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60 records – page 1 of 6.

An almost completed pollution-recovery cycle reflected by sediment geochemistry and benthic foraminiferal assemblages in a Swedish-Norwegian Skagerrak fjord.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272280
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2015 Jun 15;95(1):126-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-15-2015
Author
Irina Polovodova Asteman
Daniela Hanslik
Kjell Nordberg
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2015 Jun 15;95(1):126-40
Date
Jun-15-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aquatic Organisms
Carbon - analysis
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Estuaries
Foraminifera - physiology
Geologic Sediments - analysis - chemistry
Industrial Waste
Lead Radioisotopes - analysis
Metals, Heavy - analysis
Nitrogen - analysis
Norway
Sweden
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Water Pollution, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
During the 20th century Idefjord was considered one of the most polluted marine areas in Scandinavia. For decades it received high discharges from paper/pulp industry, which made it anoxic and extremely polluted by heavy metals and organic contaminants. Today the fjord is close to fulfil a complete pollution-recovery cycle, which is recorded in its sediment archives. Here we report results from five sediment cores studied for TC, C/N, heavy metals and benthic foraminifera. All of the cores have laminations deposited during 1940-1980s and indicative of long-lasting anoxia; high TC and heavy metal content, poor foraminiferal faunas and lack of macrofauna. The upper part of the cores deposited since 1980s shows a gradual pollutant decrease and partial foraminiferal recovery. The majority of foraminiferal species in Idefjord are agglutinated opportunistic and stress-tolerant taxa, which to some extent tolerate hypoxia and are early colonisers of previously disturbed environments. The current study demonstrates a value of benthic foraminiferal stratigraphy as a useful tool in understanding processes driving environmental degradation and recovery of coastal ecosystems.
PubMed ID
25931174 View in PubMed
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An experiment with forced oxygenation of the deepwater of the anoxic By Fjord, western Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266770
Source
Ambio. 2015 Feb;44(1):42-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2015
Author
Anders Stigebrandt
Bengt Liljebladh
Loreto de Brabandere
Michael Forth
Åke Granmo
Per Hall
Jonatan Hammar
Daniel Hansson
Mikhail Kononets
Marina Magnusson
Fredrik Norén
Lars Rahm
Alexander H Treusch
Lena Viktorsson
Source
Ambio. 2015 Feb;44(1):42-54
Date
Feb-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Conservation of Natural Resources - economics - methods
Environmental monitoring
Estuaries
Geologic Sediments - analysis
Nitrates - analysis
Oxidation-Reduction
Oxygen - analysis
Seasons
Seawater - microbiology
Sweden
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
In a 2.5-year-long environmental engineering experiment in the By Fjord, surface water was pumped into the deepwater where the frequency of deepwater renewals increased by a factor of 10. During the experiment, the deepwater became long-term oxic, and nitrate became the dominating dissolved inorganic nitrogen component. The amount of phosphate in the water column decreased by a factor of 5 due to the increase in flushing and reduction in the leakage of phosphate from the sediments when the sediment surface became oxidized. Oxygenation of the sediments did not increase the leakage of toxic metals and organic pollutants. The bacterial community was the first to show changes after the oxygenation, with aerobic bacteria also thriving in the deepwater. The earlier azoic deepwater bottom sediments were colonized by animals. No structural difference between the phytoplankton communities in the By Fjord and the adjacent Havsten Fjord, with oxygenated deepwater, could be detected during the experiment.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24789509 View in PubMed
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An integrative biological effects assessment of a mine discharge into a Norwegian fjord using field transplanted mussels.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298407
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2018 Dec 10; 644:1056-1069
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-10-2018
Author
S J Brooks
C Escudero-Oñate
T Gomes
L Ferrando-Climent
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute for Water Research (NIVA), Gaustadalléen 21, NO-0349 Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: sbr@niva.no.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2018 Dec 10; 644:1056-1069
Date
Dec-10-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Estuaries
Mining
Mytilus - physiology
Norway
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis - metabolism - toxicity
Abstract
The blue mussel (Mytilus sp.) has been used to assess the potential biological effects of the discharge effluent from the Omya Hustadmarmor mine, which releases its tailings into the Frænfjord near Molde, Norway. Chemical body burden and a suite of biological effects markers were measured in mussels positioned for 8?weeks at known distances from the discharge outlet. The biomarkers used included: condition index (CI); stress on stress (SoS); micronuclei formation (MN); acetylcholine esterase (AChE) inhibition, lipid peroxidation (LPO) and Neutral lipid (NL) accumulation. Methyl triethanol ammonium (MTA), a chemical marker for the esterquat based flotation chemical (FLOT2015), known to be used at the mine, was detected in mussels positioned 1500?m and 2000?m downstream from the discharge outlet. Overall the biological responses indicated an increased level of stress in mussels located closest to the discharge outlet. The same biomarkers (MN, SoS, NL) were responsible for the integrated biological response (IBR/n) of the two closest stations and indicates a response to a common point source. The integrated biological response index (IBR/n) reflected the expected level of exposure to the mine effluent, with the highest IBR/n calculated in mussels positioned closest to the discharge. Principal component analysis (PCA) also showed a clear separation between the mussel groups, with the most stressed mussels located closest to the mine tailing outlet. Although not one chemical factor could explain the increased stress on the mussels, highest metal (As, Co, Ni, Cd, Zn, Ag, Cu, Fe) and MTA concentrations were detected in the mussel group located closest to the mine discharge.
