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76 records – page 1 of 8.

Achieving closure through disclosure: experience in a pediatric institution.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180246
Source
J Pediatr. 2004 May;144(5):559-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2004

Administrative decision making in response to sudden health care agency funding reductions: is there a role for ethics?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204203
Source
Nurs Ethics. 1998 Jul;5(4):319-29
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1998
Author
D M Wilson
Source
Nurs Ethics. 1998 Jul;5(4):319-29
Date
Jul-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Cost Control
Decision Making, Organizational
Ethics, Institutional
Financing, Government - organization & administration
Health Facility Administrators - psychology
Humans
Questionnaires
Resource Allocation
Abstract
In October 1993, a survey of health care agency administrators was undertaken shortly after they had experienced two sudden reductions in public funding. The purpose of this investigation was to gain insight into the role of ethics in health administrator decision making. A mail questionnaire was designed for this purpose. Descriptive statistics and content analysis were used to summarize the data. Staff reductions and bed closures were the two most frequently reported mechanisms for addressing the funding reductions. Most administrators did not believe that these changes would have a negative public impact. In contrast, the majority indicated that future changes in reaction to additional funding reductions would have a negative public impact. Approximately one-third of the administrators reported ethics to be an element of recent administrative decision making, and one-half could foresee that ethics would be important in the future if reductions continued. These findings are discussed in relation to ethics. Issues for additional research are outlined.
PubMed ID
9782919 View in PubMed
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An analysis of the ethical and linguistic content of hospital mission statements.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169515
Source
Health Care Manage Rev. 2006 Apr-Jun;31(2):92-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
William E Smythe
David C Malloy
Thomas Hadjistavropoulos
Ronald R Martin
Holly A Bardutz
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada.
Source
Health Care Manage Rev. 2006 Apr-Jun;31(2):92-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Codes of Ethics
Empathy
Ethics, Institutional
Hospital Administration - ethics
Humans
Linguistics
Moral Obligations
Organizational Culture
Organizational Objectives
Organizational Policy
Patient Care - ethics - psychology
Writing
Abstract
An analysis of the ethical and functional linguistic content of Canadian hospital mission statements was conducted. The ethical content analysis identified deontology as the dominant ethical orientation. The functional linguistic analysis revealed a trend toward the depersonalization and objectification of action. Implications for formulating effective mission statements were discussed.
PubMed ID
16648688 View in PubMed
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An ethical dilemma for the clinician manager.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229113
Source
Dimens Health Serv. 1990 May;67(4):15-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1990
Author
W J Sibbald
A. Lynch
Author Affiliation
Richard Ivey Critical Care Trauma Centre, Victoria Hospital Corporation.
Source
Dimens Health Serv. 1990 May;67(4):15-7
Date
May-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Budgets
Cost Control
Ethics
Ethics, Institutional
Female
Humans
Intensive Care Units - utilization
Male
Ontario
Patient Admission - economics
Patient Selection
Resource Allocation
PubMed ID
2373277 View in PubMed
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The associations among the ethical climate, the professional practice environment and individualized care in care settings for older people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258590
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2014 Jun;70(6):1356-68
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Riitta Suhonen
Minna Stolt
Marja-Liisa Gustafsson
Jouko Katajisto
Andreas Charalambous
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2014 Jun;70(6):1356-68
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cross-Sectional Studies
Ethics, Institutional
Female
Finland
Geriatric Nursing - ethics - organization & administration
Humans
Individualized Medicine - methods
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology
Organizational Culture
Organizational Objectives
Patient-Centered Care - organization & administration
Professional Autonomy
Young Adult
Abstract
To investigate the associations among the ethical climate, professional practice environment and individualized nursing care in care settings for older people.
The quality of care provision is affected by organizational environments, such as ethical climate and professional practice environment. Although, the association between professional practice environment and individualized nursing care has been pointed out, we know that little is known about how ethical climate is associated with the level of individualized nursing care delivery.
A cross-sectional explorative and correlational survey design.
The study was conducted in 62 units in the vicinity of a Finnish city using a sample of nurses (N = 874, response rate 58%) who worked clinically with older people in different care settings in 2012. Survey data were collected using the Hospital Ethical Climate Survey, Revised Professional Practice Environment scale and Individualised Care Scale-B. Data were analysed statistically using descriptive statistics, correlation coefficients (Pearson) and multiple stepwise regression analyses.
Statistically significant correlations were found among the variables, ethical climate and individualized care and between individualized care and all professional practice environment sub-scales. Multiple stepwise regression showed associations among individualized care, ethical climate and internal work motivation, control over practice and leadership and autonomy.
The study provided better understanding of the complex concept of individualized care by taking into consideration the ethical climate and the practice environment and their associations. To increase individualization in care provision, efforts need to be directed towards organizational aspects requiring the support of nursing leaders.
PubMed ID
24251452 View in PubMed
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Source
CMAJ. 1999 Jan 12;160(1):23, 25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-12-1999
Author
S M Alibhai
Source
CMAJ. 1999 Jan 12;160(1):23, 25
Date
Jan-12-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Decision Making
Ethics, Institutional
Freedom
Housing for the Elderly - standards
Humans
Licensure
Quebec
Notes
Comment On: CMAJ. 1998 Jul 28;159(2):143-89700325
Comment On: CMAJ. 1998 Jul 28;159(2):151-29700327
PubMed ID
9934337 View in PubMed
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Begin with ethics. The rest will follow.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184916
Source
Healthc Pap. 2002;2(3):46-53; discussion 111-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Keith MacLellan
Author Affiliation
Society of Rural Physicians of Canada, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Healthc Pap. 2002;2(3):46-53; discussion 111-4
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academic Medical Centers - ethics - organization & administration
Canada
Community Health Services - organization & administration - supply & distribution
Community-Institutional Relations
Ethics, Institutional
Humans
Social Responsibility
Abstract
Solutions to some of the challenges facing Academic Health Sciences Centres (AHSC) might be found in expanding their mandate from the traditional tripartite definition - teaching, research and patient care - to include an equally important fourth mandate - responsibility to the community. Indeed, it could be argued that the current movement towards community-based teaching will exert such funding and organizational pressure on AHSCs that fundamental change will be forced upon them.
PubMed ID
12811130 View in PubMed
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76 records – page 1 of 8.