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2640 records – page 1 of 264.

A 5-year prospective population-based study of juvenile chronic arthritis: onset, disease process, and outcome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124008
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 2012 Oct;41(5):379-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
L. Bertilsson
B. Andersson-Gäre
A. Fasth
H. Forsblad-d'Elia
Author Affiliation
Department of Rheumatology and Inflammation Research, University of Gothenburg, Sweden. lennart.bertilsson2@comhem.se
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 2012 Oct;41(5):379-82
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age of Onset
Arthritis, Juvenile - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Child
Disease Progression
Female
Humans
Incidence
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Prevalence
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Sweden
Uveitis - diagnosis - etiology - physiopathology
Abstract
To investigate, in a population-based cohort of patients with juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA), onset characteristics, progression, outcome, and prognostic factors longitudinally for 5 years.
This cohort consisted of 132 incidence cases identified between 1984 and 1986 in southwestern Sweden followed for 5 years with annual reports of subgroup, joint assessment, disease activity, eye examinations, laboratory measurements, and medication. At the 5-year follow-up, the Childhood Health Assessment Questionnaire (Child-HAQ) was evaluated. European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) criteria for diagnosis and disease activity were used.
During the 5 years only four patients were lost to follow-up, 34% changed subgroup and 8% developed uveitis. At the 5-year follow-up the disease was active in 12% of the patients, stable in 28%, inactive in 25%, and in remission in 34%. Among those examined, 24% had radiological changes, of whom half had advanced changes. The Child-HAQ median score at the 5-year follow-up was 0.13 (range 0.0-1.9). The number of involved joints at inclusion correlated positively with active disease at the 5-year follow-up. Age at disease onset, the number of involved joints, and the number of joints with arthritis correlated positively with continuous disease and Child-HAQ score. CONCLUSION. Our study shows a diverse disease course during the first 5 years of JCA where one-third changed subgroup and two-thirds did not reach remission. Age of disease onset, the number of involved joints, and the number of joints with arthritis at inclusion were associated with poor outcome at the 5-year follow-up.
PubMed ID
22639832 View in PubMed
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A 10-year follow-up of snoring in men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10800
Source
Chest. 1998 Oct;114(4):1048-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1998
Author
E. Lindberg
A. Taube
C. Janson
T. Gislason
K. Svärdsudd
G. Boman
Author Affiliation
Department of Lung Medicine and Asthma Research Centre, Uppsala University, Akademiska Sjukhuset, Sweden.
Source
Chest. 1998 Oct;114(4):1048-55
Date
Oct-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Body mass index
Comparative Study
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Random Allocation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Snoring - epidemiology - etiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Weight Gain
Abstract
STUDY OBJECTIVES: Little is known about the natural development of snoring, and this survey was conducted to study the development of snoring in men over a 10-year period. DESIGN: Population-based prospective survey. SETTING: The Municipality of Uppsala, Sweden. PARTICIPANTS AND MEASUREMENTS: In 1984, 3,201 randomly selected men aged 30 to 69 years answered a questionnaire on snoring and sleep disturbances. Of the 2,975 survivors in 1994, 2,668 (89.7%) answered a new questionnaire with identical questions to those used at baseline. Questions about smoking habits, alcohol, and physical activity were also added. RESULTS: Habitual snoring was reported by 393 men (15.0%) in 1984 and by 529 (20.4%) 10 years later. In both 1984 and 1994, the prevalence of snoring increased until age 50 to 60 years and then decreased. Risk factors for being a habitual snorer at the follow-up were investigated using multiple logistic regression with adjustments for previous snoring status, age, body mass index (BMI), weight gain, smoking habits, and physical activity. In men aged 30 to 49 years at baseline, the predictors of habitual snoring at the follow-up, in addition to previous snoring status, were as follows: persistent smoking (adjusted odds ratio, 95% confidence interval) (1.4, 1.1 to 1.9), BMI 1984 (1.1, 1.02 to 1.1/kg/m2) and weight gain (1.1, 1.03 to 1.2/kg/m2). Among men aged 50 to 69 years, after adjustments for previous snoring status and age, weight gain was the only significant risk factor for developing habitual snoring (1.2, 1.05 to 1.4/kg/m2). CONCLUSIONS: In men, the prevalence of snoring increases up to the age of 50 to 60 years and is then followed by a decrease. Weight gain is a risk factor for snoring in all age groups, while smoking is mainly associated with snoring in men
PubMed ID
9792576 View in PubMed
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A 40-year history of overweight children in Stockholm: life-time overweight, morbidity, and mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23563
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 1994 Sep;18(9):585-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1994
Author
L. DiPietro
H O Mossberg
A J Stunkard
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia.