PubMed ID
30743819 View in PubMed
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Anthropogenic impact on marine ecosystem health: A comparative multi-proxy investigation of recent sediments in coastal waters.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295677
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2018 Aug; 133:328-335
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Date
Aug-2018
Author
Anna Filipkowska
Ludwik Lubecki
Malgorzata Szymczak-Zyla
Tomasz M Ciesielski
Bjørn M Jenssen
Murat V Ardelan
Hanna Mazur-Marzec
Gijs D Breedveld
Amy M P Oen
Anna Zamojska
Grazyna Kowalewska
Author Affiliation
Marine Pollution Laboratory, Institute of Oceanology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Sopot, Poland. Electronic address: afilipkowska@iopan.gda.pl.
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2018 Aug; 133:328-335
Date
Aug-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Ecosystem
Ecotoxicology - methods
Endocrine Disruptors - analysis - toxicity
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Estuaries
Geologic Sediments - analysis
Metals - analysis
Mutagens - analysis - toxicity
Norway
Organotin Compounds - analysis
Phenols - analysis
Poland
Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons - analysis
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis - toxicity
Abstract
Hazardous substances entering the sea, and ultimately deposited in bottom sediments, pose a growing threat to marine ecosystems. The present study characterized two coastal areas exposed to significant anthropogenic impact - Gulf of Gdansk (Poland), and Oslofjord/Drammensfjord (Norway) - by conducting a multi-proxy investigation of recent sediments, and comparing the results in light of different available thresholds for selected contaminants. Sediment samples were analyzed for benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P) and other polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), nonylphenols (NPs), organotin compounds (OTs), toxic metals (Cd, Hg, Pb), as well as mutagenic, genotoxic and endocrine-disrupting activities (in CALUX bioassays). In general, a declining trend in the deposition of contaminants was observed. Sediments from both basins were not highly contaminated with PAHs, NPs and metals, while OT levels may still give rise to concern in the Norwegian fjords. The results suggest that the contamination of sediments depends also on water/sediment conditions in a given region.
PubMed ID
30041322 View in PubMed
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Bacterioplankton Responses to Increased Organic Carbon and Nutrient Loading in a Boreal Estuary-Separate and Interactive Effects on Growth and Respiration.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298299
Source
Microb Ecol. 2018 Jul; 76(1):144-155
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-2018
Author
Ana R A Soares
Emma S Kritzberg
Ioana Custelcean
Martin Berggren
Author Affiliation
Department of Physical Geography and Ecosystem Science, Lund University, SE-223 62, Lund, Sweden. anaralvessoares@gmail.com.
