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106 records – page 1 of 11.

[A course in medical ethics--a pain in the neck for the clinicians?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208988
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Mar 20;117(8):1138-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-20-1997
Author
R. Førde
S. Lie
O G Aasland
Author Affiliation
Legeforeningens forskningsinstitutt, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Mar 20;117(8):1138-40
Date
Mar-20-1997
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Education, Medical, Continuing
Ethics, Medical
Humans
Norway
Pediatrics - education - manpower
Questionnaires
Abstract
Last year, a course in clinical medical ethics for paediatricians had to be cancelled owing to lack of interest. To find the reason for this, and to learn what ethical problems the physicians encountered in the course of their work, how they solved them, and their attitude towards education in medical ethics, a questionnaire was sent to all members of The Norwegian Paediatric Association, to be answered anonymously. The most frequent excuses for not attending the course were pressure of work and lack of time. 37% claimed that they very often or often encountered ethical problems during their work. 20% often solved these problems alone, and two out of three after discussing them with colleagues. 51% felt a need to improve their competence to solve ethical problems. Only 16% reported having no such need. The authors discuss the form and content of the education in medical ethics.
PubMed ID
9148483 View in PubMed
Less detail

Active euthanasia: should polls be action guides?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220935
Source
CMAJ. 1993 Jun 1;148(11):1889-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1-1993
Author
J S Senn
Source
CMAJ. 1993 Jun 1;148(11):1889-90
Date
Jun-1-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Attitude of Health Personnel
Ethics, Medical
Euthanasia
Humans
Questionnaires
Notes
Cites: JAMA. 1988 Apr 8;259(14):2139-403346989
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 1992 Oct;152(10):1973-61417370
Cites: J Med Ethics. 1992 Sep;18 Suppl:1-231357177
Cites: Lancet. 1991 Sep 14;338(8768):669-741715962
Cites: Science. 1981 Jan 30;211(4481):453-87455683
Comment On: CMAJ. 1993 Jun 1;148(11):1921-68500029
Comment On: CMAJ. 1993 Jun 1;148(11):1929-338500030
PubMed ID
8500025 View in PubMed
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Alberta Euthanasia Survey: 3-year follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211005
Source
CMAJ. 1996 Oct 1;155(7):885-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1-1996
Author
M J Verhoef
T D Kinsella
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Alta. mverhoef@acs.ucalgary.ca
Source
CMAJ. 1996 Oct 1;155(7):885-90
Date
Oct-1-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alberta
Attitude of Health Personnel
Ethics, Medical
Euthanasia - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Euthanasia, Active
Euthanasia, Active, Voluntary
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Physicians - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Random Allocation
Social Change
Suicide, Assisted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
Abstract
To determine whether the opinions of Alberta physicians about active euthanasia had changed and to assess the determinants of potential changes in opinion.
Follow-up survey (mailed questionnaire) of physicians included in the 1991 Alberta Euthanasia Survey.
Alberta.
Of the 1391 physicians who participated in the 1991 survey 1291 (93%) had indicated that they were willing to take part in a follow-up survey. A follow-up questionnaire was mailed in 1994 to 1146 physicians who could be traced through the 1994 Medical Directory of the provincial college of physicians and surgeons; 25 questionnaires were returned because they could not be delivered.
Physicians' opinions about (a) the morality of active euthanasia, (b) changes in the law to permit active euthanasia and (c) the practice of legalized euthanasia.
Of the 1121 physicians sent a follow-up questionnaire 866 (77%) returned it completed. The responses of these same 866 physicians in 1991 provided a basis for comparison. Of the 866, 360 (42%) stated in the 1994 survey that it is sometimes right to practise active euthanasia; a similar proportion (384 [44%]) gave this response in 1991. However, other opinions changed significantly. In 1991, 250 of the respondents (29%) indicated that they would practise active euthanasia if it were legalized, as compared with 128 (15%) in 1994 (p
Notes
Cites: CMAJ. 1993 Mar 15;148(6):1015-78292108
Cites: CMAJ. 1993 Apr 15;148(8):1293-78462050
Cites: CMAJ. 1993 May 1;148(9):1463-67682892
Cites: CMAJ. 1993 May 15;148(10):1699-7028485674
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1994 Jul 14;331(2):89-948208272
Cites: CMAJ. 1993 Jun 1;148(11):1921-68500029
Cites: CMAJ. 1993 Jun 1;148(11):1929-338500030
Cites: CMAJ. 1994 Mar 1;150(5):701-88313289
Cites: CMAJ. 1993 Jun 1;148(11):1895-98500026
PubMed ID
8837535 View in PubMed
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Analysis of clinical bioethics teaching in pediatric surgery residency.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206321
Source
J Pediatr Surg. 1998 Feb;33(2):373-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1998
Author
M L Robin
D A Caniano
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, and Children's Hospital, Columbus 43205, USA.
Source
J Pediatr Surg. 1998 Feb;33(2):373-7
Date
Feb-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Bioethics
