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5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist p-MPPI attenuates acute ethanol effects in mice and rats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9998
Source
Neurosci Lett. 2002 Mar 29;322(1):1-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-29-2002
Author
Nina K Popova
Elena A Ivanova
Author Affiliation
Institute of Cytology and Genetics, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Lavrentyeva 10, 630090 Novosibirsk, Russia. npopova@bionet.nsc.ru
Source
Neurosci Lett. 2002 Mar 29;322(1):1-4
Date
Mar-29-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Alcohol-Induced Disorders, Nervous System - drug therapy - metabolism - physiopathology
Aminopyridines - pharmacology
Animals
Brain - drug effects - metabolism - physiopathology
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Drug Interactions - physiology
Drug Tolerance - physiology
Ethanol - pharmacology
Hypothermia - chemically induced - drug therapy - physiopathology
Male
Mice
Mice, Inbred C3H
Neurons - drug effects - metabolism
Piperazines - pharmacology
Rats
Rats, Wistar
Receptors, Serotonin - drug effects - metabolism
Receptors, Serotonin, 5-HT1
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Serotonin - metabolism
Serotonin Antagonists - pharmacology
Sleep - drug effects - physiology
Startle Reaction - drug effects - physiology
Abstract
The effect of a selective 5-HT(1A) antagonist, 4-(2'-methoxy-)phenyl-1-[2'-(N-2"-pyridinyl)-p-iodobenzamino-]ethyl-piperazine (p-MPPI), on acute ethanol-induced hypothermia, sleep and suppression of acoustic startle reflex in C3H/He mice and Wistar rats was studied. Administration of p-MPPI at the doses of 0.4, 0.7 and 1.0 mg/kg reduced in a dose-dependent manner the ethanol-induced hypothermia and the sleep time and attenuated the ethanol-induced decrease of acoustic startle reflex magnitude in mice. Similar p-MPPI (0.4 mg/kg) effects on ethanol-induced sleep and hypothermia were obtained in rats. It was concluded that 5-HT(1A) receptors were involved in the mechanisms of the ethanol-induced hypothermia and sleep, and that 5-HT(1A) antagonist increased acute ethanol tolerance.
PubMed ID
11958829 View in PubMed
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Abstracts of the XIII Annual Nordic Meeting on Biological Alcohol Research (BAR) Norway, April 18--21, 1982.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12951
Source
Acta Pharmacol Toxicol (Copenh). 1982;51 Suppl 1:15 p.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1982
Source
Acta Pharmacol Toxicol (Copenh). 1982;51 Suppl 1:15 p.
Date
1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking
Alcoholic Intoxication
Alcoholism
Animals
Ethanol - pharmacology
Humans
PubMed ID
7148479 View in PubMed
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Accidental fatal drug poisoning with particular erference to dextropropoxyphene.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13139
Source
Forensic Sci. 1977 Sep-Oct;10(2):127-32
Publication Type
Article
Author
J. Simonsen
Source
Forensic Sci. 1977 Sep-Oct;10(2):127-32
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Delayed-Action Preparations
Denmark
Digestive System - metabolism
Drug Interactions
Ethanol - pharmacology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Propoxyphene - metabolism - poisoning
Abstract
A rapid increase in fatal accidental dextropropoxyphene poisonings which is proportional to the increased use of the drug is reported. In 30 accidental poisonings dextropropoxyphene was responsible for 50% of the cases, and is the most common accidental medical poisoning at the present time. This is probably due to the unappreciated narrow margin between therapeutic and fatal dose and the simultaneous intake of alcohol which increases the resorbtion speed from the gastro-intestinal tract. In Denmark a slow-release preparation is frequently used. which is especially dangerous because of repeated dosage by the patient attempting to induce the therapeutic effect more quickly.
