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25 years or more after spinal cord injury: clinical conditions of individuals in the Florence and Stockholm areas.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129470
Source
Spinal Cord. 2012 Mar;50(3):243-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
L. Werhagen
S. Aito
L. Tucci
J. Strayer
C. Hultling
Author Affiliation
Karolinska institutet Danderyds Sjukhus, Department of clinical sciences, Division of Rehabilitation Medicine, Danderyds hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. lars.werhagen @ki.se
Source
Spinal Cord. 2012 Mar;50(3):243-6
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls
Accidents, Traffic
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Ethnic Groups
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Italy
Length of Stay
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Spinal Cord Injuries - complications - etiology - therapy
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Retrospective analysis and retrospective follow-up.
Spinal cord injury (SCI) patients have today a nearly normal lifespan. Avoidance of medical complications is key to this end. The aim of the study was to analyse health in individuals surviving 25 years or more after traumatic SCI in Stockholm and Florence, and compare medical complications.
Data from the databases of the Spinal Unit of Florence and from the Spinalis, Stockholm were analysed. Patients included were C2-L 2, American Spinal Cord Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale (AIS) A-C, and =25 years post traumatic SCI. Patients underwent a thorough neurological and general examination, and were interviewed about medical events during those years. Analysed data include: gender, age at injury, current age, neurological level, AIS, cause of injury, presence of neuropathic pain (NP), and spasticity and medical complications.
A total of 66 Italian patients and 74 Swedish patients were included. The only statistical difference between the groups was cause of injury due to falls was higher in the Florence group (P
PubMed ID
22105457 View in PubMed
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[44 cases of Hemophilus influenzae in the Laval University Hospital Center (1975-1979)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244381
Source
Union Med Can. 1981 Jul;110(7):611-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1981

Abandoning "the other": statistical enumeration of Swedish Sami, 1700 to 1945 and beyond.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135562
Source
Ber Wiss. 2010 Sep;33(3):263-79
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Per Axelsson
Author Affiliation
Umeå University, Centre for Sami Research, Umeå, Sweden. per.axelsson@cesam.umu.se
Source
Ber Wiss. 2010 Sep;33(3):263-79
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Censuses - history
Ethnic groups - history
History, 18th Century
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Population Dynamics
Population Groups - history
Sweden
Abstract
Sweden has one of the world's most eminent and exhaustive records of statistical information on its population. As early as the eighteenth century, ethnic notations were being made in parish registers throughout the country, and by the early nineteenth century a specific category for the Sami population had been added to the forms used to collect data for the Tabellverket (National Population Statistics). Beginning in 1860, the Sami were also counted in the first official census of the Swedish state. Nonetheless--and in contrast to many other countries--Sweden today lacks separate statistical information not only about its sole recognized indigenous population but also about other ethnic groups. The present paper investigates Sweden's attempts to enumerate its indigenous Sami population prior to World War II and the cessation of ethnic enumeration after the war. How have the Sami been identified and enumerated? How have statistical categories been constructed, and how have they changed over time? The aim of this essay is not to assess the validity of the demographic sources. Instead the paper will explore the historical, social, and cultural factors that have had a bearing on how a dominant administrative structure has dealt with the statistical construct of an indigenous population.
PubMed ID
21466142 View in PubMed
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Abbreviated techniques for assessing mental health in interview surveys: an example from central Montréal.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature111496
Source
Laval Med. 1967 Jan;38(1):58-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1967

Abnormal regulation of the LDL-R and HMG CoA reductase genes in subjects with familial hypercholesterolemia with the "French Canadian mutation".

