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Alternatives to hormone replacement therapy: a multi-method study of women's experiences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167901
Source
Complement Ther Med. 2006 Sep;14(3):185-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
C Nadine Wathen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences, McMaster University, Patterson Building, Chedoke Hospital, West Hamilton, Ont., Canada L8N 3Z5. wathenn@mcmaster.ca
Source
Complement Ther Med. 2006 Sep;14(3):185-92
Date
Sep-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Complementary Therapies - utilization
Estrogen Replacement Therapy - utilization
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Postmenopause
Abstract
To explore women's decision-making regarding use of complementary and alternative medicines (CAM) during menopause.
Qualitative interviews were conducted with 20 women who were currently or had previously used hormone replacement therapy (HRT), including questions about their experiences with alternatives to HRT. This was followed by a non-random questionnaire survey of 285 demographically representative Canadian women aged 45-65 who were current or former HRT users.
Fifty-seven percent (57%, n = 162) of women reported either having used or considered a CAM approach for menopause. Women who had tried or considered CAM were significantly younger (mean age = 54.9 years versus 56.8 years; t(280) = 3.4, p
PubMed ID
16911898 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular risk factors in a cohort of Danish women born in 1936 prior to use of hormone therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9198
Source
Maturitas. 2005 Jul 16;51(3):221-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-16-2005
Author
Ellen Løkkegaard
Lene Falgaard Eplov
Anne Køster
Karin Garde
Author Affiliation
Juliane Marie Center, Rigshospitalet, Kettegaard Alle 30, Hvidovre 2650, Denmark. ellen.loekkegaard@hh.hosp.dk
Source
Maturitas. 2005 Jul 16;51(3):221-6
Date
Jul-16-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood Glucose - analysis
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Chi-Square Distribution
Cholesterol - blood
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Estrogen Replacement Therapy - utilization
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology
Logistic Models
Longitudinal Studies
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Many observational studies suggest hormone therapy protects against coronary heart disease in contrast to findings from large randomised clinical trials and an observational Danish study. A potential bias in the observational literature concerning the cardiovascular risk and benefits associated with use of hormone therapy is the so-called 'healthy user' phenomenon, i.e. self-selection to HT use is associated with healthier cardiovascular risk profile. This study investigates whether a random sample of Danish women using HT was characterised by a favourable cardiovascular risk profile prior to menopause. METHODS: A sample of 621 women born in 1936 living in Copenhagen County was included in a prospective population-based study initiated in 1976 with follow-ups in 1981, 1987 and 1996. Investigations comprised questionnaires and physical examinations. RESULTS: At 51 and 60 years, respectively, one-third and one-half had ever used HT. At 40 years women who subsequently use HT had lower body mass index, lower self-rated health and lower fasting glucose, but no differences according to blood pressure, cholesterol, triglyceride, physical activity, smoking habits or alcohol consumption. CONCLUSION: In a cohort of Danish women from the general population ever users of HT could not be characterised as unambiguous 'healthy users'.
PubMed ID
15950410 View in PubMed
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Changes in women's attitudes towards and use of hormone therapy after HERS and WHI.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70637
Source
Maturitas. 2005 Sep 16;52(1):11-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-16-2005
Author
Mikael Hoffmann
Mats Hammar
Karin I Kjellgren
Lotta Lindh-Astrand
Jan Brynhildsen
Author Affiliation
Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Department of Medicine and Care, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping, Sweden. mikael.hoffmann@lio.se
Source
Maturitas. 2005 Sep 16;52(1):11-7
Date
Sep-16-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Communications Media
Estrogen Replacement Therapy - utilization
Female
Humans
Menopause
Middle Aged
Patient satisfaction
Questionnaires
Randomized Controlled Trials
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Women's health
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To assess changes in women's attitudes towards risk and benefits of, and use of hormone treatment in the menopausal transition (HT) before and after Heart and Estrogen/Progestin Replacement Study (HERS) and the oestrogen and progestin trial of Women's Health Initiative (WHI). METHODS: Postal questionnaires to all women 53 and 54 years of age in a Swedish community in 1999 (n=1.760) and 2003 (n=1.733). Data on sales of HT were collected from the database of the National Corporation of Swedish Pharmacies. RESULTS: The fraction of women reporting current use of HT fell from 40.5 to 25.3% (p
PubMed ID
16023804 View in PubMed
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Direct mailing of consensus recommendations did not alter GPs' knowledge and prescription of oestrogen in the menopause.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67648
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1996 Dec;14(4):203-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1996
Author
S. Hunskaar
Y S Hannestad
B. Backe
I. Matheson
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Norway.