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 1994 Sep;18(9):585-90
Date
Sep-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology - etiology
Digestive System Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Middle Aged
Morbidity
Musculoskeletal Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Obesity - complications - epidemiology - mortality
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
We describe the 40-year weight history and adult morbidity and mortality in a cohort of 504 overweight children, aged 2 months to 16 years, who were admitted for investigation of their overweight to four children's hospitals in Stockholm between 1921 and 1947. Follow-up information was gathered by questionnaire at 10-year intervals, most recently in 1980-1983 (n = 458), on weight history (based on the body mass index (BMI = kg/m2)), as well as prevalence of cardiovascular disease (n = 143), diabetes (n = 39), and cancer (all types (n = 20)), reported during the 40 years of follow-up, and mortality from all causes (n = 55), determined from death certificate. The sample of overweight children remained overweight as adults; after age 55 years, the BMI began to decline for both genders. Female subjects were heavier than their male counterparts from postpuberty onward. Subjects who died by the 40-year follow-up and those reporting cardiovascular disease were significantly (P
PubMed ID
7812410 View in PubMed
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[1998 Quebec Social and Health Survey: determinants of chronic respiratory diseases].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193733
Source
Can J Public Health. 2001 May-Jun;92(3):228-32
Publication Type
Article
Author
B. Lévesque
P. Lajoie
M. Rhainds
T. Kosatsky
A M Grenier
P. Ernst
N. Audet
Author Affiliation
Direction régionale de santé publique de Québec, 2400, d'Estimauville, Beauport, Québec, G1E 7G9. benoît.lévesque@crchul.ulaval.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2001 May-Jun;92(3):228-32
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Asthma - complications
Bronchitis - complications
Child
Child, Preschool
Chronic Disease
Emphysema - complications
Health Surveys
Humans
Hypersensitivity - complications
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Quebec - epidemiology
Respiratory Sounds - etiology
Respiratory Tract Infections - complications - epidemiology - prevention & control
Smoking - adverse effects
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects
Abstract
In the course of the "1998 Health and Social Survey", questions were included to verify the prevalence of chronic respiratory diseases and also of wheezing. The objectives of this study were 1) to verify the prevalence of wheezing and its validity as an indicator of chronic respiratory diseases in Québec; and 2) to examine the relationship between chronic respiratory diseases and some of their potential determinants. A total of 30,386 individuals participated in the study. For all ages, the prevalence of wheezing was 5.4%. It was associated with asthma, allergies, chronic bronchitis and emphysema. A low familial income and tobacco smoking were associated with wheezing, asthma, chronic bronchitis and emphysema. Passive smoking was associated with wheezing whereas the presence of carpets was associated with wheezing and asthma. Between 32 and 48% of families with an asthmatic or an allergic member modified their dwelling to alleviate respiratory problems. The prevalence of wheezing documented here was lower than in anglosaxon countries. This result could be explained by a cultural factor (the French translation or the perception of wheezing). This study emphasizes the role of reducing tobacco smoking in the prevention of chronic respiratory diseases.
PubMed ID
11496637 View in PubMed
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[Abdominal obesity and associated comorbidities among primary care patients]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96760
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2010 May 24;172(21):1586-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-24-2010
Author
Ketil Haugan
Dan Rost
Nils Knudsen
Leif Breum
Author Affiliation
Medicinsk Afdeling, Roskilde Sygehus, 4000 Roskilde, Denmark. ketilhaugan@hotmail.com
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2010 May 24;172(21):1586-91
Date
May-24-2010
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - etiology
Dyslipidemias - etiology
Family Practice
Female
Humans
Hypertension - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity, Abdominal - complications - epidemiology
Prevalence
Primary Health Care
Waist Circumference
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Abdominal obesity is associated with type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, dyslipidemia and hypertension. The prevalence of abdominal obesity and its relationship with these comorbidities have not previously been examined in Danish primary care patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The IDEA study was an international cross sectional study including 168,159 patients worldwide. In Denmark, 47 randomly selected general practitioners included 847 consecutive patients. Age, gender, waist circumference, body mass index (BMI) and the presence of known comorbidities were recorded for all patients. RESULTS: The prevalence of abdominal obesity (waist circumference = 80 cm for women and = 94 cm for men) was 66% among women and 60% among men. There was a significant relationship between the degree of abdominal obesity and the prevalence of diabetes, dyslipidemia and hypertension for both sexes. There was a trend towards an increased prevalence of cardiovascular disease with increased waist circumference. CONCLUSION: Abdominal obesity is very frequently found in Danish primary care patients, and it is associated with an increased prevalence of diabetes, dyslipidemia and hypertension. Patients with increased waist circumference should be screened to diagnose comorbidities related to the abdominal obesity.
