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31927 records – page 1 of 3193.

1 Canadian Field Hospital in Haiti: surgical experience in earthquake relief.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122035
Source
Can J Surg. 2012 Aug;55(4):271-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Max Talbot
Bethann Meunier
Vincent Trottier
Michael Christian
Tracey Hillier
Chris Berger
Vivian McAlister
Scott Taylor
Author Affiliation
1 Canadian Field Hospital, Canadian Forces, Montreal, QC. max_talbot@hotmail.com
Source
Can J Surg. 2012 Aug;55(4):271-4
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Disaster Planning - organization & administration
Earthquakes
Female
Haiti
Hospitals, Packaged - organization & administration
Humans
International Cooperation
Male
Multiple Trauma - etiology - surgery
Operating Rooms
Relief Work - organization & administration
Surgical Procedures, Operative - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The Canadian Forces' (CF) deployable hospital, 1 Canadian Field Hospital, was deployed to Haiti after an earthquake that caused massive devastation. Two surgical teams performed 167 operations over a 39-day period starting 17 days after the index event. Most operations were unrelated to the earthquake. Replacing or supplementing the destroyed local surgical capacity for a brief period after a disaster can be a valuable contribution to relief efforts. For future humanitarian operations/disaster response missions, the CF will study the feasibility of accelerating the deployment of surgical capabilities.
Notes
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Cites: Prehosp Disaster Med. 2003 Oct-Dec;18(4):278-9015310039
Cites: Disaster Manag Response. 2005 Jan-Mar;3(1):11-615627125
Cites: Mil Med. 2007 May;172(5):471-717521092
Cites: Prehosp Disaster Med. 2008 Mar-Apr;23(2):144-51; discussion 152-318557294
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2010 Jun 1;152(11):733-720197507
Cites: Prehosp Disaster Med. 2009 Jan-Feb;24(1):9-1019557952
Cites: Science. 2010 Feb 5;327(5966):638-920133550
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Cites: Prehosp Disaster Med. 2009 Jan-Feb;24(1):3-819557951
PubMed ID
22854149 View in PubMed
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The -1C to T polymorphism in the annexin A5 gene is not associated with the risk of acute myocardial infarction or sudden cardiac death in middle-aged Finnish males.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53135
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2005;65(2):133-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
K S Kaikkonen
S. Kakko
M L Kortelainen
J M Tapanainen
M J Savolainen
Y. Antero Kesäniemi
H V Huikuri
E R Savolainen
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2005;65(2):133-40
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
5' Untranslated Regions - genetics
Adult
Aged
Annexin A5 - genetics
Death, Sudden, Cardiac - epidemiology - etiology
Finland - epidemiology
Genetic markers
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genetic Screening
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - genetics
Polymorphism, Genetic
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: A common polymorphism (-1C to T) in the translation initiation sequence of annexin A5 (ANV) gene has recently been associated with a decreased risk of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The aim of the present study was to analyze the association between the ANV genepolymorphism and the risk of AMI and ischemic sudden cardiac death (SCD) in middle-aged Finnish males. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A case-control study involving three distinct groups of subjects was carried out: (1) victims of SCD (n=98), (2) survivors of AMI (n=212), and (3) randomly selected control subjects without any history of coronary heart disease (n=243). The ANV polymorphism was genotyped in each study group. RESULTS: Among the control group of healthy Finnish males the prevalence rates of the CC, CT, and TT genotypes were 83.1%, 15.2%, and 1.6%, respectively. Among the survivors of AMI, the prevalence rates of CC, CT, and TT were 79.7%, 20.3%, and 0%, respectively, and among the victims of SCD 83.7%, 16.3%, and 0%, respectively. No significant differences in the genotype or allele distributions were observed between the study groups. CONCLUSION: The -1C to T polymorphism in the ANV gene is not associated with the risk of AMI or SCD in middle-aged Finnish males.
