention & control
African Swine Fever Virus - immunology
Animals
Communicable Diseases, Emerging - prevention & control - veterinary
Europe - epidemiology
Global health
Russia - epidemiology
Swine
Abstract
African swine fever (ASF) is one of the most important swine diseases, mainly because of its significant sanitary and socioeconomic consequences. This review gives an update on the epidemiology of the disease and reviews key issues and strategies to improve control of the disease and promote its eradication. Several characteristics of ASF virus (ASFV) make its control and eradication difficult, including the absence of available vaccines, marked virus resistance in infected material and contaminated animal products, and a complex epidemiology and transmission involving tick reservoir virus interactions. The incidence of ASF has not only increased on the African continent over the last 15 years, so that it now affects West African countries, Mauritius and Madagascar, but it has also reached new areas, such as the Caucasus region in 2007. In fact, the rapid spread of the disease on the European continent and the uncontrolled situation in the Russian Federation places all countries at great risk as a result of intense global trade. The proximity of some affected areas to the European Union (EU) borders (
PubMed ID
22225967 View in PubMed
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Trends in consumption of alcoholic beverages and policy interventions in Europe: an uncertainty "associated" perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264092
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 2014 Oct;49(12):1531-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Allaman Allamani
Nadia Olimpi
Pasquale Pepe
Francesco Cipriani
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 2014 Oct;49(12):1531-45
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - prevention & control
Europe - epidemiology
Finland - epidemiology
Health Policy
Humans
Italy - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Poland - epidemiology
Program Evaluation
Spain - epidemiology
Switzerland - epidemiology
Uncertainty
Abstract
Having qualitatively investigated, both the temporal curves of alcoholic beverage consumption trends and the introduction of preventive alcohol policy measures in six European countries during the 1960s-2000s, drinking control policy measures often appeared to operate as co-factors of change, while during some periods of time they were not even present even if effective consumption changes were occurring. Study limitations are noted.
PubMed ID
24915172 View in PubMed
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Deposition history of polychlorinated biphenyls to the Lomonosovfonna Glacier, Svalbard: a 209 congener analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264147
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2013;47(21):12064-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Olga Garmash
Mark H Hermanson
Elisabeth Isaksson
Margit Schwikowski
Dmitry Divine
Camilla Teixeira
Derek C G Muir
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2013;47(21):12064-72
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air
Arctic Regions
Europe
Ice Cover
Polychlorinated biphenyls - analysis
Russia
Snow - chemistry
Svalbard
Abstract
A 37 m deep ice core representing 1957-2009 and snow from 2009 to 2010 were collected on the Lomonosovfonna glacier, Svalbard (78.82° N; 17.43° E) and analyzed for 209 polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners using high-resolution mass spectrometry. Congener profiles in all samples showed the prevalence of tetra- and pentachlorobiphenyls, dominated in all samples by PCB-44, PCB-52, PCB-70 + PCB-74, PCB-87 + PCB-97, PCB-95, PCB-99, PCB-101, and PCB-110. The ?PCB flux varied over time, but the peak flux, ~19 pg cm(-2) year(-1) from 1957 to 1966, recurred in 1974-1983, 1998-2009, and 2009-2010. The minimum was 5.75 pg cm(-2) year(-1) in 1989-1998, following a 15 year decline. Peak ?PCB fluxes here are lower than measured in the Canadian Arctic. The analysis of all 209 congeners revealed that PCB-11 (3,3'-dichlorobiphenyl) was present in all samples, representing 0.9-4.5% of ?PCB. PCB-11 was not produced in a commercial PCB product, and its source to the Arctic has not been well-characterized; however, our results confirm that the sources to Lomonosovfonna have been active since 1957. The higher fluxes of ?PCB correspond to periods when average 5 day air mass back trajectories have a frequency of 8-10% and reach 60° N or beyond over northern Europe and western Russia or the North Sea into the U.K.
PubMed ID
24073820 View in PubMed
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Massive migration from the steppe was a source for Indo-European languages in Europe.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264227
Source
Nature. 2015 Jun 11;522(7555):207-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-11-2015
Author
Wolfgang Haak
Iosif Lazaridis
Nick Patterson
Nadin Rohland
Swapan Mallick
Bastien Llamas
Guido Brandt
Susanne Nordenfelt
Eadaoin Harney
Kristin Stewardson
Qiaomei Fu
Alissa Mittnik
Eszter Bánffy
Christos Economou
Michael Francken
Susanne Friederich
Rafael Garrido Pena
Fredrik Hallgren
Valery Khartanovich
Aleksandr Khokhlov
Michael Kunst
Pavel Kuznetsov
Harald Meller
Oleg Mochalov
Vayacheslav Moiseyev
Nicole Nicklisch
Sandra L Pichler
Roberto Risch
Manuel A Rojo Guerra
Christina Roth
Anna Szécsényi-Nagy
Joachim Wahl
Matthias Meyer
Johannes Krause
Dorcas Brown
David Anthony
Alan Cooper
Kurt Werner Alt
David Reich
Source
Nature. 2015 Jun 11;522(7555):207-11
Date
Jun-11-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cultural Evolution - history
Europe - ethnology
Genome, Human - genetics
Grassland
History, Ancient
Human Migration - history
Humans
Language - history
Male
Polymorphism, Genetic - genetics
Population Dynamics
Russia
Abstract
We generated genome-wide data from 69 Europeans who lived between 8,000-3,000 years ago by enriching ancient DNA libraries for a target set of almost 400,000 polymorphisms. Enrichment of these positions decreases the sequencing required for genome-wide ancient DNA analysis by a median of around 250-fold, allowing us to study an order of magnitude more individuals than previous studies and to obtain new insights about the past. We show that the populations of Western and Far Eastern Europe followed opposite trajectories between 8,000-5,000 years ago. At the beginning of the Neolithic period in Europe, ~8,000-7,000 years ago, closely related groups of early farmers appeared in Germany, Hungary and Spain, different from indigenous hunter-gatherers, whereas Russia was inhabited by a distinctive population of hunter-gatherers with high affinity to a ~24,000-year-old Siberian. By ~6,000-5,000 years ago, farmers throughout much of Europe had more hunter-gatherer ancestry than their predecessors, but in Russia, the Yamnaya steppe herders of this time were descended not only from the preceding eastern European hunter-gatherers, but also from a population of Near Eastern ancestry. Western and Eastern Europe came into contact ~4,500 years ago, as the Late Neolithic Corded Ware people from Germany traced ~75% of their ancestry to the Yamnaya, documenting a massive migration into the heartland of Europe from its eastern periphery. This steppe ancestry persisted in all sampled central Europeans until at least ~3,000 years ago, and is ubiquitous in present-day Europeans. These results provide support for a steppe origin of at least some of the Indo-European languages of Europe.