PubMed ID
20525471 View in PubMed
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Abdominal pain in long-term spinal cord injury.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86843
Source
Spinal Cord. 2008 Mar;46(3):198-203
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Finnerup N B
Faaborg P.
Krogh K.
Jensen T S
Author Affiliation
Danish Pain Research Center, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. finnerup@ki.au.dk
Source
Spinal Cord. 2008 Mar;46(3):198-203
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Pain - etiology - physiopathology
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chronic Disease
Colon - physiopathology
Constipation - complications - physiopathology
Denmark
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Rectum - physiopathology
Spinal Cord Injuries - complications - physiopathology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To describe the prevalence and character of chronic abdominal pain in a group of patients with long-term spinal cord injury (SCI) and to assess predictors of abdominal pain. STUDY DESIGN: Postal survey. SETTING: Members of the Danish Paraplegic Association. METHODS: We mailed a questionnaire to 284 members of the Danish Paraplegic Association who met the inclusion criteria (member for at least 10 years). The questionnaire contained questions about cause and level of spinal injury, colorectal function and pain/discomfort. RESULTS: Seventy percent returned the questionnaire (133 men and 70 women). Mean age was 47 years. Thirty-four percent reported having chronic abdominal pain or discomfort. Onset of pain was later than 5 years after their SCI in 53%. Low defecation frequency was more common in patients with abdominal pain/discomfort and constipation more often affected their quality of life compared to patients without abdominal pain/discomfort. The most common descriptors were annoying, cramping/tightening, tender, sickening and shooting/jolting. There was no relation to age, time since injury or level of injury, but more women than men reported abdominal pain/discomfort. There was no relation of abdominal pain to other types of pain. CONCLUSION: Chronic pain located in the abdomen is frequent in patients with long-term SCI. The delayed onset following SCI and the relation to constipation suggest that constipation plays an important role for this type of pain in the spinal cord injured.
PubMed ID
17621311 View in PubMed
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Abdominal wall defects in Denmark, 1970-89.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31708
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2002 Jan;16(1):73-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2002
Author
M. Bugge
N V Holm
Author Affiliation
Wilhelm Johannsen Centre for Functional Genome Research, Department of Medical Genetics, Institute of Biochemistry and Genetics, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. MB@IMBG.ku.dk
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2002 Jan;16(1):73-81
Date
Jan-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Muscles - abnormalities
Birth Certificates
Cohort Studies
Death Certificates
Denmark - epidemiology
Fetal Death - epidemiology - etiology
Gastroschisis - classification - epidemiology
Hernia, Umbilical - classification - epidemiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Prevalence
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
In the last two to three decades, increasing rates of gastroschisis but not of omphalocele have been reported from different parts of the world. The present study represents a register containing 469 children born with abdominal wall defects based on data retrieved from 20 birth cohorts (1970-89) in three nationwide registries. A tentative estimate of the completeness as regards identification of liveborn and stillborn infants is a minimum of 95% and 90% respectively. All cases were reclassified to 166 cases of gastroschisis, 258 of omphalocele and 16 of gross abdominal wall defect. The average point prevalence at birth of gastroschisis was 1.33 per 10 000 live and stillbirths. During the first decade, an increase in prevalence occurred culminating in 1976, followed by a decrease reaching its initial value in 1983 and then a new increase. Overall, no significant linear trend could be demonstrated for the entire period. The average point prevalence at birth for omphalocele was 2.07 and for gross abdominal wall defect 0.12 per 10 000 live and stillbirths with no significant change in the period. The geographical distribution of gastroschisis and omphalocele showed no difference per county.
