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Bioethics for clinicians: 14. Ethics and genetics in medicine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205484
Source
CMAJ. 1998 May 19;158(10):1309-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-19-1998
Author
M M Burgess
C M Laberge
B M Knoppers
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia, Centre for Applied Ethics, Vancouver.
Source
CMAJ. 1998 May 19;158(10):1309-13
Date
May-19-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Confidentiality
Duty to Warn
Ethics, Medical
Genetic Counseling - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Genetic Privacy
Genetic Testing - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Humans
Informed consent
Referral and Consultation
Abstract
Information about a patient's inherited risk of disease has important ethical and legal implications in clinical practice. Because genetic information is by nature highly personal yet familial, issues of confidentiality arise. Counselling and informed consent before testing are important in view of the social and psychological risks that accompany testing, the complexity of information surrounding testing, and the fact that effective interventions are often not available. Follow-up counselling is also important to help patients integrate test results into their lives and the lives of their relatives. Genetic counselling should be provided by practitioners who have up-to-date knowledge of the genetics of and the tests available for specific diseases, are aware of the social and psychological risks associated with testing, and are able to provide appropriate clinical follow-up. Some physicians may elect to refer patients for genetic counselling and testing. However, it is inevitable that all physicians will be involved in long-term follow-up both by monitoring for disease and by supporting the integration of genetic information into patients' lives.
Notes
Cites: IRB. 1997 May-Aug;19(3-4):1-1311656943
Cites: Health Law J. 1995;3:59-13010569883
Cites: Fam Process. 1989 Mar;28(1):59-682522897
Cites: CMAJ. 1989 May 1;140(9):1023-82565159
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1992 Nov 12;327(20):1449-511406861
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1994 May 19;330(20):1401-68159192
Cites: Alzheimer Dis Assoc Disord. 1994;8(2):71-88060609
Cites: Am J Hum Genet. 1994 Oct;55(4):606-177942838
Cites: Am J Hum Genet. 1994 Oct;55(4):618-257942839
Cites: Am J Med Genet. 1994 Sep 15;54(3):174-847810575
Cites: Am J Med Genet. 1995 May 22;57(1):46-517645597
Cites: JAMA. 1995 Dec 13;274(22):1806-77500515
Cites: Am J Med Genet. 1996 Mar 1;62(1):6-98779327
Cites: CMAJ. 1996 Aug 15;155(4):387-918752063
Cites: CMAJ. 1996 Jul 15;155(2):177-808800075
Cites: CMAJ. 1997 Feb 15;156(4):521-49054822
Cites: CMAJ. 1997 Apr 15;156(8):1153-79141987
Cites: Health Law Can. 1997 Aug;18(1):3-1410178192
Cites: Health Law J. 1995;3:19-5710569876
Comment In: CMAJ. 1998 Nov 3;159(9):1085, 10879835875
PubMed ID
9614824 View in PubMed
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[Both personal values and facts talk against artificial insemination by donor]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65843
Source
Lakartidningen. 1980 Sep 17;77(38):3242
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-17-1980

Bridging the professions: an integrated and interdisciplinary approach to teaching health care ethics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214024
Source
Acad Med. 1995 Nov;70(11):1002-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1995
Author
A. Browne
C. Carpenter
C. Cooledge
G. Drover
J. Ericksen
D. Fielding
D. Hill
J. Johnston
S. Segal
J. Silver
Author Affiliation
Division of Health Care Ethics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver (UBC), Canada.
Source
Acad Med. 1995 Nov;70(11):1002-5
Date
Nov-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Confidentiality
Curriculum
Decision Making
Education, Medical
Educational Measurement
Ethics, Medical
Goals
Health Care Rationing
Humans
Informed consent
Interdisciplinary Communication
Interprofessional Relations
Motivation
Patient Advocacy
Patient care team
Patient Participation
Professional Autonomy
Program Evaluation
Students, Medical
Teaching - methods
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
In 1993, the authors introduced an interdisciplinary course in health care ethics at the University of British Columbia. They were motivated by two convictions: (1) an interdisciplinary approach to health care decision making is best; and (2) every significant health care decision has an ethical component. They wanted to encourage students from the various health care disciplines to participate in interdisciplinary decision making in their future practices by giving them an opportunity to study health care ethics together during their training. The authors give detailed descriptions of the objectives, format, curriculum, and evaluation of this innovative course in the hope that other educators who may want to develop similar courses can learn from their experience.
PubMed ID
7575927 View in PubMed
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[Children of hiding refugees shall have the right to medical care!]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35274
Source
Lakartidningen. 1995 Jun 7;92(23):2374
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-7-1995

CMA Code of Ethics: time for a change!