PubMed ID
16025836 View in PubMed
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A 1-year follow up of psychological wellbeing after subtotal and total hysterectomy--a randomised study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98373
Source
BJOG. 2010 Mar;117(4):479-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010
Author
Persson, P
Brynhildsen, J
Kjølhede, P
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. par.persson@akademiska.se
Source
BJOG. 2010 Mar;117(4):479-87
Date
Mar-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety Disorders - etiology
Depressive Disorder - etiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Humans
Hysterectomy - adverse effects - methods - psychology
Mental health
Middle Aged
Patient satisfaction
Postoperative Complications - psychology
Prospective Studies
Psychometrics
Quality of Life
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To compare subtotal abdominal hysterectomy (SH) and total abdominal hysterectomy (TH) regarding influence on postoperative psychological wellbeing and surgical outcome measurements. DESIGN: A prospective, open, randomised multicentre trial. SETTING: Seven hospitals and one private clinic in the south-east of Sweden. POPULATION: Two-hundred women scheduled for abdominal hysterectomy for benign conditions were enrolled in the study; 179 women completed the study (94 SH and 85 TH). METHODS: Four different psychometric tests were used to measure general wellbeing, depression and anxiety preoperatively, and at 6 and 12 months postoperatively. Statistical analysis of variance and covariance were used. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Effects of operating method on psychological wellbeing postoperatively. Analysis of demographic, clinical and surgical data, including peri- and postoperative complications and complaints at follow up. RESULTS: No significant differences were observed between the two groups in any of the psychometric tests. Both surgical methods were associated with a significantly higher degree of psychological wellbeing at 6 and 12 months postoperatively, compared with preoperatively. No significant differences were found in the clinical measures including complications. A substantial number of women experienced persistent cyclic vaginal bleedings after SH. Neither minor or major postoperative complications, nor serum concentration of sex hormones, were associated with general psychological wellbeing 12 months after the operation. CONCLUSIONS: General psychological wellbeing is equally improved after both SH and TH within 12 months of the operation, and does not seem to be associated with the occurrence of peroperative complications or serum concentration of sex hormones.
PubMed ID
20074265 View in PubMed
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2,8-dihydroxyadeninuria: are there no cases in Scandinavia?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175743
Source
Scand J Urol Nephrol. 2005;39(1):82-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Margret Arnadottir
Thröstur Laxdal
Bergljot Halldorsdottir
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, Landspitali University Hospital Hringbraut, Reykjavik, Iceland. margarn@landspitali.is
Source
Scand J Urol Nephrol. 2005;39(1):82-6
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenine - analogs & derivatives - metabolism - urine
Adenine Phosphoribosyltransferase - deficiency - genetics
Heterozygote
Homozygote
Humans
Mutation
Renal Insufficiency - etiology
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Urinary Calculi - etiology - urine
Abstract
Homozygosity or mixed heterozygosity for mutations in the adenine phosphoribosyltransferase gene cause enzyme deficiency directing adenine through an alternative metabolic pathway. This results in the production of 2,8-dihydroxyadenine, which is actively secreted into the urine. 2,8-dihydroxyadenine is insoluble at physiological urinary pH but as marked supersaturation is possible the manifestations differ: there may be minimal consequences, there may be infiltration of the tubulointerstitial tissue with acute or chronic damage or there may be stone formation in the urinary tract. Effective treatment can be offered and therefore the prognosis depends upon the renal function at diagnosis. Treatment consists of adequate fluid intake, a low-purine diet and administration of allopurinol. Urinary 2,8-dihydroxyadenine crystals are easily recognized under a microscope. The diagnosis of 2,8-dihydroxyadeninuria can be confirmed by estimation of adenine phosphoribosyltransferase activity in erythrocyte lysates. More than 300 cases of 2,8-dihydroxyadeninuria have been diagnosed worldwide, most of them in Japan, France and Iceland. One case has been reported in Finland but there have been no reports from the Scandinavian peninsula or from Denmark. The relevant mutations may be very rare in these countries but underdiagnosis is also possible.
PubMed ID
15764278 View in PubMed
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[2-stage treatment of acute pneumonia patients with rehabilitation at the sanatorial stage].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature239433
Source
Ter Arkh. 1985;57(3):133-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985
Author
Iu N Shteingardt
T N Zaripova
T S Ageeva
N A Mal'kov
N A Goreva
Source
Ter Arkh. 1985;57(3):133-5
Date
1985
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Health Resorts
Humans
Length of Stay
Methods
Middle Aged
Mud Therapy
Pneumonia - etiology - therapy
Siberia
Abstract
A total of 73 patients with acute pneumonia received two-stage treatment: etiotropic treatment based on early etiological diagnosis (at hospital) and subsequent early rehabilitation at sanatorium with the use of peloid therapy. It made it possible to attain the best short-term results in the treatment of pneumonias (as compared with control group patients), to shorten 2-4-fold the times of the patients' stay at hospital and to raise bed capacity, to reduce the total doses and duration of antibacterial therapy, to decrease the possibility of the allergic reactions and side effects, and to reduce 2-fold the cost of antibacterial therapy.
