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Antidiabetic effects of Justicia spicigera Schltdl (Acanthaceae).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122422
Source
J Ethnopharmacol. 2012 Sep 28;143(2):455-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-28-2012
Author
Rolffy Ortiz-Andrade
Angel Cabañas-Wuan
Víctor E Arana-Argáez
Angel Josabad Alonso-Castro
Rocio Zapata-Bustos
Luis A Salazar-Olivo
Fabiola Domínguez
Marco Chávez
Candy Carranza-Álvarez
Alejandro García-Carrancá
Author Affiliation
Facultad de Química, Universidad Autónoma de Yucatán, Mérida, Yucatán, México. rolffy@uady.mx
Source
J Ethnopharmacol. 2012 Sep 28;143(2):455-62
Date
Sep-28-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
3T3 Cells
4-Chloro-7-nitrobenzofurazan - analogs & derivatives - metabolism
Acanthaceae
Adipocytes - drug effects - metabolism
Animals
Antioxidants - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Benzothiazoles - metabolism
Cell Survival - drug effects
Cells, Cultured
Deoxyglucose - analogs & derivatives - metabolism
Diabetes Mellitus, Experimental - drug therapy - metabolism
Ethanol - chemistry
Glucose - metabolism
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Hypoglycemic Agents - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Kaempferols - analysis
Male
Mice
Phytotherapy
Plant Extracts - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Plant Leaves
Rats
Rats, Wistar
Solvents - chemistry
Sulfonic Acids - metabolism
Abstract
Justicia spicigera is a plant species used for the Teenak (Huesteca Potosina) and Mayan (Yucatan peninsula) indigenous for the empirical treatment of diabetes, infections and as stimulant.
To evaluate the cytotoxicity, antioxidant and antidiabetic properties of J. spicigera.
The effects of ethanolic extracts of J. spicigera (JSE) on the glucose uptake in insulin-sensitive and insulin-resistant murine 3T3-F442A and human subcutaneous adipocytes was evaluated. The antioxidant activities of the extract of JSE was determined by ABTS and DPPH methods. Additionally, it was evaluated the antidiabetic properties of JSE on T2DM model.
JSE stimulated 2-NBDG uptake by insulin-sensitive and insulin-resistant human and murine adipocytes in a concentration-dependent manner with higher potency than rosiglitazone 1mM. JSE showed antioxidant effects in vitro and induced glucose lowering effects in normoglycemic and STZ-induced diabetic rats.
The antidiabetic effects of administration of J. spicigera are related to the stimulation of glucose uptake in both insulin-sensitive and insulin-resistant murine and human adipocytes and this evidence justify its empirical use in Traditional Medicine. In addition, J. spicigera exerts glucose lowering effects in normoglycemic and STZ-induced diabetic rats.
PubMed ID
22819688 View in PubMed
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Antioxidant and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activities of ethanol extract and pure flavonoids from Adinandra nitida leaves.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141270
Source
Pharm Biol. 2010 Dec;48(12):1432-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Benguo Liu
Jiguo Yang
Yuxiang Ma
Erdong Yuan
Chungang Chen
Author Affiliation
School of Food Science, Henan Institute of Science and Technology, Xinxiang 453003, China. zzgclbg@126.com
Source
Pharm Biol. 2010 Dec;48(12):1432-8
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - isolation & purification - pharmacology
Antioxidants - isolation & purification - pharmacology
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid
Ethanol - chemistry
Flavonoids - isolation & purification - pharmacology
Humans
Plant Extracts - pharmacology
Plant Leaves
Solvents - chemistry
Theaceae - chemistry
Abstract
Adinandra nitida Merr. ex. H.L. Li (Theaceae) is an indigenous plant in south China. Its leaves have been reported to have many curative effects such as reducing blood pressure, as well as antibacterial, antioxidant, and analgesic properties, which could be used in foods and medicines.
The antioxidant and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activities of the main flavonoids and ethanol extract (EE) of A. nitida leaves were investigated for the first time.
The main flavonoids of A. nitida leaves (camellianin A, camellianin B) were prepared and their contents in EE were determined by HPLC. The antioxidant activities of the samples were measured by DPPH radical scavenging assay and Rancimat test. The ACE inhibitory activities of the samples were carried out by using an assay kit with hippuryl-glycyl-glycine as substrate.