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226599
Source
CMAJ. 1991 Apr 1;144(7):855-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1-1991
Author
G G Griener
Author Affiliation
Division of Biomedical Ethics and Humanities, University of Alberta, Edmonton.
Source
CMAJ. 1991 Apr 1;144(7):855-7
Date
Apr-1-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Confidentiality
Ethics, Medical
HIV Seropositivity - diagnosis
Humans
Morals
Physician's Role
Societies, Medical - standards
Notes
Cites: CMAJ. 1990 Apr 1;142(7):75211659242
PubMed ID
2007236 View in PubMed
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Conducting health research with vulnerable women: issues and strategies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191520
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2001 Dec;33(3):81-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2001
Author
M. Heaman
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, Helen Glass Centre for Nursing, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada. maureen_heaman@umanitoba.ca
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2001 Dec;33(3):81-6
Date
Dec-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aging
Canada
Clinical Trials as Topic
Confidentiality
Emigration and Immigration
Ethics, Medical
Female
Homosexuality, Female
Humans
Indians, North American
Minority Groups
Patient Selection
Refugees
Reproducibility of Results
Research Design
Risk factors
Rural Population
Social Class
Women's health
Abstract
This paper has summarized a variety of methodological and ethical issues in conducting research with vulnerable women, and has also proposed strategies for dealing with these issues. Because vulnerable women are at increased risk for health problems, it is imperative that nurses and other health-care professionals make strenuous efforts to include vulnerable women in health research.
PubMed ID
11845625 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Laeknabladid. 2006 Mar;92(3):183
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2006
Author
Jón Snaedal
Source
Laeknabladid. 2006 Mar;92(3):183
Date
Mar-2006
Language
Icelandic
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Codes of Ethics
Confidentiality
Death
Ethics, Medical
Humans
Iceland
International Cooperation
PubMed ID
16520489 View in PubMed
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[Confidentiality in HIV-infection/AIDS--a comment on the Communicable Disease Control Act]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7886
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1995 May 10;115(12):1521-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-10-1995
Author
J C Frich
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1995 May 10;115(12):1521-3
Date
May-10-1995
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Communicable Disease Control - legislation & jurisprudence
Confidentiality
English Abstract
Ethics, Medical
HIV Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
HIV Seropositivity - epidemiology - psychology
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Abstract
The new Communicable Diseases Control Act has come into force in Norway. It makes it compulsory for a physician to warn a third party if it is obvious that a HIV-positive patient, with a high degree of certainty, puts the third party at risk of being infected with HIV. Some philosophers characterize medical confidentiality as an intransigent and absolute obligation, others as a prima facie duty. This article supports the latter view, but the author still argues that strict conditions have to be fulfilled before a physician should consider breaking medical confidentiality: The doctor must try repeatedly to gain the consent or co-operation of the patient involved. Possible negative long-term consequences for the preventive HIV-work support strict medical confidentiality.
PubMed ID
7770859 View in PubMed
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Confidentiality of medical information: a study of Albertan family physicians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature232936
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1988 Jun;34:1301-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1988
Author
Gerald L Higgins
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1988 Jun;34:1301-6
Date
Jun-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alberta
Altruism
Attitude
Beneficence
Codes of Ethics
Confidentiality
Contraception
Data Collection
Deception
Decision Making
Disclosure
Ethics, Medical
Ethics, Professional
Family
Family Practice
Female
Freedom
Health
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Hippocratic Oath
Humans
Life Style
Men
Parental Notification
Parents
Paternalism
Personal Autonomy
Physician-Patient Relations
Physicians
Sexuality
Spouses
Women
Abstract
The author of this paper examines physicians' regard for the confidentiality of medical information in the light of their perception of their own role. Five case studies of increasing complexity of medical management and ethical issues, derived from practice and accompanied by questions relating to confidentiality and medical management, were submitted to randomly selected family physicians in Alberta. Analysis of the replies to determine attitudes to confidentiality and how the respondents perceived patients' best interests, and statements of how they would act in certain situations, disclosed that a substantial minority of the physicians were still prepared to breach confidentiality and exercise Hippocratic professional judgement in certain situations. The bases of confidentiality of medical information are reviewed, together with changing modes of medical ethics and the increasing trend to rights derived from patients, autonomy, and the ways in which these factors may affect the physician-patient relationship.
Notes
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1982 Dec 9;307(24):1518-217144818
Cites: J Med Ethics. 1986 Sep;12(3):117-223761330
PubMed ID
11660314 View in PubMed
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57 records – page 1 of 6.