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29 records – page 1 of 3.

[Analysis of a clinical intervention according to instruments inspired by the ethnopsychiatric approach elaborated by Devereux and Nathan].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170493
Source
Sante Ment Que. 2005;30(2):233-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Marie-Rosaire Tshisekedi-Kalanga
Gisèle Legault
Author Affiliation
Ecole de service social, Université de Montréal.
Source
Sante Ment Que. 2005;30(2):233-55
Date
2005
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cultural Characteristics
Emigration and Immigration
Ethnopsychology
Humans
Intervention Studies
Mental Disorders - ethnology - therapy
Quebec
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
This article analyses a clinical intervention that was carried out at the ethnopsychiatric unit of the Jean-Talon hospital in Montreal. The authors first present an overview of the central concepts of an ethnopsychiatric approach elaborated in France by Nathan in response to mental health problems experienced by immigrants. The authors' intervention is in line with this ethnopsychiatric approach currently being developed in Quebec. The clinical situation is then presented followed by a description of the intervention carried out by the ethnopsychiatric unit. Finally, the authors conclude with an analysis of the situation from various perspectives: psychosocial, psychodynamic (modern etiology) and cultural (traditional etiology).
PubMed ID
16505933 View in PubMed
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Barriers to access to mental health services for ethnic seniors: the Toronto study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180452
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2004 Mar;49(3):192-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2004
Author
Joel Sadavoy
Rosemary Meier
Amoy Yuk Mui Ong
Author Affiliation
Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario. jsadavoy@utoronto.ca
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2004 Mar;49(3):192-9
Date
Mar-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
China - ethnology
Emigration and Immigration
Ethnopsychology
Female
Focus Groups
Geriatric Psychiatry - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data
Health Services for the Aged - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - ethnology - therapy
Mental Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Ontario
Patient Care Team - statistics & numerical data
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Sri Lanka - ethnology
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To identify and describe barriers to access to mental health services encountered by ethnoracial seniors.
A multiracial, multicultural, and multidisciplinary team including a community workgroup worked in partnership with seniors, families, and service providers in urban Toronto Chinese and Tamil communities to develop a broad, stratified sample of participants and to guide the study. This participatory, action-research project used qualitative methodology based on grounded theory to generate areas of inquiry. Each of 17 focus groups applied the same semistructured format and sequence of inquiry.
Key barriers to adequate care include inadequate numbers of trained and acceptable mental health workers, especially psychiatrists; limited awareness of mental disorders among all participants: limited understanding and capacity to negotiate the current system because of systemic barriers and lack of information; disturbance of family support structures; decline in individual self-worth; reliance on ethnospecific social agencies that are not designed or funded for formal mental health care; lack of services that combine ethnoracial, geriatric, and psychiatric care; inadequacy and unacceptability of interpreter services; reluctance of seniors and families to acknowledge mental health problems for fear of rejection and stigma; lack of appropriate professional responses; and inappropriate referral patterns.
There is a clear need for more mental health workers from ethnic backgrounds, especially appropriately trained psychiatrists, and for upgrading the mental health service capacity of frontline agencies through training and core funding. Active community education programs are necessary to counter stigma and improve knowledge of mental disorders and available services. Mainstream services require acceptable and appropriate entry points. Mental health services need to be flexible enough to serve changing populations and to include services specific to ethnic groups, such as providing comprehensive care for seniors.
PubMed ID
15101502 View in PubMed
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A career in culture and psychiatry research: reflections on forty-plus years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135074
Source
Transcult Psychiatry. 2011 Apr;48(1-2):6-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Morton Beiser
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. mail@mortonbeiser.com
Source
Transcult Psychiatry. 2011 Apr;48(1-2):6-23
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Canada
Career Choice
Cultural Diversity
Curriculum
Developing Countries
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology
Ethnopsychology - education - trends
Faculty, Medical
Forecasting
Humans
Internship and Residency
Mental Disorders - ethnology - psychology
Physician's Role - psychology
Prejudice
Refugees - psychology
Research - trends
Risk factors
Social Change
United States
Abstract
The report chronicles a 44-year career in cultural psychiatry spent at Duke, Cornell, Harvard, the University of British Columbia, the University of Toronto, and Ryerson Universities. It describes my studies in a rural community in Nova Scotia, in traditional villages in Senegal, West Africa, on Canadian First Nations reserves and American Indian reservations, in refugee camps in Southeast Asia, among immigrant and refugee communities in Canada, in Ethiopia, and in Israel. The report summarizes major findings resulting from these research efforts, and discusses contributions to theory as well as potential implications for practice as well as policy. The article concludes with reflections about the present state of cultural psychiatry, raises concerns about where the field seems to be in danger of going wrong, and offers suggestions about what needs to be done next.
PubMed ID
21511843 View in PubMed
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[Changed values in chronic psychiatric care].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222909
Source
TVZ. 1992 Oct 8;(19):683-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-8-1992