The contents of camellianin A, camellianin B and apigenin in EE were determined as 41.98, 2.67, and 1.73%, respectively. The antioxidant activities of the flavonoids were far lower than that of EE in DPPH radical scavenging and Rancimat assays. However, the ACE-inhibitory activities of camellianin A, camellianin B and apigenin were higher than that of EE.
The flavonoid content of EE was more than 45%. The high activities of EE in DPPH scavenging and Rancimat assay could be mainly attributed to compounds other than flavonoids. However, the ACE-inhibitory activity of EE could be mainly attributed to the presence of the flavonoids.
PubMed ID
20738217 View in PubMed
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Antitumorigenic and cytotoxic properties of an ethanol extract derived from Rhus verniciflua Stokes (RVS).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192645
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2001 Oct 26;64(4):357-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-26-2001
Author
D D Kitts
K T Lim
Author Affiliation
Food, Nutrition, and Health, Faculty of Agricultural Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. ddkitts@unixg.ubc.ca
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2001 Oct 26;64(4):357-71
Date
Oct-26-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antioxidants - pharmacology
Cell Culture Techniques
Cell Death
Cell Division - drug effects
Chemoprevention
Copper - chemistry
DNA Damage - drug effects
Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel
Ethanol - chemistry
Free Radicals
Glycoproteins - isolation & purification - pharmacology
HeLa Cells - drug effects
Humans
Hydrogen Peroxide - pharmacology
Iron - pharmacology
Mice
Neoplasms - prevention & control
Neurons - drug effects
Oxidation-Reduction
Plant Extracts - pharmacology
Plasmids
Rhus
Abstract
In this study, the antioxidant, cytotoxic, and antitumorigenic activities of a fractionated, ethanol extract derived from Rhus verniciflua Stokes (RVS), a plant indigenous to Korea, China, and Japan, were determined. Physicochemical analysis and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) results indicated that the active component of a Sephadex G-150-fractionated RVS extract (PII fraction) was a copper-containing glycoprotein, possibly a plant laccase. Antioxidant activity of the fractionated RVS extract, observed in both aqueous and lipid in vitro oxidation reactions using 1,1-diphenyl 2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical, site-specific Fenton-reaction deoxyribose, and a model lipid emulsion test system, indicated an affinity for protection against hydroxyl and peroxyl radicals. Cultured mouse brain neurons were protected against glucose oxidase-induced hydroxyl radical in the presence of the fractionated RVS extract (e.g., 58% protection at 4.9 microM and 95% protection with 22.7 microM RVS). RVS was further shown to protect against in vitro Fenton-reaction-induced single- and double-strand scission in supercoiled plasmid DNA. Further testing for bioactivity of the fractionated RVS extract was based on the affinity to inhibit cell proliferation in cultured HeLa and CT-26 tumor cells. The presence of RVS resulted in 70% cell death after 24 h of incubation in both cell lines at a minimum concentration of 2.48 microM RVS. Data demonstrate multiple bioactive chemopreventative properties of a Sephadex G-150-fractionated extract derived from RVS.
PubMed ID
11693493 View in PubMed
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Are Russian propolis ethanol extracts the future for the prevention of medical and biomedical implant contaminations?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285648
Source
Phytomedicine. 2017 Jul 01;30:50-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-01-2017
Author
Ashwin Ambi
Julia Bryan
Katherine Borbon
Daniel Centeno
Tianchi Liu
Tung Po Chen
Thomas Cattabiani
Christian Traba
Source
Phytomedicine. 2017 Jul 01;30:50-58
Date
Jul-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Anti-Bacterial Agents - chemistry - pharmacology
Bacterial Adhesion - drug effects
Biofilms - drug effects
Cell Line
Drug Resistance, Bacterial - drug effects
Escherichia coli - drug effects
Ethanol - chemistry
Metals - analysis - pharmacology
Mice
Mice, Inbred C57BL
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Osteoblasts - drug effects
Propolis - analysis - chemistry - pharmacology
Russia
Staphylococcal Infections - prevention & control
Staphylococcus aureus - drug effects
Abstract
Most studies reveal that the mechanism of action of propolis against bacteria is functional rather than structural and is attributed to a synergism between the compounds in the extracts.