PubMed ID
903048 View in PubMed
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Acetaldehyde production and metabolism by human indigenous and probiotic Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium strains.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196507
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 2000 Nov-Dec;35(6):561-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
T. Nosova
H. Jousimies-Somer
K. Jokelainen
R. Heine
M. Salaspuro
Author Affiliation
Research Unit of Alcohol Diseases, University Central Hospital of Helsinki and Anaerobe Reference Laboratory, National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 2000 Nov-Dec;35(6):561-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetaldehyde - metabolism
Alcohol Dehydrogenase - metabolism
Aldehyde Dehydrogenase - metabolism
Bifidobacterium - enzymology - metabolism
Chromatography, Gas
Ethanol - pharmacology
Humans
Lactobacillus - enzymology - metabolism
Abstract
Many human gastrointestinal facultative anaerobic and aerobic bacteria possess alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activity and are therefore capable of oxidizing ethanol to acetaldehyde. We examined whether human gastrointestinal lactobacilli (three strains), bifidobacteria (five strains) and probiotic Lactobacillus GG ATCC 53103 are also able to metabolize ethanol and acetaldehyde in vitro. Acetaldehyde production by bacterial suspensions was determined by gas chromatography after a 1-h incubation with 22 mM ethanol. To determine the acetaldehyde consumption, the suspensions were incubated with 50 microM or 500 microM acetaldehyde as well as with 500 microM acetaldehyde and 22 mM ethanol, i.e. under conditions resembling those in the human colon after alcohol intake. The influence of growth media and bacterial concentration on the ability of lactobacilli to metabolize acetaldehyde and to produce acetate from acetaldehyde were determined. ADH and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activities were determined spectrophotometrically. Neither measurable ADH nor ALDH activities were found in aerobically grown Lactobacillus GG ATCC 53103 and Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4356 strains. All the lactobacilli and bifidobacteria strains revealed a very limited capacity to oxidize ethanol to acetaldehyde in vitro. Lactobacillus GG ATCC 53103 had the highest acetaldehyde-metabolizing capacity, which increased significantly with increasing bacterial concentrations. This was associated with a marked production of acetate from acetaldehyde. The type of the growth media had no effect on acetaldehyde consumption. Addition of ethanol to the incubation media diminished the acetaldehyde-metabolizing capacity of all strains. However, in the presence of ethanol, Lactobacillus GG ATCC 53103 still demonstrated the highest capacity for acetaldehyde metabolism of all strains. These data suggest a beneficial impact of Lactobacillus GG ATCC 53103 on high gastrointestinal acetaldehyde levels following alcohol intake. The possible clinical implications of this finding remain to be established in in vitro studies.
PubMed ID
11093962 View in PubMed
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Alcohol and stroke: pathophysiologic mechanisms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10808
Source
Neuroepidemiology. 1998;17(6):281-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
M. Hillbom
H. Numminen
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, University Hospital of Oulu, Finland. matti.hillbom@oulu.fi
Source
Neuroepidemiology. 1998;17(6):281-7
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - physiopathology
Alcoholism - blood - complications - physiopathology
Animals
Cerebrovascular Disorders - etiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Ethanol - pharmacology
Humans
Abstract
Epidemiological evidence indicates that recent heavy alcohol consumption increases the risk for all major types of stroke, whereas light-to-moderate alcohol intake is associated with a decreased risk of ischemic stroke. Although heavy drinking elevates blood pressure, there is no firm evidence to indicate that alcohol consumption causes the formation of aneurysms, microaneurysms or other lesions in human arteries. Alcohol has been reported to precipitate vasoconstriction and rupture of small cerebral arteries in experimental animals. Alcohol-induced neck trauma has been shown to precipitate traumatic strokes, and alcohol-induced cardiac arrhythmias have been observed in patients with embolic brain infarction. The effects of alcohol on hemostasis, fibrinolysis and blood clotting are variable and could either prevent or promote the occurrence of strokes. The antiatherogenic effects of regular light-to-moderate alcohol consumption could be mediated by inhibition of low-density lipoprotein oxidation, and by elevated estrogen levels.