Notes
Comment In: Nature. 2015 Jun 11;522(7555):164-526062506
PubMed ID
25731166 View in PubMed
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Latent heat exchange in the boreal and arctic biomes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264304
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2014 Nov;20(11):3439-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
Ville Kasurinen
Knut Alfredsen
Pasi Kolari
Ivan Mammarella
Pavel Alekseychik
Janne Rinne
Timo Vesala
Pierre Bernier
Julia Boike
Moritz Langer
Luca Belelli Marchesini
Ko van Huissteden
Han Dolman
Torsten Sachs
Takeshi Ohta
Andrej Varlagin
Adrian Rocha
Altaf Arain
Walter Oechel
Magnus Lund
Achim Grelle
Anders Lindroth
Andy Black
Mika Aurela
Tuomas Laurila
Annalea Lohila
Frank Berninger
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2014 Nov;20(11):3439-56
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Asia
Ecosystem
Europe
Forests
Grassland
Hot Temperature
Models, Theoretical
North America
Tundra
Wetlands
Abstract
In this study latent heat flux (?E) measurements made at 65 boreal and arctic eddy-covariance (EC) sites were analyses by using the Penman-Monteith equation. Sites were stratified into nine different ecosystem types: harvested and burnt forest areas, pine forests, spruce or fir forests, Douglas-fir forests, broadleaf deciduous forests, larch forests, wetlands, tundra and natural grasslands. The Penman-Monteith equation was calibrated with variable surface resistances against half-hourly eddy-covariance data and clear differences between ecosystem types were observed. Based on the modeled behavior of surface and aerodynamic resistances, surface resistance tightly control ?E in most mature forests, while it had less importance in ecosystems having shorter vegetation like young or recently harvested forests, grasslands, wetlands and tundra. The parameters of the Penman-Monteith equation were clearly different for winter and summer conditions, indicating that phenological effects on surface resistance are important. We also compared the simulated ?E of different ecosystem types under meteorological conditions at one site. Values of ?E varied between 15% and 38% of the net radiation in the simulations with mean ecosystem parameters. In general, the simulations suggest that ?E is higher from forested ecosystems than from grasslands, wetlands or tundra-type ecosystems. Forests showed usually a tighter stomatal control of ?E as indicated by a pronounced sensitivity of surface resistance to atmospheric vapor pressure deficit. Nevertheless, the surface resistance of forests was lower than for open vegetation types including wetlands. Tundra and wetlands had higher surface resistances, which were less sensitive to vapor pressure deficits. The results indicate that the variation in surface resistance within and between different vegetation types might play a significant role in energy exchange between terrestrial ecosystems and atmosphere. These results suggest the need to take into account vegetation type and phenology in energy exchange modeling.
PubMed ID
24889888 View in PubMed
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[Approaches of European and Russian legislation in the field of management of medical waste].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264433
Source
Gig Sanit. 2014 Nov-Dec;93(6):9-13
Publication Type
Article
Author
N M Samutin
N V Rusakov
N N Butorina
N S Kobzev
A K Ustinov
Source
Gig Sanit. 2014 Nov-Dec;93(6):9-13
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Europe
Humans
Hygiene - legislation & jurisprudence
Medical Waste - legislation & jurisprudence
Refuse Disposal - legislation & jurisprudence
Russia
Waste Management - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
A comparative analysis of Russian and European legislation concerning to the waste management has been performed. There were revealed principal differences in Russian and European legislation in methodology of the waste classification. In Europe, there is no methodology for breaking up waste into hazard classes, and for the denomination of the danger there are used hazard lists which fail to give information about the extent of their danger. Medical waste in the European legislation are not selected into the separate category as being included in terms of articles and lists in the annexes to the directives or other legal acts. There are considered requirements of the Russian and European legislation in the area of the landfill waste burial. In the frameworks of the proposals for the implementation of international experience in the waste management there was drafted the project of Sanitary rules on hygiene requirements to the arrangement and the contents of landfills for residential solid waste, which includes requirements concerning not only residential solid waste, but also medical waste.
PubMed ID
25950037 View in PubMed
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3406 records – page 1 of 341.