Source
Microb Ecol. 2018 Jul; 76(1):144-155
Date
Jul-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Bacteria - growth & development - metabolism
Carbon - chemistry - metabolism
Ecosystem
Environmental monitoring
Estuaries
Fresh Water - chemistry
Heterotrophic Processes
Nutrients - chemistry - metabolism
Phosphorus - metabolism
Plankton - growth & development - metabolism
Rivers - chemistry
Salinity
Seasons
Seawater - microbiology
Sweden
Abstract
Increases in the terrestrial export of dissolved organic carbon (C) to rivers may be associated with additional loading of organic nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) to the coastal zone. However, little is known about how these resources interact in the regulation of heterotrophic bacterioplankton metabolism in boreal coastal ecosystems. Here, we measured changes in bacterioplankton production (BP) and respiration (BR) in response to full-factorial (C, N, and P) enrichment experiments at two sites within the Öre estuary, northern Sweden. The BR was stimulated by single C additions and further enhanced by combined additions of C and other nutrients. Single addition of N or P had no effect on BR rates. In contrast, BP was primarily limited by P at the site close to the river mouth and did not respond to C or N additions. However, at the site further away from the near the river mouth, BP was slightly stimulated by single additions of C. Possibly, the natural inflow of riverine bioavailable dissolved organic carbon induced local P limitation of BP near the river mouth, which was then exhausted and resulted in C-limited BP further away from the river mouth. We observed positive interactions between all elements on all responses except for BP at the site close to the river mouth, where P showed an independent effect. In light of predicted increases in terrestrial P and C deliveries, we expect future increases in BP and increases of BR of terrestrially delivered C substrates at the Öre estuary and similar areas.
PubMed ID
29255936 View in PubMed
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Behavioral responses of beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) to environmental variation in an Arctic estuary.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291971
Source
Behav Processes. 2017 Dec; 145:48-59
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2017
Author
Paul A Anderson
Russell B Poe
Laura A Thompson
Nansen Weber
Tracy A Romano
Author Affiliation
Mystic Aquarium, A division of Sea Research Foundation, Inc., 55 Coogan Blvd., Mystic, CT 06355, USA; Department of Marine Sciences, University of Connecticut at Avery Point, 1084 Shennecossett Rd., Groton, CT 06340, USA. Electronic address: panderson@mysticaquarium.org.
Source
Behav Processes. 2017 Dec; 145:48-59
Date
Dec-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Beluga Whale - psychology
Ecosystem
Energy Metabolism
Estuaries
Female
Male
Population Density
Predatory Behavior
Seasons
Social Environment
Spatial Behavior
Abstract
Some Arctic estuaries serve as substrate rubbing sites for beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) in the summer, representing a specialized resource for the species. Understanding how environmental variation affects the species' behavior is essential to management of these habitats in coming years as the climate changes. Spatiotemporal and environmental variables were recorded for behavioral observations, during which focal groups of whales in an estuary were video-recorded for enumeration and behavioral analysis. Multiple polynomial linear regression models were optimized to identify the effects of spatiotemporal and environmental conditions on group size, composition, and the frequency of behaviors being performed. Results suggest that belugas take advantage of environmental variation to express behaviors that 1) protect young, e.g., bringing calves close to shore during cloudier days, obscuring visualization from terrestrial predators; 2) avoid predation, e.g., rubbing against substrates at higher Beaufort sea states to obscure visualization, and resting during low tides while swimming on outgoing tides to avoid stranding; and 3) optimize bioenergetic resources, e.g., swimming during lower Beaufort sea states and clearer days. Predictive models like the ones presented in this study can inform conservation management strategies as environmental conditions change in future years.
PubMed ID
28927964 View in PubMed
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Benthic foraminifera as bio-indicators of chemical and physical stressors in Hammerfest harbor (Northern Norway).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282623
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2017 Jan 15;114(1):384-396
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-15-2017
Author
Noortje Dijkstra
Juho Junttila
Kari Skirbekk
JoLynn Carroll
Katrine Husum
Morten Hald
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2017 Jan 15;114(1):384-396
Date
Jan-15-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biodiversity
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Estuaries
Foraminifera - classification - drug effects
Geologic Sediments - chemistry
Metals, Heavy - analysis
Norway
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
We investigated benthic foraminiferal assemblages in contaminated sediments in a subarctic harbor of Northern Norway to assess their utility as indicators of anthropogenic impacts. Sediments in the harbor are repositories for POPs and heavy metals supplied through discharges from industry and shipping activities. Sediment contaminant concentrations are at moderate to poor ecological quality status (EcoQS) levels. The EcoQS based on benthic foraminiferal diversity reflects a similar trend to the EcoQS based on contaminant concentrations. Foraminiferal density and diversity is low throughout the harbor with distinct assemblages reflecting influence of physical disturbances or chemical stressors. Assemblages impacted by physical disturbance are dominated by L. lobatula and E. excavatum, while assemblages impacted by chemical stressors are dominated by opportunistic species S. fusiformis, S. biformis, B. spathulata and E. excavatum. The foraminiferal assemblage from an un-impacted nearby fjord consists mainly of agglutinated taxa. These assemblages provides a valuable baseline of the ecological impacts of industrialization in northern coastal communities.