PubMed ID
9778594 View in PubMed
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Alcohol influence on acrylamide to glycidamide metabolism assessed with hemoglobin-adducts and questionnaire data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98517
Source
Food Chem Toxicol. 2010 Mar;48(3):820-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010
Author
Anna C Vikström
Kathryn M Wilson
Birgit Paulsson
Ioannis Athanassiadis
Henrik Grönberg
Hans-Olov Adami
Jan Adolfsson
Lorelei A Mucci
Katarina Bälter
Margareta Törnqvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden. anna.vikstrom@mk.su.se
Source
Food Chem Toxicol. 2010 Mar;48(3):820-4
Date
Mar-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acrylamides - metabolism
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - metabolism
Case-Control Studies
Central Nervous System Depressants - pharmacology
Epoxy Compounds - metabolism
Ethanol - pharmacology
Food Habits
Hemoglobins - metabolism
Humans
Male
Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Our purpose was to investigate whether alcohol (ethanol) consumption could have an influence on the metabolism of acrylamide to glycidamide in humans exposed to acrylamide through food. We studied a subsample from a population-based case-control study of prostate cancer in Sweden (CAPS). Questionnaire data for alcohol intake estimates was compared to the ratio of hemoglobin-adduct levels for acrylamide and glycidamide, used as a measure of individual differences in metabolism. Data from 161 non-smoking men were processed with regard to the influence of alcohol on the metabolism of acrylamide to glycidamide. A negative, linear trend of glycidamide-adduct to acrylamide-adduct-level ratios with increasing alcohol intake was observed and the strongest association (p-value for trend=0.02) was obtained in the group of men with the lowest adduct levels (47 pmol/g globin) when alcohol intake was stratified by acrylamide-adduct levels. The observed trend is likely due to a competitive effect between ethanol and acrylamide as both are substrates for cytochrome P450 2E1. Our results, strongly indicating that ethanol influence metabolism of acrylamide to glycidamide, partly explain earlier observations of only low to moderate associations between questionnaire data on dietary acrylamide intake and hemoglobin-adduct levels.
PubMed ID
20034532 View in PubMed
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Altered behavior and alcohol tolerance in transgenic mice lacking MAO A: a comparison with effects of MAO A inhibitor clorgyline.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10300
Source
Pharmacol Biochem Behav. 2000 Dec;67(4):719-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2000
Author
N K Popova
G B Vishnivetskaya
E A Ivanova
J A Skrinskaya
I. Seif
Author Affiliation
Institute of Cytology and Genetics, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Lavrentieva 10, 630090 Novosibirsk 90, Russia. npopova@bionet.nsc.ru
Source
Pharmacol Biochem Behav. 2000 Dec;67(4):719-27
Date
Dec-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - genetics
Animals
Anxiety - genetics
Central Nervous System Depressants - pharmacology
Clorgyline - pharmacology
Drug Tolerance - genetics
Ethanol - pharmacology
Exploratory Behavior - drug effects - physiology
Hypothermia - chemically induced - genetics
Male
Mice
Mice, Inbred C3H
Mice, Transgenic
Monoamine Oxidase - deficiency - genetics
Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors - pharmacology
Motor Activity - drug effects - genetics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sleep - drug effects - genetics
Startle Reaction - drug effects - genetics
Abstract
The influence of deficiency of monoamine oxidase A (MAO A) gene and the lack of enzyme MAO A on the behavior of transgenic mouse strain (Tg8) was studied. It was shown that MAO-A-lacking mice differed from mice of the wild-type strain C3H/HeJ (C3H) by an attenuated acoustic startle response, prepulse inhibition (PPI) was unchanged. In Tg 8 mice, the exploratory nose-poking in the holeboard test as well as exploratory line crossing in the "light-dark" test were decreased. No effect of MAO A deficiency on locomotor activity was found. No alcohol preference or difference between Tg8 and C3H in ethanol consumption in the free-choice test has been found, although an increase in alcohol tolerance has been demonstrated. Ethanol-induced (0.3 g/100 g ip) sleep latency was longer, duration of sleep was shorter and ethanol hypothermia was reduced in MAO-A-lacking mice. Comparison of effects of MAO A knockout with those of irreversible MAO A inhibitor clorgyline (5 and 10 mg/kg ip) on C3H mice showed a similar reducing effect on ethanol-induced sleep, but potentiated ethanol-induced hypothermia. Clorgyline administration provoked a tendency to decrease of exploratory activity in the nose-poking test and decreased the frequency of exploratory rearings in the light-dark test. Clorgyline (5 and 10 mg/kg) did not affect the acoustic startle response, but a dose of 5 mg/kg diminished PPI. Therefore, Tg8 mice exhibited a decreased startle response and exploratory activity and an increased tolerance to ethanol. A similar increase in tolerance to ethanol-induced sleep and a tendency to decrease exploratory behavior were displayed by clorgyline. Other effects on behavior were different, suggesting the influence of long-lasting action of MAO A knockout and the involvement of a compensatory mechanism in Tg8 mice.
