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Antiseptic effects at injection sites.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209856
Source
Dermatology. 1997;195 Suppl 2:107-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
T. Arata
M. Kamitani
T. Miyai
M. Ito
Author Affiliation
Surgical Center, Okayama University Hospital, Japan.
Source
Dermatology. 1997;195 Suppl 2:107-10
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Infective Agents, Local - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Antisepsis
Bacteria - drug effects - growth & development
Bacterial Infections - prevention & control
Chemoprevention
Chlorhexidine - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Colony Count, Microbial
Cross-Over Studies
Ethanol - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Humans
Injections - adverse effects
Iodophors - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Povidone-Iodine - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Skin - microbiology
Abstract
To our knowledge, there are no published papers detailing antisepsis for injection sites. In view of this, the efficacies of povidone-iodine (PVP-I) ethanol solution and chlorhexidine (CH) ethanol, the agents most commonly used for antisepsis of the operative field, were compared. Before and after the injection site was disinfected with either of these antiseptics, specimens of indigenous bacteria on the skin were collected by the cylinder scrub method, and the bacteria reduction rate and the reduction factor (RF) were determined to evaluate the efficacy of antisepsis. The bacteria reduction rate and RF value obtained for PVP-I ethanol were 95.1 +/- 11.2 and 2.1 +/- 0.9% and those for CH ethanol were 93.5 +/- 9.3 and 1.8 +/- 0.9%. Since there were individual differences in cell count before antisepsis, no significant difference was seen in bactericidal activity. However, slightly more favorable results were obtained with PVP-I ethanol. Although it is impossible to eradicate completely the indigenous microbes with currently available methods, it is considered important for the prevention of infection of the injection site to decrease bacterial counts as much as possible.
PubMed ID
9403267 View in PubMed
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[Ethanol injections in the integrated treatment of non-resectable malignant pancreatic tumor complicated by jaundice]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9870
Source
Klin Khir. 2002 Sep;(9):25-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2002
Author
V S Zemskov
Ia M Susak
I O Koval's'ka
Ie R Deneka
O V Kravchenko
Ie A Kriuchyna
Source
Klin Khir. 2002 Sep;(9):25-7
Date
Sep-2002
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Combined Modality Therapy
English Abstract
Ethanol - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Female
Humans
Injections
Jaundice - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Pancreatic Neoplasms - complications - pathology - therapy
Pancreaticoduodenectomy - methods
Abstract
Results of treatment were analyzed in 28 patients with nonresectable pancreatic cancer (III-IV stages) complicated by jaundice, to whom in complex of treatment (biliodigestive shunting, in some of patients with hepatic dearterialyzation, gastroenterostomy, pancreatodigestive shunting) 96% ethanol was injected into the tumor. The complications frequency had constituted 21.4%, mortality--14.3%, the life span of operated patients--9 months at average. Sings of early and late "postethylizational" positive pancreatic cancer pathomorphosis were established.
PubMed ID
12440206 View in PubMed
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Wine intake and diet in a random sample of 48763 Danish men and women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10739
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 1999 Jan;69(1):49-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1999
Author
A. Tjønneland
M. Grønbaek
C. Stripp
K. Overvad
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society, Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Copenhagen. annet@cancer.dk
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 1999 Jan;69(1):49-54
Date
Jan-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Beer
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Diet
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Ethanol - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Female
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - prevention & control
Odds Ratio
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Wine
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Variation in diet associated with drinking patterns may explain why wine seems to reduce ischemic heart disease mortality. OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to study the association between intake of different alcoholic beverages and selected indicators of a healthy diet. DESIGN: This was a cross-sectional study conducted in Copenhagen and Aarhus, Denmark, from 1995 to 1997, and included 23 284 men and 25 479 women aged 50-64 y. The main outcome measures were groups of selected foods that were indicators of a healthy dietary pattern. RESULTS: Wine, as compared with other alcoholic drinks, was associated with a higher intake of fruit, fish, cooked vegetables, salad, and the use of olive oil for cooking in both men and women. Men who preferred beer and spirits had odds ratios of 0.42 (95% CI: 0.39, 0.45) and 0.51 (95% CI: 0.43, 0.60), respectively, for a high intake of salad compared with those who preferred wine. Higher wine intake was associated with a higher intake of healthy food items compared with intake of
Notes
Comment In: Am J Clin Nutr. 1999 Jan;69(1):2-39925114
PubMed ID
9925122 View in PubMed
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