PubMed ID
11856457 View in PubMed
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Abnormal diurnal rhythm of urine output following renal transplantation: the impact of blood pressure and diuretics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139130
Source
Transplant Proc. 2010 Nov;42(9):3529-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
K. Alstrup
C. Graugaard-Jensen
S. Rittig
K A Jørgensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Nephrology, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, Denmark. karenalstrup@dadlnet.dk
Source
Transplant Proc. 2010 Nov;42(9):3529-36
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Case-Control Studies
Chi-Square Distribution
Circadian Rhythm
Denmark
Diuretics - therapeutic use
Drinking
Female
Humans
Kidney Transplantation - adverse effects
Male
Middle Aged
Osmolar Concentration
Polyuria - drug therapy - etiology - physiopathology
Prevalence
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Urination - drug effects
Urodynamics - drug effects
Young Adult
Abstract
Nocturnal polyuria is the excretion at night of an excessive volume of urine. A major problem following renal transplantation is an abnormal diurnal rhythmicity in urine output. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the prevalence of nocturnal polyuria among renal transplant recipients in the early period after transplantation as well as at least 1 year after transplantation. We aimed to explore possible pathophysiological mechanisms behind nocturnal polyuria in this group of patients, focusing on the impact of blood pressure and medication.
Seventeen recently transplanted patients 17 late transplant recipients, and 17 healthy controls were included in the study. Voiding habits were assessed by completion of a frequency-volume chart recording all fluid intakes and voiding. A concomitant 24-hour blood pressure profile was obtained in all.
Renal transplant recipients had a high prevalence of nocturnal polyuria (74%) and a disturbed blood pressure profile with a lack of appropriate nocturnal dipping (P
Notes
Comment In: J Urol. 2012 Mar;187(3):96422325519
PubMed ID
21094810 View in PubMed
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[About life, work and health problems of fishermen employed by PPP and H "Dalmor" SA., fishing at the Sea of Okhotsk].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216598
Source
Med Pr. 1995;46(3):309-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995

Absence of human bocavirus from deceased fetuses and their mothers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146525
Source
J Clin Virol. 2010 Feb;47(2):186-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Anita Riipinen
Elina Väisänen
Anne Lahtinen
Riitta Karikoski
Mika Nuutila
Heljä-Marja Surcel
Helena Taskinen
Klaus Hedman
Maria Söderlund-Venermo
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Topeliuksenkatu 41 a A, FIN-00250 Helsinki, Finland. anita.riipinen@ttl.fi
Source
J Clin Virol. 2010 Feb;47(2):186-8
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Spontaneous - etiology
Adolescent
Adult
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Female
Fetal Death - etiology
Fetus - virology
Finland - epidemiology
Heart - virology
Human bocavirus - isolation & purification
Humans
Immunoglobulin G - blood
Immunoglobulin M - blood
Liver - virology
Middle Aged
Parvoviridae Infections - epidemiology - virology
Placenta - virology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - epidemiology - virology
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Young Adult
Abstract
The human bocavirus (HBoV), a newly discovered parvovirus, is closely related to the bovine parvovirus and the canine minute virus, which are known to cause adverse pregnancy outcomes. Another human parvovirus, B19, can lead to fetal hydrops, miscarriage and intrauterine fetal death (IUFD).
To determine the prevalence of HBoV DNA in aborted fetuses and IUFDs. The HBoV serology of the mothers was also studied.
We retrospectively studied all available fetuses (N=535) autopsied during 7/1992-12/1995, and 1/2003-12/2005 in Helsinki, Finland. All available formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded fetal tissues - placenta, heart and liver - of 120 miscarriages, 169 IUFDs, and 246 induced abortions were studied by quantitative PCR. We also measured the HBoV IgM and IgG antibodies in the corresponding maternal sera (N=462) mostly of the first trimester. The IgM-positive sera underwent HBoV PCR.
None of the fetal tissues harbored HBoV DNA. A total of 97% (448/462) of the mothers were positive for IgG antibodies to HBoV, while only 0.9% (4/462) exhibited HBoV-specific IgM antibodies without viremia or respiratory symptoms. One IgM-positive mother had an unexplained fetal loss.
We did not find HBoV DNA in any of the deceased fetuses. Almost all pregnant women were HBoV-IgG positive.
PubMed ID
20031484 View in PubMed
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2640 records – page 1 of 264.