PubMed ID
11166062 View in PubMed
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Anti-proliferative effects of lichen-derived inhibitors of 5-lipoxygenase on malignant cell-lines and mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10919
Source
J Pharm Pharmacol. 1998 Jan;50(1):107-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1998
Author
H M Ogmundsdóttir
G M Zoëga
S R Gissurarson
K. Ingólfsdóttir
Author Affiliation
Molecular and Cell Biology Research Laboratory, Icelandic Cancer Society, Reykjavík.
Source
J Pharm Pharmacol. 1998 Jan;50(1):107-15
Date
Jan-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
4-Butyrolactone - analogs & derivatives - pharmacology
Comparative Study
Ethanol - pharmacology
Fibroblasts - drug effects
Humans
Lactones - pharmacology
Lichens
Lipoxygenase Inhibitors - pharmacology
Lymphocyte Activation - drug effects
Lymphocytes - drug effects
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Salicylic Acids - pharmacology
Tumor Cells, Cultured
Abstract
Several lichen species have been used traditionally as medicinal plants. It has previously been shown that two low-molecular-weight lichen metabolites, lobaric acid isolated from Stereocaulon alpinum Laur. and protolichesterinic acid isolated from Cetraria islandica L. (Ach.), have in-vitro inhibitory effects on arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase. We have studied the effects of these compounds on cultured cells from man, including three malignant cell-lines (T-47D and ZR-75-1 from breast carcinomas and K-562 from erythro-leukaemia), as well as normal skin fibroblasts and peripheral blood lymphocytes. Both test substances caused a significant reduction in DNA synthesis, as measured by thymidine uptake, in all three malignant cell-lines; the dose inducing 50% of maximum inhibition (ED50) was between 1.1 and 24.6 microg mL(-1) for protolichesterinic acid and between 14.5 and 44.7 microg mL(-1) for lobaric acid. The breast-cancer cell-lines were more sensitive than K-562. The proliferative response of mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes was inhibited with a mean ED50 of 8.4 microg mL(-1) and 24.5 microg mL(-1) for protolichesterinic acid and lobaric acid, respectively. These concentrations are of the same order of magnitude as the IC50 values in the 5-lipoxygenase assay. Significant cell death (assessed by the MTS (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-( 4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium) assay and trypan blue exclusion) occurred in the three malignant cell-lines at protolichesterinic acid and lobaric acid concentrations above 20 and 30 microg mL(-1), respectively. In K-562 morphological changes consistent with apoptosis were detected. Up to 38% cell death was observed at 20 microg mL(-1) for protolichesterinic acid and 15 microg mL(-1) for lobaric acid in mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes but unstimulated lymphocytes were clearly less sensitive. In contrast, the DNA synthesis, proliferation and survival of normal skin fibroblasts were not affected at doses up to 20 microg mL(-1) for protolichesterinic acid and 30 microg mL(-1) for lobaric acid. We conclude that the anti-proliferative and cytotoxic effects observed might be related to the 5-lipoxygenase inhibitory activity of protolichesterinic acid and lobaric acid. These results open up the opportunity for future studies of these lichen metabolites with regard to their anti-tumour and anti-inflammatory properties.
PubMed ID
9504441 View in PubMed
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Apolipoprotein E phenotype determines the effect of alcohol on blood pressure in middle-aged men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10774
Source
Am J Hypertens. 1998 Nov;11(11 Pt 1):1334-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1998
Author
H. Kauma
M J Savolainen
A O Rantala
M. Lilja
K. Kervinen
A. Reunanen
Y A Kesäniemi
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine and Biocenter Oulu, University of Oulu, Finland. heikki.kauma@oulu.fi
Source
Am J Hypertens. 1998 Nov;11(11 Pt 1):1334-43
Date
Nov-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alleles
Apolipoproteins E - genetics
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Ethanol - pharmacology
Female
Humans
Insulin Resistance
Male
Middle Aged
Phenotype