Canada
Child
Curriculum
Ethics, Medical - education
Female
General Surgery - education
Humans
Infant
Internship and Residency
Male
Pediatrics - education
Physicians - psychology
Questionnaires
Teaching - methods
United States
Abstract
Although clinical bioethics teaching (CBT) is not a required component of the essential curriculum for pediatric surgery residency, ethical considerations often accompany surgical decision making for infants and children. This study was designed to quantitate CBT during pediatric surgery residency (PSR) and to determine preferences about formal bioethics instruction.
An 80-item questionnaire was mailed to 140 graduates of accredited PSR in the United States and Canada. Questions included demographic data, experience in CBT during and after PSR, preferred topics and teaching methods, and self-assessed and objective competency in bioethics.
The response rate was 78% (n = 109); 72% completed PSR between 1990 and 1995 (mean, 1991). Formal CBT within the curriculum of PSR was reported by 9% of respondents; lecture and consultation with an ethicist were the most frequent teaching methods. Informal CBT was noted by 88% of pediatric surgeons; observation of patient cases with ethical dilemmas was the primary mode of instruction. Quality of life, withholding/withdrawal of care, informed consent, child abuse, and economics ranked highest for most important CBT topics, while euthanasia, clinical research trials, and cultural diversity were given low priority. The preferred teaching methods were case-based discussions and consultation with an ethicist. Although 97% favored additional CBT in all postgraduate training, respondents who completed advanced study in medical ethics (P
PubMed ID
9498421 View in PubMed
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[An inquiry shows that guidelines on patient participation in clinical training are necessary].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222584
Source
Lakartidningen. 1992 Dec 9;89(50):4407-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-9-1992
Author
N. Lynöe
M. Sandlund
Author Affiliation
Institutionerna för psykiatri och socialmedicin, Umeå universitet.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1992 Dec 9;89(50):4407-9
Date
Dec-9-1992
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Education, Medical, Continuing
Ethics, Medical
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Informed consent
Patient compliance
Physician-Patient Relations
Questionnaires
Students, Medical - psychology
Sweden
PubMed ID
1469983 View in PubMed
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An international survey of death education trends in faculties of nursing and medicine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209306
Source
Death Stud. 1997 Mar-Apr;21(2):177-88
Publication Type
Article
Author
B. Downe-Wamboldt
D. Tamlyn
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.
Source
Death Stud. 1997 Mar-Apr;21(2):177-88
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Curriculum
Death
Education, Medical - trends
Education, Nursing - trends
Ethics, Medical
Great Britain
Humans
Questionnaires
Social Work - education - trends
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to identify and describe the availability of death education, including teaching and evaluation methods, specific content areas, issues being addressed, and the background and expertise of the faculty members involved in teaching death and dying content. A questionnaire was developed based on the current literature and sent to 80 faculties of nursing and 36 faculties of medicine in Canada and the United Kingdom. The majority of nursing and medical schools that responded to the survey included death education, an integrated approach, through all years of their programs. Despite recent criticisms of Kubler-Ross's model of grieving, the majority of programs reported using her theory most frequently. The findings identify the current status of death education for health professionals in Canada and the United Kingdom, and implications for curriculum changes are discussed.
PubMed ID
10169690 View in PubMed
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[An unethical and unscientific survey on environmental health effects]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49280
Source
Lakartidningen. 1995 Mar 8;92(10):958
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-8-1995
Author
I. Hellström
Source
Lakartidningen. 1995 Mar 8;92(10):958
Date
Mar-8-1995
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Environmental health
Epidemiologic Methods
Ethics, Medical
Health Surveys
Humans
Questionnaires
Sweden
PubMed ID
7885093 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A social and psychological portrait of a specialist working in a psychiatric institutions].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115235
Source
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 2013;113(1):30-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013

[Aspects of legal interruption of pregnancy with the emphasis on patient information].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature246899
Source
Katilolehti. 1979 Sep;84(9):358-65 contd
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1979

[A Swedish inquiry on organ donation and transplantation. Two-thirds of the population are prepared to be organ donors. One-third of the population informed their relatives]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73840
Source
Lakartidningen. 1989 Oct 25;86(43):3681-3, 3686-7, 3690-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-25-1989

106 records – page 1 of 11.