Propolis is said to inhibit bacterial adherence, division, inhibition of water-insoluble glucan formation, and protein synthesis. However, it has been shown that the mechanism of action of Russian propolis ethanol extracts is structural rather than functional and may be attributed to the metals found in propolis. If the metals found in propolis are removed, cell lysis still occurs and these modified extracts may be used in the prevention of medical and biomedical implant contaminations.
The antibacterial activity of metal-free Russian propolis ethanol extracts (MFRPEE) on two biofilm forming bacteria: penicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli was evaluated using MTT and a Live/Dead staining technique. Toxicity studies were conducted on mouse osteoblast (MC-3T3) cells using the same viability assays.
In the MTT assay, biofilms were incubated with MTT at 37°C for 30min. After washing, the purple formazan formed inside the bacterial cells was dissolved by SDS and then measured using a microplate reader by setting the detecting and reference wavelengths at 570nm and 630nm, respectively. Live and dead distributions of cells were studied by confocal laser scanning microscopy.
Complete biofilm inactivation was observed when biofilms were treated for 40h with 2µg/ml of MFRPEE. Results indicate that the metals present in propolis possess antibacterial activity, but do not have an essential role in the antibacterial mechanism of action. Additionally, the same concentration of metals found in propolis samples, were toxic to tissue cells. Comparable to samples with metals, metal free samples caused damage to the cell membrane structures of both bacterial species, resulting in cell lysis.
Results suggest that the structural mechanism of action of Russian propolis ethanol extracts stem predominate from the organic compounds. Further studies revealed drastically reduced toxicity to mammalian cells when metals were removed from Russian propolis ethanol extracts, suggesting a potential for medical and biomedical applications.
PubMed ID
28545669 View in PubMed
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[Chemical composition and cryoprotective activity of ethanol extract from winter caterpillars Aporia crataegi L.]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9546
Source
Izv Akad Nauk Ser Biol. 2003 Sep-Oct;(5):547-52
Publication Type
Article
Author
N G Li
V L Osakovskii
S S Ivanova
Author Affiliation
Institute of Permafrost Biological Problems, Siberian Division, Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninskii pr. 41, Yakutsk, 677089 Russia.
Source
Izv Akad Nauk Ser Biol. 2003 Sep-Oct;(5):547-52
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Biogenic Amines - isolation & purification - pharmacology
Blood Preservation
Butterflies - chemistry
Carotenoids - isolation & purification - pharmacology
Cell Survival - drug effects - physiology
Crataegus
Cryopreservation
Cryoprotective Agents - isolation & purification - pharmacology
English Abstract
Ethanol - chemistry
Freezing
Glycerol - isolation & purification - pharmacology
Humans
Lymphocytes - drug effects - physiology
Seasons
Tissue Extracts - isolation & purification - pharmacology
Abstract
Glycerol, alpha-carotene, and other yet unidentified compounds have been found in the ethanol extract from winter caterpillars of the black-veined white (Aporia crataegi L.). We have shown that the ethanol extract has a cryoprotective effect on human peripheral blood lymphocytes, and this activity is approximately three times higher than that of glycerol (particularly, in the case of repeated freezing), which is one of the best cryoprotectors.
PubMed ID
14735784 View in PubMed
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Denitrification rate and carbon source consumption in full-scale wastewater filtration.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9327
Source
Water Sci Technol. 2004;50(7):105-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
L. Jonsson
Author Affiliation
Stockholm Water Co, SE-106 36 Stockholm, Sweden. lena.jonsson@stockholmvatten.se
Source
Water Sci Technol. 2004;50(7):105-12
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetates - chemistry
Bioreactors
Carbon - chemistry
Ethanol - chemistry
Filtration - methods
Kinetics
Methanol - chemistry
Nitrates - chemistry
Nitrogen - chemistry
Oxygen - chemistry
Phosphorus - chemistry
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sewage
Stainless Steel
Sweden
Time Factors
Waste Disposal, Fluid - economics - instrumentation - methods
Water Purification - economics - instrumentation - methods
Abstract
In response to new demands for increased removal of nitrogen and phosphorus, the Henriksdal and Bromma treatment plants, with hydraulic loads of 283,000 and 148,000 m3/d, respectively, built filtration steps as a final process step in the plants. The denitrification rates in a full-scale and in a pilot plant filter are calculated to 13.1 and 21.3 g (NO3+NO2)-N/(m3 x h), respectively, in the total filter bed after 2.5-24.2 and 16.0-28.0 h of operational time, and 6.4 and 18.7 g (NO3+NO2)-N/(m3 x h), respectively, after 1.0 and 0.1-0.9 h of operational time. In composite samples, the denitrification rate in the total filter bed is 10-20 g (NO3+NO2)-N/(m3 x h) in the full-scale filter. The average values for k = deltaCODf/deltaC(T) are 1.6 and around 3 in the total filter bed in steady state and in the beginning of the experiments, respectively, both in the full-scale and in the pilot plant study. The carbon source costs for reducing the concentration of nitrate nitrogen in the Bromma plant from 12 to 8 mg/l in the effluent are 117,400 EUR and 147,400 EUR with methanol and ethanol, respectively, as a carbon source.