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Apolipoprotein E (apoE) has an essential role in lipoprotein metabolism, but recent studies have also revealed other functions associated with it, eg, neurologic and malignant diseases. We studied the association between apoE phenotypes E2/3, E3/3, and E4/3 and blood pressure after adjustment for covariates, as well as the association between phenotypes and adjusted plasma glucose and insulin levels in the standard oral glucose tolerance test in a random middle-aged population-based cohort of 259 men and 267 women. Systolic blood pressure was associated with apoE phenotype in the men with moderate or heavy alcohol consumption (>115 g/week), the mean systolic blood pressure value being 16 mm Hg higher in the E2/3 and 11 mm Hg higher in the E3/3 phenotypes than in the E4/3 phenotype, P = .04. No association was seen in occasional drinkers or teetotalers (lowest tertile
Notes
Comment In: Am J Hypertens. 1999 Sep;12(9 Pt 1):946-710509555
Comment In: Am J Hypertens. 1999 Sep;12(9 Pt 1):949-5010509558
PubMed ID
9832177 View in PubMed
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Autoantibodies against cytochromes P-4502E1 and P-4503A in alcoholics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10735
Source
Mol Pharmacol. 1999 Feb;55(2):223-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1999
Author
S D Lytton
A. Helander
Z Q Zhang-Gouillon
K. Stokkeland
R. Bordone
S. Aricò
E. Albano
S W French
M. Ingelman-Sundberg
Author Affiliation
Division of Molecular Toxicology, Institute for Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Mol Pharmacol. 1999 Feb;55(2):223-33
Date
Feb-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcoholism - epidemiology - immunology
Amino Acid Sequence
Animals
Antibodies, Monoclonal - immunology
Antibody Specificity
Aryl Hydrocarbon Hydroxylases
Autoantibodies - analysis - immunology
Central Nervous System Depressants - pharmacology
Cytochrome P-450 CYP2E1 - immunology
Cytochrome P-450 CYP3A
Cytochrome P-450 Enzyme System - genetics - immunology
Ethanol - pharmacology
Female
Humans
Immune Sera - immunology
Italy - epidemiology
Male
Microsomes, Liver - immunology
Middle Aged
Mixed Function Oxygenases - genetics - immunology
Molecular Sequence Data
Oxidoreductases, N-Demethylating - immunology
Plasmids - genetics
Rabbits
Rats
Rats, Wistar
Recombinant Fusion Proteins - genetics - immunology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sequence Deletion
Sequence Homology, Amino Acid
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Autoantibodies against soluble liver enzymes have been reported among alcoholics, but the targets of self-reactivity toward membrane proteins of the liver have not been characterized. Previously, among alcoholics, we found antibodies against ethanol-derived radical protein adducts that are dependent on cytochrome P-4502E1 (CYP2E1) for their formation. To further investigate autoantibodies against cytochrome P-450s during alcohol abuse, sera of rats chronically treated with ethanol in the total enteral nutrition model and sera from alcoholics with or without alcohol liver disease and from control subjects were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blotting for the presence of IgG against rat and human CYP2E1, rat CYP3A1, and human CYP3A4. A time-dependent appearance of IgG against rat CYP3A1 and CYP2E1 was evident during chronic ethanol feeding of rats. Anti-CYP2E1 reactivity showed positive correlation with the levels of hepatic CYP2E1 and was inhibited by the CYP2E1 transcriptional inhibitor chlormethiazole. Screening of the human sera by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay revealed reactivity against CYP3A4 and CYP2E1 in about 20 to 30% and 10 to 20% of the alcoholic sera, respectively. No difference were noted between sera from alcoholics with or without hepatitis C virus infection, and only very little reactivity was seen in sera from control subjects. Western blotting analysis revealed anti-human CYP2E1 reactivity in 8 of 85 alcoholic sera and 3 of 58 control sera, whereas anti-CYP3A4 reactivity was detected in 18 of 85 alcoholic sera and 4 of 58 control sera, which were different from the sera reactive with CYP2E1. Immunoblot reactivity of CYP3A4-positive alcoholic sera was found against glutathione-S-transferase fusion proteins containing truncated forms of CYP3A4, and such sera were also able to immunoprecipitate in vitro translated CYP3A4. Seven of eight sera showed reactivity toward domains C-terminal of position Ser281, and 1 of 8 sera recognized autoepitopes within the region Thr207-Ser281. These findings indicate that alcoholics develop autoantibodies against CYP2E1 and CYP3A4 that the CYP3A4 C-terminal domain is a target for the autoantibody reactions among a subset of alcoholics. The novel finding of CYP3A4 autoantibodies and their significant expression among alcoholics warrants further investigation. Attention should be given to immune toxicity associated with CYP3A4 autoantibodies and cases of alcohol abuse that are accompanied by exposure to drugs and substances that are CYP3A substrates.
PubMed ID
9927612 View in PubMed
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65 records – page 1 of 7.