PubMed ID
27697319 View in PubMed
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Benthic foraminifera contribution to fjord modern carbon pools: A seasonal study in Adventfjorden, Spitsbergen.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291752
Source
Geobiology. 2017 Sep; 15(5):704-714
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-2017
Author
J Pawlowska
M Lacka
M Kucharska
N Szymanska
K Koziorowska
K Kulinski
M Zajaczkowski
Author Affiliation
Institute of Oceanology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Sopot, Poland.
Source
Geobiology. 2017 Sep; 15(5):704-714
Date
Sep-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Carbon - metabolism
Estuaries
Foraminifera - metabolism
Geologic Sediments - chemistry - parasitology
Seasons
Svalbard
Abstract
The aim of this study was to determine the amount of organic and inorganic carbon in foraminifera specimens and to provide quantitative data on the contribution of foraminifera to the sedimentary carbon pool in Adventfjorden. The investigation was based on three calcareous species that occur commonly in Svalbard fjords: Cassidulina reniforme, Elphidium excavatum and Nonionellina labradorica. Our results show that the species investigated did not contribute substantially to the organic carbon pool in Adventfjorden, because they represented only 0.37% of the organic carbon in the sediment. However, foraminiferal biomass could have been underestimated as it did not include arenaceous or monothalamous taxa. Foraminiferal carbonate constituted up to 38% of the inorganic carbon in the sediment, which supports the assumption that in fjords where non-calcifying organisms dominate the benthic fauna foraminifera are among the major producers of calcium carbonate and that they play crucial roles in the carbon burial process. The results presented in this study contribute to estimations of changes in foraminiferal carbon levels in contemporary environments and could be an important reference for palaeoceanographic studies.
PubMed ID
28603946 View in PubMed
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Climatic impact on community of filamentous macroalgae in the Neva estuary (eastern Baltic Sea).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266710
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2015 Feb 15;91(1):166-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-15-2015
Author
Yulia I Gubelit
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2015 Feb 15;91(1):166-72
Date
Feb-15-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biomass
Climate
Ecosystem
Estuaries
Oceans and Seas
Principal Component Analysis
Russia
Seaweed - growth & development
Temperature
Weather
Wind
Abstract
In presented study the impact of climatic factors and North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) on macroalgal community was analysed. Also the factors influencing algal community were defined with help of Principal Component and Classification analysis. It was found that climatic impact may depend on habitat features and that on different sites biomass of macroalgae correlated with different weather factors. Wind and surf may affect biomass of macroalgae adversely on some sites and at the same time on other sites they may accumulate biomass, transferring it is from adjacent areas. High direct correlation with temperature was found on sites which were protected from surf and had no stagnant events. Seasonal biomass inversely significantly correlated with average seasonal wind speed and annual NAO-index.
PubMed ID
25540916 View in PubMed
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Communities of bacteria and viruses in waters of the Gulf of Ob and Taz Estuary.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280151
Source
Dokl Biol Sci. 2016 Nov;471(1):284-287
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2016
Author
M A Pavlova
P R Makarevich
T I Shirokolobova
Source
Dokl Biol Sci. 2016 Nov;471(1):284-287
Date
Nov-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bacteria - classification - isolation & purification
Estuaries - classification
Microbial Consortia - physiology
Russia
Seawater - microbiology - virology
Viruses - classification - isolation & purification
Water Microbiology
Abstract
The study of the most abundant components in freshwater plankton in the Gulf of Ob and Taz Estuary in the summer-autumn season has demonstrated that the abundance and biomass of bacteria are stable and typical for mesotrophic waters during active microalgae vegetation. The abundance of viral particles varies in the range which is reported for unproductive or medium-productive water bodies. The environmental factors affecting affect the development and patterns of bacterio- and virioplankton distribution are considered.
PubMed ID
28058603 View in PubMed
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60 records – page 1 of 6.