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1996 Dec;14(4):203-8
Date
Dec-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Consensus Development Conferences
Drug Utilization - statistics & numerical data
Education, Medical, Continuing
Estrogen Replacement Therapy - utilization
Family Practice - education - standards - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Menopause - drug effects
Middle Aged
Norway
Physician's Practice Patterns
Practice Guidelines
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the impact of an information-package (direct mailing) concerning oestrogen therapy, deriving from a consensus conference in 1990, on general practitioners' (GPs') attitudes and knowledge. DESIGN AND SUBJECTS: Controlled randomised study. Two groups of Norwegian GPs. The Intervention group received an information-package consisting of the recommendations from the consensus conference, some headline questions with answers, and a classification of the oestrogens available in Norway, including a table and a graphical presentation of the costs of the different treatments. GPs stated their views on prescribing oestrogen on a five step scale, related to nine short case histories, each containing cues on complaints, smoking, family history suggesting risk for cardiovascular disease, and osteoporosis. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: GPs' views on prescribing oestrogen, relation to age, sex, practice type (solo/group) and practice location. RESULTS: The differences in answer distributions between the Intervention (n = 193) and Control (n = 181) groups did not reach statistical significance for any of the nine case histories. The answers indicate a more liberal attitude towards replacement therapy in 1992 compared to a study performed in 1990. The views on contraindications was fundamentally unaltered. CONCLUSION: The study did not reveal any significant effect of direct mailing as means of disseminating consensus conference recommendations to GPs.
PubMed ID
8956447 View in PubMed
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Do patients receive recommended treatment of osteoporosis following hip fracture in primary care?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169346
Source
BMC Fam Pract. 2006;7:31
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Robert J Petrella
Tim J Jones
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, Schulich School of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, 1490 Richmond St London, Ontario, N6G 2M3, Canada. petrella@uwo.ca
Source
BMC Fam Pract. 2006;7:31
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aftercare
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bone Density Conservation Agents - classification - therapeutic use
Calcitonin - therapeutic use
Calcium - therapeutic use
Dietary Supplements
Diphosphonates - therapeutic use
Drug Utilization - statistics & numerical data
Estrogen Replacement Therapy - utilization
Family Practice - standards
Female
Guideline Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Hip Fractures - etiology - prevention & control - rehabilitation
Humans
Male
Ontario
Osteoporosis - complications - drug therapy
Primary Health Care - standards
Rehabilitation Centers
Treatment Outcome
Vitamin D - therapeutic use
Abstract
Osteoporosis results in fractures and treatment of osteoporosis has been shown to reduce risk of fracture particularly in those who have had a history of fracture.
A prospective study was conducted using patients admitted to a hip fracture rehabilitation program at a large referral center to evaluate the use of treatments recommended for secondary prevention of osteoporotic fracture between September 1, 2001 and September 30, 2003. The frequency of medication use for the treatment of osteoporosis including estrogen replacement therapy, bisphosponates, calcitonin, calcium and vitamin D therapy was determined on admission, at 6 weeks post discharge and one year following discharge. All patients were discharged to the care of their family physician. All family physicians in the referral region received a copy of the Canadian Consensus recommendations for osteoporosis management 1-3 months prior to the study.
