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36 records – page 1 of 4.

Changing patterns of health and disease among the Aleuts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187203
Source
Arctic Anthropol. 2003;40(1):48-69
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Anne Keenleyside
Source
Arctic Anthropol. 2003;40(1):48-69
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropology - education - history
Arctic regions - ethnology
Disease - economics - ethnology - history - psychology
Epidemiologic Studies
Ethnic Groups - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Health
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
North America - ethnology
Population Groups - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Abstract
Compared to other regions of North America, there have been relatively few paleopathological studies of arctic populations to date, particularly those aimed at elucidating patterns of health and disease prior to contact, and assessing temporal changes in disease patterns. In the present study, four Aleut skeletal samples representing one pre-contact population from Umnak Island in the eastern Aleutian Islands (N=65), and three late pre-contact/early contact period populations from Umnak, Kagamil, and Shiprock Islands (N=227), were examined macroscopically for indicators of health status. The analysis revealed some evidence of declining health in the late pre-contact/early contact period. Statistical comparisons of the earlier and later samples indicated a significantly higher frequency of cribra orbitalia and cranial infection in the later sample compared to the earlier one. Archaeological, epidemiological, and historical data point to several possible explanations for these findings, including the introduction of new pathogens by Europeans.
PubMed ID
21755640 View in PubMed
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Circle of healing: traditional storytelling, part one.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187205
Source
Arctic Anthropol. 2003;40(2):9-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
LouAnn Benson
Source
Arctic Anthropol. 2003;40(2):9-13
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - ethnology
Anthropology - education - history
Complementary Therapies - history
Delivery of Health Care - economics - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence
Ethnic Groups - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Faith Healing - education - history
Folklore
Foundations - history
Health Care Sector - history
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Indians, North American - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Medicine, Traditional - history
Abstract
The session began with three presenters - LouAnn Benson, Walter Porter, and Lisa Dolchok - all of whom are or have been affiliated with the Circle of Healing Program at Southcentral Foundation in Anchorage, Alaska. The Southcentral Foundation is a Native Health Corporation that administers what used to be the Indian Health Service Hospital and Medical Center. In the Circle of Healing Program, the Southcentral Foundation has designed and implemented an approach to health care that allows its patients simultaneously to access Western medicine, traditional Native healing, and other alternative approaches to health care, such as acupuncture. An important figure in this effort is Dr. Robert Morgan, a psychologist who has worked with the program for several years, and who helped suggest presenters for this part of the program. Originally, Bob planned to be present in Quebec City, but family priorities meant a change in plans. Bob's absence had a silver lining, however, because in his stead he sent LouAnn Benson, one of his able colleagues, who talked about the program from the perspective of an insider.
PubMed ID
21755638 View in PubMed
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Circle of healing: traditional storytelling, part three.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187200
Source
Arctic Anthropol. 2003;40(2):19-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Lisa Dolchok
Source
Arctic Anthropol. 2003;40(2):19-22
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - ethnology
Complementary Therapies - economics - education - history
Credentialing - economics - history - legislation & jurisprudence
Ethnic Groups - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Faith Healing - education - history
Folklore
Foundations - economics - history
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Indians, North American - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Medicine, Traditional - history
Abstract
Southcentral Foundation had to overcome several organizational and procedural hurdles when developing their Circle of Healing program. Among these hurdles was finding a way to credential Alaska Native healers so the Foundation could be reimbursed for their services and pay the healers, and so the healers could work in the hospital along with the staff delivering Western and alternative medical treatment. Southcentral Foundation chose to develop a process for certifying Alaska Native healers as tribal doctors. Rita Blumenstein is the first such person to be certified. Lisa Dolchok is the second. An important strength of Lisa’s presentation is that she helps us broaden our understanding of healing from an Alaska Native perspective. So often we equate healing with curing, and while it can have this dimension, Lisa reminds us there is much more to it. She echoes LouAnn Benson’s presentation in asserting that healing can address illness of the spirit or wounds to the soul.
PubMed ID
21761620 View in PubMed
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Circle of healing: traditional storytelling, part two.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187204
Source
Arctic Anthropol. 2003;40(2):14-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Walter Porter
Source
Arctic Anthropol. 2003;40(2):14-8
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropology - education - history
Arctic regions - ethnology
Ethnic Groups - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Faith Healing - education - history
Folklore
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
History, Ancient
Humans
Indians, North American - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Medicine, Traditional - history
Religion - history
Abstract
For decades, Bible stories have been a source of both conflict and healing. In earlier days, Christian missionaries often went to considerable lengths to question the accuracy of traditional northern Native stories, especially those with supernatural dimensions, and to discredit traditional Native spiritual leaders, such as medicine men and women, angakoks, and shamans. The missionaries’ efforts often undercut Native culture and sometimes contributed to the intergenerational trauma that creates widespread hurt and pain in northern Native communities today. At the same time, a significant number of northern Native people derive considerable solace and support from their Christian beliefs and church affiliations, and many Christian religious organizations active in the North today no longer oppose traditional Native stories, practices, and values. Many northern Native people recognize that there is great value in both Native stories and the stories found in the Bible, but some still feel a tension in trying to reconcile acceptance of both. In his presentation, Walter Porter provided an interesting perspective on this issue, and his approach has considerable potential for healing.