PubMed ID
15553465 View in PubMed
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[Effect of incubation medium dielectric permeability on enzymatic activity of functionally different ATPases of smooth muscles]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11017
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 1997 Jul-Aug;69(4):9-17
Publication Type
Article
Author
N N Slinchenko
T T Taran
S A Kosterin
Author Affiliation
A.V.Palladin Institute of Biochemistry, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kyiv.
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 1997 Jul-Aug;69(4):9-17
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetone - chemistry - pharmacology
Animals
Ca(2+) Mg(2+)-ATPase - metabolism
Catalysis
Cell Membrane - drug effects - enzymology
Cryoprotective Agents - chemistry - pharmacology
Dimethyl Sulfoxide - chemistry - pharmacology
Dioxanes - chemistry - pharmacology
Electrostatics
English Abstract
Ethanol - chemistry - pharmacology
Female
In Vitro
Muscle, Smooth - drug effects - enzymology
Myometrium - enzymology
Myosins - metabolism
Solvents - chemistry - pharmacology
Swine
Abstract
Some organic solvents (2-10%) have been comparatively studied for their effect on purified transporting Ca2+, Mg(2+)-ATPase, solubilized from the plasma membrane of smooth muscle cells and on actomyosine ATPase of the smooth muscle. The inhibiting effect of solvents on the initial maximum specific activity of Ca2+, Mg(2+)-ATPase corresponds to the sequence dioxane > acetone > ethanol > dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Like the case with Ca2+, Mg(2+)-ATPase, dioxane inhibits actomyosine ATPase; acetone, ethanol and DMSO stimulate ATP-hydrolase reaction which is catalyzed by the complex of contractile proteins. It is proved that the effect of the decrease of ATPase activity with decrease of incubation medium polarity is exceptionally determined by the value of incubation medium the dielectric permeability. This effect is independent of chemical nature of organic solvents which were used with the aim to obtain the corresponding values of D. It is supposed that the cause of activity inhibition of solubilized transporting Ca2+, Mg(2+)-ATPase under the effect of dioxane, acetone, ethanol and inhibition of activity of actomyosine ATPase as affected by dioxane is mainly connected with the increase of electrostatical interaction between opposity charged active centre of ATPase and the product (products) of ATP-hydrolase reaction (Mg ADP-, HPO4(2-)), which is induced by the decrease of incubation medium polarity (the decrease of D value). Stimulating effect of acetone and ethanol on actomyosine ATPase is probably determined by superposition of two components: that connected with direct effect of these solvents on the protein catalyst (interaction with enzyme with the future break of hydrogen and hydrophobic bonds in the protein and its "fluffing") and "electrostatic component" determined by the change of D value of the incubation medium. Possible role of electrostatic interactions between ATPases and reagents as the factor of non-specific control of catalytic activity of these enzymes is discussed.