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211598
Source
Atherosclerosis. 1996 Jul;124(1):103-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1996
Author
L. Yu
S. Qiu
J. Genest
Author Affiliation
Cardiovascular Genetics Laboratory, Clinical Research Institute of Montréal, Québec Canada.
Source
Atherosclerosis. 1996 Jul;124(1):103-17
Date
Jul-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anticholesteremic Agents - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Canada - epidemiology
Cells, Cultured
Enzyme Induction
Enzyme Inhibitors - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Ethnic Groups - genetics
Female
Fibroblasts - metabolism
France - ethnology
Gene Expression Regulation - drug effects
Haploidy
Humans
Hydroxymethylglutaryl CoA Reductases - genetics
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors
Hyperlipoproteinemia Type II - drug therapy - ethnology - genetics
Lipoproteins, LDL - metabolism
Lovastatin - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Male
Prevalence
RNA, Messenger - biosynthesis - genetics
Receptors, LDL - genetics - metabolism
Sequence Deletion
Transcription, Genetic
Treatment Failure
Abstract
Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is seen with high frequency in the province of Québec, Canada. A large deletion (> 10 kb) of the 5'-end of the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) gene is the major mutation of the LDL-R in FH subjects in Québec (approximately 60% of FH subjects). No mRNA is produced from the allele bearing the mutation, and cellular cholesterol obtained by receptor-mediated endocytosis is under the control of the non-deletion allele. We have previously reported that some patients with the 10-kb deletion (approximately 9%) fail to respond to the hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMG CoA reductase) inhibitor class of medications. We studied mRNA levels of the LDL-R and HMG CoA reductase genes in response to the HMG CoA reductase inhibitor lovastatin in a time- and dose-dependent fashion in cultured human skin fibroblasts and we devised an in vitro model to study the response to drug therapy in subjects with FH. We determined mRNA levels by RNase protection assay in skin fibroblasts obtained from controls (n = 3) and FH subjects with the > 10-kb deletion (responders, n = 3; non responders, n = 3; to drug therapy). We measured 125I-LDL binding on skin fibroblasts grown in the presence of lipoprotein-deficient serum with or without 1 microM lovastatin, using 10 micrograms/mL of 125I-LDL protein. Control subjects exhibited coordinate regulation of the LDL-R and HMG CoA reductase genes in response to lovastatin, 0.1-25 microM, for 0-24 h. Correlation coefficients between mRNA levels of both genes were > 0.9 in controls and FH subjects. However, by linear regression analysis, the corresponding slopes for the correlation between both genes were 0.98 (controls), 3.36 and 3.63 (FH responders and non-responders), indicating a pattern of dissociated but still coordinate regulation in FH subjects. The magnitude of increase of mRNA levels of the LDL-R gene was approximately five-fold over LPDS in controls, two-fold in FH responders and two-fold in non-responders. Binding studies using 125I-LDL reveal that a control subject and all responders had a 2-2.5-fold increase in binding to cell surface receptors but two out of three FH non-responders showed no increase in binding in response to 1 microM lovastatin. The LDL-R and HMG CoA reductase genes are expressed in coordinate regulation in fibroblasts from subjects with FH due to the > 10-kb deletion, but with a proportionately greater up-regulation of the HMG CoA reductase gene. Some subjects, with FH caused by the > 10-kb deletion of the LDL-R gene, who fail to respond to HMG CoA reductase inhibitors have abnormal LDL receptor binding activity at the cell surface in response to lovastatin in vitro.
PubMed ID
8800498 View in PubMed
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[ABO blood group and the rhesus classification of urolithiasis patients].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature239142
Source
Urol Nefrol (Mosk). 1985 Mar-Apr;(2):14-6
Publication Type
Article

Aboriginal community-centered injury surveillance: a community-based participatory process evaluation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129138
Source
Prev Sci. 2012 Apr;13(2):107-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Mariana Brussoni
Lise L Olsen
Pamela Joshi
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia, BC Injury Research & Prevention Unit, L408 - 4480 Oak Street, Vancouver, BC V6H 3V4, Canada. mbrussoni@cw.bc.ca
Source
Prev Sci. 2012 Apr;13(2):107-17
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia - epidemiology
Ethnic Groups
Focus Groups
Humans
Leadership
Population Surveillance
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology
Abstract
While injuries are a leading health concern for Aboriginal populations, injury rates and types vary substantially across bands. The uniqueness of Aboriginal communities highlights the importance of collecting community-level injury surveillance data to assist with identifying local injury patterns, setting priorities for action and evaluating programs. Secwepemc First Nations communities in British Columbia, Canada, implemented the Injury Surveillance Project using the Aboriginal Community-Centered Injury Surveillance System. This paper presents findings from a community-based participatory process evaluation of the Injury Surveillance Project. Qualitative data collection methods were informed by OCAP (Ownership, Control, Access, and Possession) principles and included focus groups, interviews and document review. Results focused on lessons learned through the planning, implementation and management of the Injury Surveillance Project identifying lessons related to: project leadership and staff, training, project funding, initial project outcomes, and community readiness. Key findings included the central importance of a community-based and paced approach guided by OCAP principles, the key role of leadership and project champions, and the strongly collaborative relationships between the project communities. Findings may assist with successful implementation of community-based health surveillance in other settings and with other health issues and illustrate another path to self-determination for Aboriginal communities. The evaluation methods represent an example of a collaborative community-driven approach guided by OCAP principles necessary for work with Aboriginal communities.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22138890 View in PubMed
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2249 records – page 1 of 225.