During the study period, 174 patients were enrolled and 121 completed all assessments. Fifty-seven family physicians were identified as caring for 1 or more of the study patients. Only 7 patients had previous BMD, only 5 patients had previously been prescribed a bisphosponate and 14 patients were taking calcium and/or vitamin D. All patients were prescribed 2500 mg calcium, 400 IU vitamin D and 5 mg residronate daily during rehabilitation and at discharge.Following discharge, a significant improvement was seen in all clinical indices of functional mobility, including the functional independence measure (FIM), walking distance, fear of falling score (FFS), and the Berg balance score (BBS). At six weeks a significant (p
Notes
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PubMed ID
16684358 View in PubMed
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Effect of neighborhood social participation on individual use of hormone replacement therapy and antihypertensive medication: a multilevel analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18467
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2003 May 1;157(9):774-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1-2003
Author
Juan Merlo
John W Lynch
Min Yang
Martin Lindström
Per Olof Ostergren
Niels Kristian Rasmusen
Lennart Råstam
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Malmö University Hospital, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden. juan.melo@smi.mas.lu.se
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2003 May 1;157(9):774-83
Date
May-1-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - supply & distribution
Cohort Studies
Emigration and Immigration
Estrogen Replacement Therapy - utilization
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Pharmacoepidemiology
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Social Environment
Sweden - epidemiology
Women's health
Abstract
The authors investigated a possible contextual effect of neighborhood on individual use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and antihypertensive medication (AHM) and the impact of neighborhood social participation on individual use of these medications. They attempted to disentangle contextual from individual influences. Multilevel logistic regression modeling was used to analyze data on 15,456 women aged 45-73 years (first level) residing in 95 neighborhoods (second level) of the city of Malmö, Sweden (250,000 inhabitants) who participated in the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study (1991-1996). AHM use was studied among 7,558 participants with defined hypertension. Of the total variability in medication use in this population, only 1.7% (HRT) and 0.5% (AHM) was between neighborhoods. After adjustment for age, individual socioeconomic factors, individual low levels of social participation, and health and behavioral variables, no neighborhood effect on AHM use was found. However, women living in neighborhoods with low social participation were much less likely to use HRT (odds ratio = 0.36, 95% confidence interval: 0.21, 0.63), especially if they themselves experienced low social participation (synergy index, 1.53) or were immigrants (synergy index, 1.68). The Malmö neighborhoods were homogeneous with regard to HRT and especially AHM use. However, differences in neighborhood social participation affected HRT use independently of individual characteristics.
PubMed ID
12727671 View in PubMed
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From systemic hormone therapy to vaginal estrogen - a nationwide register study in Finland, 2003-2012.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261357
Source
Maturitas. 2014 Aug;78(4):293-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Elisa Holm
Katri Aaltonen
Anna-Mari Heikkinen
Miia Tiihonen
Source
Maturitas. 2014 Aug;78(4):293-7
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Intravaginal
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Estrogen Receptor Modulators - administration & dosage
Estrogen Replacement Therapy - utilization
Estrogens - administration & dosage
Female
Finland
Humans
Middle Aged
Norpregnenes - administration & dosage
Prescriptions
Registries
Vagina
Abstract
To assess the patterns of use of reimbursed systemic hormone therapy (HT) and vaginal estrogen preparations among women aged 45 and older in Finland.
Reimbursed purchases of prescribed systemic HT and vaginal estrogen preparations for the years 2003-2012 were obtained from a nationwide prescription registry. Systemic preparations included estrogen patches, gels and tablets, tibolone, continuous combination preparations and sequential combination preparations. Prescribed vaginal estrogens included a vaginal ring and vaginal tablets.
Annual period prevalence for systemic HT and vaginal estrogen use.
The total prevalence of prescribed HT use remained relatively constant (at 26-27%) throughout the studied period, but the share of women using systemic preparations decreased from 21% to 12%, while the share of women using vaginal estrogens increased from 9% to 19%. Decreases were observed for all classes of systemic preparations, although the decrease was largest for sequential combination preparations (from 4.9% to 1.6%) and estrogen tablets (from 5.2% to 2.9%). Continuous combination preparations remained the most commonly used types of systemic preparation (5.4-4.2%). Systemic HT use decreased most among 45-49 year old women (9.5-4.3%), while the use of vaginal estrogens increased most among those aged 65 and over.
Based on the register data, the trends in HT use indicate changed prescribing patterns in accordance with clinical guidelines. It is notable that since 2009, vaginal estrogen was more commonly prescribed than systemic HT.
PubMed ID
24934885 View in PubMed
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Hormone replacement therapy and previous use of oral contraceptives among Swedish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22416
Source
Maturitas. 1996 Nov;25(3):193-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1996
Author
M. Hammar
J. Brynhildsen
L. Dabrosin
J. Frisk
R. Lindgren
E. Nedstrand
Y. Wyon
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Maturitas. 1996 Nov;25(3):193-9
Date
Nov-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Climacteric - drug effects
Contraceptives, Oral - administration & dosage
Drug Utilization
Estrogen Replacement Therapy - utilization
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Patient Dropouts - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To assess the current and previous use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and alternative remedies in a postmenopausal population and to relate HRT use to previous use of oral contraceptives. MATERIAL AND METHODS: All 1323 women living in Linköping of 55 or 56 years old during 1995 were sent a questionnaire asking for data with relation to health and climacteric symptoms as well as to previous and current use of HRT, oral contraceptives and alternative remedies. RESULTS: Current use of HRT was more common among women who previously used oral contraceptives (41.3%) than among women who had never used oral contraceptives (23.1%). HRT users were also more often physically active, had undergone hysterectomy and had lighter occupation than non-users. Of all women 35% were current users of HRT, half of them for at least 2 years, whereas only 5% had tried HRT and abandoned therapy. Alternative remedies were used by 5% of the women as therapy for climacteric complaints, and about four times as many women had tried such therapy but abandoned it. The only characteristic about use of alternative medicines was that they were used less often by women who had been hysterectomized. No women treated for breast cancer used HRT and only few of them used alternative remedies. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of HRT use, as well as compliance, was high. Previous use of oral contraceptives probably affected the attitude towards using HRT.