PubMed ID
21755639 View in PubMed
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Cultural dissimilarity and intermarriage. a longitudinal study of immigrants in Sweden, 1990–2005.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129785
Source
Int Migr Rev. 2011;45(2):297-324
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Martin Dribe
Christer Lundh
Author Affiliation
Lund University.
Source
Int Migr Rev. 2011;45(2):297-324
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cultural Diversity
Emigrants and Immigrants - education - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Ethnic Groups - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Marriage - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Population Groups - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Social Conditions - economics - history - legislation & jurisprudence
Social Identification
Social Values - ethnology - history
Spouses - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Sweden - ethnology
Abstract
Intermarriage with natives is a key indicator of immigrant integration. This article studies intermarriage for 138 immigrant groups in Sweden, using longitudinal individual level data. It shows great variation in marriage patterns across immigrant populations, ranging from over 70 percent endogamy in some immigrants groups to below 5 percent in other groups. Although part of this variation is explained by human capital and the structure of the marriage market, cultural factors (values, religion, and language) play an important role as well. Immigrants from culturally more dissimilar countries are less likely to intermarry with natives, and instead more prone to endogamy.
PubMed ID
22069769 View in PubMed
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The declining retirement prospects of immigrant men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140128
Source
Can Public Policy. 2010;36(3):287-305
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Derek Hum
Wayne Simpson
Source
Can Public Policy. 2010;36(3):287-305
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - ethnology
Cost-Benefit Analysis - economics - history - legislation & jurisprudence
Emigrants and Immigrants - education - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Emigration and Immigration - history - legislation & jurisprudence
Employment - economics - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Ethnic Groups - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Government Programs - economics - education - history - legislation & jurisprudence
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Income - history
Men - education - psychology
Men's Health - ethnology - history
Retirement - economics - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Social Conditions - economics - history - legislation & jurisprudence
Social Security - economics - history - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
We compare the retirement prospects of immigrant men with their native-born counterparts. Using data from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics, we estimate a significant gap of 43 percent in private pension income and 30 percent in private pension contributions between immigrants and the native born. The gap in public pension incomes is negligible and reduces the overall pension gap, but only partially. Furthermore, the pension income and contribution gap is significantly larger for more recently arrived immigrant cohorts, consistent with evidence of weaker earnings for this group. We provide age profiles of pension income and contributions and discuss problems in interpreting the results without adjusting for age. Controlling for age and earnings differences, immigrants are still about 11 percent less likely to make contributions to a private pension program, but there is no difference in the contribution rates out of earnings of those who contribute. Recently arrived immigrants are significantly less likely to make contributions to a private pension program and appear to be neglecting private pension contribution opportunities more than earlier immigrants and the native born, which may have adverse implications for Canada's public retirement programs.
PubMed ID
20939137 View in PubMed
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The effect of ethnicity and economy upon intergenerational coresidence: northern Norway during the last part of the nineteenth century.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131541
Source
J Fam Hist. 2011;36(3):263-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Hilde L Jåstad
Author Affiliation
University of Tromsø, Norway.
Source
J Fam Hist. 2011;36(3):263-85
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Censuses - history
Ethnic Groups - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
History, 19th Century
Housekeeping - economics - history
Housing for the Elderly - economics - history - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Intergenerational Relations - ethnology
Life Style - ethnology - history
Norway - ethnology
Residence Characteristics - history
Socioeconomic Factors - history
Wills - economics - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Abstract
During the last part of the nineteenth century, Finnmark province and the northern part of Troms experienced a decline in intergenerational coresidence. This article discusses what impact ethnic affiliation and economic activity had on the living arrangements of the elderly, and what contributed to the change. Logistic regression shows that ethnicity played a role but its effect disappears after controlling for economic activity. Intergenerational coresidence was positively associated with being a married Sámi male with an occupation in farming or combined fishing and farming. As such a person grew older, he was increasingly likely to live separately from an own adult child. This pattern changed toward the end of nineteenth century. By the close of the century, ethnic differences had disappeared, and headship position, irrespective of marital status, was strongly related to coresidence.
PubMed ID
21898962 View in PubMed
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36 records – page 1 of 4.