PubMed ID
4002155 View in PubMed
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2-year clinical outcomes after implantation of sirolimus-eluting, paclitaxel-eluting, and bare-metal coronary stents: results from the WDHR (Western Denmark Heart Registry).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89935
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2009 Feb 24;53(8):658-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-24-2009
Author
Kaltoft Anne
Jensen Lisette Okkels
Maeng Michael
Tilsted Hans Henrik
Thayssen Per
Bøttcher Morten
Lassen Jens Flensted
Krusell Lars Romer
Rasmussen Klaus
Hansen Knud Nørregaard
Pedersen Lars
Johnsen Søren Paaske
Sørensen Henrik Toft
Thuesen Leif
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, Brendstrupgaardsvej 100, 8200 Aarhus N, Denmark. annekaltoft@stofanet.dk
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2009 Feb 24;53(8):658-64
Date
Feb-24-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Angioplasty, Transluminal, Percutaneous Coronary
Coronary Disease - mortality - therapy
Drug-Eluting Stents - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Immunosuppressive Agents
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - etiology
Paclitaxel
Sirolimus
Stents - adverse effects
Thrombosis - etiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: This registry study assessed the safety and efficacy of the 2 types of drug-eluting stents (DES), sirolimus-eluting stents (SES) and paclitaxel-eluting stents (PES), compared with bare-metal stents (BMS). BACKGROUND: Drug-eluting stents may increase the risk of stent thrombosis (ST), myocardial infarction (MI), and death. METHODS: A total of 12,395 consecutive patients with coronary intervention and stent implantation recorded in the Western Denmark Heart Registry from January 2002 through June 2005 were followed up for 2 years. Data on death and MI were ascertained from national medical databases. We used Cox regression analysis to control for confounding. RESULTS: The 2-year incidence of definite ST was 0.64% in BMS patients, 0.79% in DES patients (adjusted relative risk [RR]: 1.09; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.72 to 1.65), 0.50% in SES patients (adjusted RR: 0.63, 95% CI: 0.35 to 1.15), and 1.30% in PES patients (adjusted RR: 1.82, 95% CI: 1.13 to 2.94). The incidence of MI was 3.8% in BMS-treated patients, 4.5% in DES-treated patients (adjusted RR: 1.24, 95% CI: 1.02 to 1.51), 4.1% in SES-treated patients (adjusted RR: 1.15, 95% CI: 0.91 to 1.47), and 5.3% in PES-treated patients (adjusted RR: 1.38, 95% CI: 1.06 to 1.81). Whereas overall 2-year adjusted mortality was similar in the BMS and the 2 DES stent groups, 12- to 24-month mortality was higher in patients treated with PES (RR 1.46, 95% CI: 1.02 to 2.09). Target lesion revascularization was reduced in both DES groups. CONCLUSIONS: During 2 years of follow-up, patients treated with PES had an increased risk of ST and MI compared with those treated with BMS and SES. Mortality after 12 months was also increased in PES patients.
Notes
Comment In: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2009 Feb 24;53(8):665-619232898
PubMed ID
19232897 View in PubMed
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A 2-year follow-up study of anxiety and depression in women referred for colposcopy after an abnormal cervical smear.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature85180
Source
BJOG. 2008 Jan;115(2):212-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2008
Author
Hellsten C.
Sjöström, K.
Lindqvist P G
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Malmö University Hospital, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden. charlotte.hellsten@med.lu.se
Source
BJOG. 2008 Jan;115(2):212-8
Date
Jan-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety Disorders - etiology
Colposcopy - psychology
Depressive Disorder - etiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Referral and Consultation
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - prevention & control - psychology
Vaginal Smears - psychology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to determine if there were any long-lasting elevated anxiety levels in women attending colposcopy after an abnormal cervical smear. DESIGN: Prospective study. SETTING: Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Malm�?�¶ University Hospital, Sweden. POPULATION: One hundred consecutive women were invited to participate when referred for colposcopy. METHODS: Women in the study group completed the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale-self-rate (MADRS-S) and had a psychosocial interview prior to colposcopy at their two follow-up visits. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: State anxiety levels and depression scores at first visit, 6 months and 2 years. RESULTS: At follow up, levels of state anxiety and the depression scores of the women studied had decreased and were comparable to those of Swedish normative data. Two variables from the MADRS-S, 'ability to focus on different activities' and 'emotional involvement with others and in activities' were the most prominent for women with moderate to severe depression. At the 2-year visit, 30% of the women still had a fear of cancer. CONCLUSIONS: Referral for colposcopy after an abnormal cervical smear does not seem to result in long-lasting anxiety and depression. However, a subgroup of women, with the initially highest depression scores, still had at 2-year state anxiety levels and depression scores significantly higher than normal. Almost one-third of the women still had a fear of cancer in spite of lower 2-year state anxiety levels.