PubMed ID
8981336 View in PubMed
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Hot flushes, hormone therapy and alternative treatments: 30 years of experience from Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273085
Source
Climacteric. 2015 Feb;18(1):53-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2015
Author
L. Lindh-Åstrand
M. Hoffmann
M. Hammar
A-C Spetz Holm
Source
Climacteric. 2015 Feb;18(1):53-62
Date
Feb-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Complementary Therapies - utilization
Cross-Sectional Studies
Estrogen Replacement Therapy - utilization
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Hot Flashes - epidemiology - therapy
Humans
Middle Aged
Postmenopause - physiology
Prevalence
Registries
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The use of hormone therapy (HT) for hot flushes has changed dramatically over the past five decades. In this cross-sectional questionnaire study, the aim was to describe the use of HT and alternative treatments and to study the frequency of hot flushes. A further aim was to compare data from the present questionnaire with data from previous studies made in the same geographic area.
A questionnaire was sent to a random sample of 2000 women aged 47-56 years living in Östergötland County, Sweden. The results were compared with findings from previous studies regarding use of HT, alternative treatment and hot flushes, and the number of HT prescriptions dispensed during the corresponding time using data derived from the Swedish Prescribed Drug Registry.
The response rate was 66%. Six percent used HT, in line with prevalence data from the Swedish Prescribed Drug Registry. Alternative treatments were used by 10%. About 70% of postmenopausal women reported flushes and almost one-third of those with flushes stated that they would be positive to HT if therapy could be shown to be harmless, a view more often stated by women with severe complaints of hot flushes (67%).
The use of HT and alternative treatments is low and many women suffer from flushes that could be treated. Women considered their knowledge of the climacteric period and treatment options as insufficient. Individualized information should be given and women with significant climacteric complaints, without contraindications, should be given the opportunity to try HT.
PubMed ID
24742038 View in PubMed
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The impact of risk on preference values: implications for evaluations of postmenopausal osteoporosis therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192556
Source
Value Health. 2001 Sep-Oct;4(5):385-91
Publication Type
Article
Author
D. Coyle
G. Wells
I. Graham
K M Lee
J E Peterson
E. Papadimitropoulos
Author Affiliation
Departments of Medicine and Epidemiology and Community Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. dcoyle@lri.ca
Source
Value Health. 2001 Sep-Oct;4(5):385-91
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Attitude to Health
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - psychology
Consumer Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Coronary Disease - epidemiology - psychology
Decision Making
Estrogen Replacement Therapy - utilization
Female
Hip Fractures - epidemiology - psychology
Humans
Middle Aged
Ontario
Osteoporosis, Postmenopausal - prevention & control
Perception
Probability
Raloxifene - therapeutic use
Regression Analysis
Risk assessment
Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators - therapeutic use
Value of Life - economics
Women's health
Abstract
The objective was to assess the impact of different levels of risk of disease on a woman's preferences for health states. Women were provided with health scenarios incorporating different levels of lifetime risks for breast cancer, hip fracture, and coronary heart disease (CHD). In this way, we were able to determine the incremental effect of changes in risks of each disease on preference values.
Preference values and utility scores were obtained for six health scenarios by both the feeling thermometer (FT) and standard gamble (SG) methods. Scenarios presented the different lifetime risks of CHD, breast cancer, and hip fracture associated with and not associated with long-term use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and raloxifene. Risks of breast cancer were based on perceived risks and population risks. The sample population consisted of 40 healthy female volunteers aged between 45 and 65 years randomly selected from the Ottawa-Carleton district.
Based on their perceived risk of breast cancer, the women had higher value scores for the raloxifene risk profile than for both HRT (p = .002) and no therapy (p = .003), with similar results for analyses based on population risks and from utility scores. Regression analysis showed that the risk of breast cancer (p
PubMed ID
11705129 View in PubMed
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22 records – page 1 of 3.