PubMed ID
9583116 View in PubMed
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Effect of initial voltage ramp on separation efficiency in non-aqueous capillary electrophoresis with ethanol as background electrolyte solvent.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9240
Source
J Chromatogr A. 2005 Mar 11;1068(1):107-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-11-2005
Author
Sami Palonen
Matti Jussila
Marja-Liisa Riekkola
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 55, FI-00014 University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. sami.palonen@helsinki.fi
Source
J Chromatogr A. 2005 Mar 11;1068(1):107-14
Date
Mar-11-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Electrolytes - chemistry
Electrophoresis, Capillary - methods
Ethanol - chemistry
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Solvents - chemistry
Abstract
Band broadening at high electric field strengths in capillary electrophoresis (CE), especially in wide capillaries, is often attributed to radial temperature gradients in the interior of the capillary caused by Joule heating. In some cases, however, a major cause of the lower separation efficiency could be the abrupt application of high electric field strength. We show that, with ethanol as background electrolyte solvent, initial abrupt voltage application introduces band broadening, which is especially pronounced in wider capillaries at high electric field and ionic strengths. With an appropriate initial voltage ramp this effect can be avoided. The effect of different voltage ramp up times on the separation efficiency of some anionic analytes was investigated with 50, 75 and 100 microm I.D. capillaries at field strengths of 1000-2000 V cm(-1). The results suggest that the band broadening associated with abrupt voltage application is of thermal origin and probably related to thermal volume expansion of the sample and background electrolyte solutions. The plate numbers calculated with a plate height model were in good agreement with the experimental values when a sufficiently long voltage ramp was employed. The dispersion due to axial temperature gradients was found to be very small under the experimental conditions used.
PubMed ID
15844548 View in PubMed
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Effect of reduction in yeast and enzyme concentrations in a simultaneous- saccharification-and-fermentation-based bioethanol process: technical and economic evaluation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9212
Source
Appl Biochem Biotechnol. 2005;121-124:485-99
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Anders Wingren
Mats Galbe
Christian Roslander
Andreas Rudolf
Guido Zacchi
Author Affiliation
Department of Chemical Engineering, Lund University, PO Box 124, SE-221 00 Lund, Sweden.
Source
Appl Biochem Biotechnol. 2005;121-124:485-99
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bioreactors - economics - microbiology
Cell Culture Techniques - economics - methods
Cellulase - chemistry - economics - metabolism
Comparative Study
Computer simulation
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Ethanol - chemistry - economics - metabolism
Models, Biological
Models, Econometric
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Saccharomyces cerevisiae - metabolism
Sweden
beta-Glucosidase - economics - metabolism
Abstract
The ethanol production cost in a simultaneous saccharification and fermentation-based bioethanol process is influenced by the requirements for yeast production and for enzymes. The main objective of this study was to evaluate--technically and economically--the influence of these two factors on the production cost. A base case with 5 g/L of baker's yeast and an initial concentration of water-insoluble solids of 5% resulted in an experimental yield of 85%. When these data were implemented in Aspen Plus, yeast was assumed to be produced from sugars in the hydrolysate, reducing the overall ethanol yield to 69%. The ethanol production cost was 4.80 SEK/L (2.34 US$/gal). When adapted yeast was used at 2 g/L, an experimental yield of 74% was achieved and the estimated ethanol production cost was the same as in the base case. A 50% reduction in enzyme addition resulted in an increased production cost, to 5.06 SEK/L (2.47 US$/gal) owing to reduced ethanol yield.
PubMed ID
15920258 View in PubMed
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Ethanol absorption across human skin measured by in vivo microdialysis technique.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12104
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 1991;71(5):389-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
C. Anderson
T. Andersson
M. Molander
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 1991;71(5):389-93
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chromatography, Gas - methods
Dialysis - instrumentation - methods
Equipment Design
Ethanol - chemistry - pharmacokinetics
Extracellular Space - chemistry - metabolism
Forearm
Humans
Models, Biological
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Skin - chemistry - cytology - metabolism
Skin Absorption - physiology
Specimen Handling - methods
Sweden
Abstract
Microdialysis, a new bioanalytical sampling technique enables measurement of substances in the extracellular space. This initial study investigates the technique's usefulness in the field of percutaneous absorption of solvents, using ethanol as test substance. Microdialysis probes are equipped at the tip with a semi-permeable polycarbonate membrane which permits passive diffusion of substances. Ethanol does not damage the membrane. In vitro recovery for ethanol is good. Probes were inserted via a guide into the skin of the ventral forearm in 7 volunteers. 99.5% ethanol was applied to the skin in excess in a glass reservoir. The probe was perfused at a flow of 1 microliter/min. 50 microliters samples were analysed by gas chromatography. Absorption of ethanol was demonstrated in all subjects. Values from the 9 probes inserted ranged from 10 micrograms/ml to 800 micrograms/ml. The variation may be explained by inter-test or inter-individual variability in ethanol absorption. Individual metabolic capacity may be of importance. The method opens new possibilities in the investigation of skin barrier function in man.
PubMed ID
1684466 View in PubMed
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18 records – page 1 of 2.