PubMed ID
18081601 View in PubMed
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2-year patient-related versus stent-related outcomes: the SORT OUT IV (Scandinavian Organization for Randomized Trials With Clinical Outcome IV) Trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120892
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2012 Sep 25;60(13):1140-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-25-2012
Author
Lisette Okkels Jensen
Per Thayssen
Evald Høj Christiansen
Hans Henrik Tilsted
Michael Maeng
Knud Nørregaard Hansen
Anne Kaltoft
Henrik Steen Hansen
Hans Erik Bøtker
Lars Romer Krusell
Jan Ravkilde
Morten Madsen
Leif Thuesen
Jens Flensted Lassen
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark. okkels@dadlnet.dk
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2012 Sep 25;60(13):1140-7
Date
Sep-25-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary
Coronary Artery Disease - mortality - therapy
Death
Denmark
Drug-Eluting Stents
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Immunosuppressive Agents - therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - etiology
Myocardial Revascularization - statistics & numerical data
Single-Blind Method
Sirolimus - adverse effects - analogs & derivatives - therapeutic use
Thrombosis - etiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
There are limited head-to-head randomized data on patient-related versus stent-related outcomes for everolimus-eluting stents (EES) and sirolimus-eluting stents (SES).
In the SORT OUT IV (Scandinavian Organization for Randomized Trials With Clinical Outcome IV) trial, comparing the EES with the SES in patients with coronary artery disease, the EES was noninferior to the SES at 9 months.
The primary endpoint was a composite: cardiac death, myocardial infarction (MI), definite stent thrombosis, or target vessel revascularization. Safety and efficacy outcomes at 2 years were further assessed with specific focus on patient-related composite (all death, all MI, or any revascularization) and stent-related composite outcomes (cardiac death, target vessel MI, or symptom-driven target lesion revascularization). A total of 1,390 patients were assigned to receive the EES, and 1,384 patients were assigned to receive the SES.
At 2 years, the composite primary endpoint occurred in 8.3% in the EES group and in 8.7% in the SES group (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.94, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.73 to 1.22). The patient-related outcome: 15.0% in the EES group versus 15.6% in the SES group, (HR: 0.95, 95% CI: 0.78 to 1.15), and the stent-related outcome: 5.2% in the EES group versus 5.3% in the SES group (HR: 0.97, 95% CI: 0.70 to 1.35) did not differ between groups. Rate of definite stent thrombosis was lower in the EES group (0.2% vs. 0.9%, (HR: 0.23, 95% CI: 0.07 to 0.80).
At 2-year follow-up, the EES was found to be noninferior to the SES with regard to both patient-related and stent-related clinical outcomes.
PubMed ID
22958957 View in PubMed
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[2 years experience with patient insurance in Sweden. Fewer notices against nursing staff. 20 million Swedish crowns per year to injured patients].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature249874
Source
Nord Med. 1977 Jun;92(6-7):188-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1977

[3 cases of visceral leishmaniasis, one in a HIV-positive man]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature8254
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1991 May 27;153(22):1591-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-27-1991
Author
U. Balslev
F. Jonsbo
J. Junge
K D Bentsen
Author Affiliation
Hvidovre Hospital, København.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1991 May 27;153(22):1591-2
Date
May-27-1991
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - complications - diagnosis
Adult
English Abstract
HIV Seropositivity - complications - diagnosis
Humans
Infant
Leishmaniasis, Visceral - complications - diagnosis - drug therapy
Male
Opportunistic Infections - etiology
Abstract
Three cases of visceral leishmaniasis (kala-azar) are presented. One of these was in a 43-year-old patient with AIDS who was infected in Southern Spain. Another was in a man aged 25 years infected in West Africa. These cases are the first two adults to be reported in Denmark. The third case was an 18 month old previously healthy boy, infected in Southern Spain. The symptomtology, diagnosis and treatment of the disease are discussed and it is stressed that serological diagnostic tests have limited value in HIV positive patients.
PubMed ID
2058021 View in PubMed
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31927 records – page 1 of 3193.