Comparisons of problems reported by parents of children in 12 cultures: total problems, externalizing, and internalizing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34163
Source
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 1997 Sep;36(9):1269-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1997
Author
A A Crijnen
T M Achenbach
F C Verhulst
Author Affiliation
Sophia Children's Hospital, Erasmus University, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. CRIJNEN@PSYS.AZR.NL
Source
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 1997 Sep;36(9):1269-77
Date
Sep-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Distribution
Analysis of Variance
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - epidemiology
Child Psychiatry - methods
Comparative Study
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Ethnopsychology - methods
Female
Humans
Male
Neurotic Disorders - epidemiology
Parents
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Sampling Studies
Sex Distribution
World Health
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To compare parent-reported problems for children in 12 cultures. METHOD: Child Behavior Checklists were analyzed for 13,697 children and adolescents, aged 6 through 17 years, from general population samples in Australia, Belgium, China, Germany, Greece, Israel, Jamaica, the Netherlands, Puerto Rico, Sweden, Thailand, and the United States. RESULTS: Comparisons of 12 cultures across ages 6 through 11 and 9 cultures across ages 6 through 17 yielded medium effect sizes for cross-cultural variations in Total Problem, Externalizing, and Internalizing scores. Puerto Rican scores were the highest, while Swedish scores were the lowest. With great cross-cultural consistency, Total and Externalizing scores declined with age, while Internalizing scores increased; boys obtained higher Total and Externalizing scores but lower Internalizing scores than girls. Cross-cultural correlations were high among the mean item scores. CONCLUSIONS: Empirically based assessment provides a robust methodology for assessing and comparing problems reported for children from diverse cultures. Age and gender variations are cross-culturally consistent. Although clinical cutoff points should not necessarily be uniform across all cultures, empirically based assessment offers a cost-effective way to identify problems for which children from diverse cultural backgrounds may need help.
PubMed ID
9291729 View in PubMed
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Cross-cultural and intracultural attitudes of Lapp and Norwegian children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature44704
Source
J Soc Psychol. 1967 Oct;73(1):23-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1967

Current research in transcultural psychiatry in the Nordic countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267461
Source
Transcult Psychiatry. 2013 Dec;50(6):841-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Solvig Ekblad
Marianne Carisius Kastrup
Source
Transcult Psychiatry. 2013 Dec;50(6):841-57
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biomedical research
Denmark - ethnology
Ethnopsychology
Finland - ethnology
Humans
Minority Groups - psychology
Norway - ethnology
Refugees - psychology
Sweden - ethnology
Transients and Migrants - psychology
Abstract
This article discusses major themes in recent transcultural psychiatric research in the Nordic countries from 2008 to 2011: (a) epidemiological studies of migration, (b) indigenous populations, and (c) quality of psychiatric care for migrants. Over the past several decades, the populations of the Nordic countries, Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden, which were relatively homogeneous, have become increasingly culturally diverse. Many migrants to Nordic countries have been exposed to extreme stress, such as threats of death and/or torture and other severe social adversities before, during, and after migration, with potential effects on their physical, mental, social, and spiritual health. Growing interest in transcultural issues is reflected in the level of scientific research and clinical activity in the field by Nordic physicians, psychologists, social scientists, demographers, medical anthropologists, as well as other clinicians and policy planners. Research includes work with migrants and indigenous minorities in the Nordic countries, as well as comparisons with mental health in postconflict countries. We conclude by suggesting future directions for transcultural psychiatry research and providing guidelines for the education and training of future clinicians in the Nordic countries.
PubMed ID
24301661 View in PubMed
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The DSM-IV Outline for Cultural Formulation: a critical demonstration with American Indian children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6130
Source
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 1997 Sep;36(9):1244-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1997
Author
D K Novins
D W Bechtold
W H Sack
J. Thompson
D R Carter
S M Manson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, National Center for American Indian and Alaska Native Mental Health Research, Denver, CO, USA.
Source
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 1997 Sep;36(9):1244-51
Date
Sep-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Case Management - standards
Child
Child Custody - methods - standards
Child Psychiatry - standards
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology
Cultural Diversity
Ethnopsychology - methods
Evaluation Studies
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Male
Manuals - standards
Mental Disorders - ethnology
Minority Groups - psychology
Parent-Child Relations - ethnology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology
Professional-Patient Relations
Race Relations
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The publication of DSM-IV is notable for the improved coverage of cultural issues in the diagnosis of mental disorders. In particular, Appendix I of DSM-IV includes an "Outline for Cultural Formulation" (Outline) which assists the clinician in evaluating the impact of an individual's cultural context on diagnosis and treatment. However, the capacity of the Outline to facilitate the development of comprehensive cultural formulations for children and adolescents has not been established. In this article the use of the Outline with American Indian children is reviewed critically. METHOD: Based on the Outline, cultural case formulations for four American Indian children were developed and their comprehensiveness was assessed. RESULTS: Applied to the case material, the Outline provided a clear template for the development of cultural formulations. Nonetheless, several gaps in the material required by the Outline were identified, particularly in the areas concerning cultural identity and cultural elements of the therapeutic relationship. CONCLUSIONS: Clinicians working with children should recognize the strengths as well as the limitations of the Outline and expand their cultural descriptions accordingly. Several additions to the text of the Outline that will facilitate the development of comprehensive cultural formulations specific to children and adolescents are proposed.
PubMed ID
9291726 View in PubMed
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29 records – page 1 of 3.