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431 records – page 1 of 44.

[A consensus statement on estrogen replacement after menopause].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210352
Source
Lakartidningen. 1996 Dec 11;93(50):4657-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-11-1996
Source
Lakartidningen. 1996 Dec 11;93(50):4657-61
Date
Dec-11-1996
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Consensus Development Conferences as Topic
Estrogen Replacement Therapy
Female
Humans
Male
Menopause
Middle Aged
Sweden
PubMed ID
8999264 View in PubMed
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Acute effect of estrogen on metabolic coronary vasodilator responses to atrial pacing in postmenopausal women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205030
Source
Am J Cardiol. 1998 Jul 15;82(2):236-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-15-1998
Author
T J Anderson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Am J Cardiol. 1998 Jul 15;82(2):236-9
Date
Jul-15-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alberta
Coronary Disease - complications - physiopathology
Estrogen Replacement Therapy
Estrogens, Conjugated (USP) - therapeutic use
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Postmenopause
Vasodilation - drug effects
Women's health
Abstract
This study assessed the acute effect of intravenous conjugated equine estrogen on metabolic coronary vasodilation to atrial pacing in 22 postmenopausal women with coronary disease or risk factors for atherosclerosis. Impaired metabolic coronary vasodilation is present in postmenopausal women with atherosclerosis or its risk factors and is not acutely augmented by the intravenous administration of Premarin.
PubMed ID
9678297 View in PubMed
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Agreement of self-reported use of menopausal hormone replacement therapy with physician reports.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202232
Source
Epidemiology. 1999 May;10(3):260-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1999
Author
M G Jain
T E Rohan
G R Howe
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Epidemiology. 1999 May;10(3):260-3
Date
May-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - chemically induced - epidemiology
Adult
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Diet - adverse effects
Endometrial Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Estrogen Replacement Therapy - adverse effects - classification - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Medical Records - standards
Mental Recall
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Questionnaires - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Time Factors
Abstract
There have been relatively few epidemiological studies to verify the information obtained from study participants on the use of menopausal hormone replacement therapy. We conducted this study as part of a case-control study of diet, hormone use, and endometrial cancer in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, 1994-1998. We compared records from 653 subjects, 30-79 years of age, with reports from their physicians on ever/never use of hormone replacement therapy and duration, type, and dose of hormone replacement therapy. A total of 88% of the interview records were in agreement with physician reports for ever/never use of hormone replacement therapy. The overall kappa value for ever/never use agreement was 0.76 (range = 0.71-0.81), and the intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.64 (range = 0.57-0.70) for duration of hormone replacement therapy use, indicating good agreement; similar correlations were seen among cases and controls for overall use, as well as estrogen- or progestogen-alone use. Concordance for brand codes was observed for about 43% of the subjects. This study suggests that information obtained by interview in case-control studies provides a reasonable measure of ever use of hormone replacement therapy and duration of use. Interviews, however, do not represent a reliable source of information on brands and dosage of hormone replacement therapy preparations.
PubMed ID
10230835 View in PubMed
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[Alarming data on the risk of breast cancer following estrogen replacement therapy should be interpreted carefully]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16989
Source
Lakartidningen. 2005 Apr 18-24;102(16):1217-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Viveca Odlind
Author Affiliation
Läkemedelsverket, Uppsala. viveca.odlind@mpa.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2005 Apr 18-24;102(16):1217-8
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Estrogen Replacement Therapy - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
PubMed ID
15921094 View in PubMed
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Alcohol and breast cancer in women: a pooled analysis of cohort studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10930
Source
JAMA. 1998 Feb 18;279(7):535-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-18-1998
Author
S A Smith-Warner
D. Spiegelman
S S Yaun
P A van den Brandt
A R Folsom
R A Goldbohm
S. Graham
L. Holmberg
G R Howe
J R Marshall
A B Miller
J D Potter
F E Speizer
W C Willett
A. Wolk
D J Hunter
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Mass 02115, USA.
Source
JAMA. 1998 Feb 18;279(7):535-40
Date
Feb-18-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology
Diet
Estrogen Replacement Therapy
Female
Humans
Likelihood Functions
Linear Models
Menarche
Menopause
Multivariate Analysis
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To assess the risk of invasive breast cancer associated with total and beverage-specific alcohol consumption and to evaluate whether dietary and nondietary factors modify the association. DATA SOURCES: We included in these analyses 6 prospective studies that had at least 200 incident breast cancer cases, assessed long-term intake of food and nutrients, and used a validated diet assessment instrument. The studies were conducted in Canada, the Netherlands, Sweden, and the United States. Alcohol intake was estimated by food frequency questionnaires in each study. The studies included a total of 322647 women evaluated for up to 11 years, including 4335 participants with a diagnosis of incident invasive breast cancer. DATA EXTRACTION: Pooled analysis of primary data using analyses consistent with each study's original design and the random-effects model for the overall pooled analyses. DATA SYNTHESIS: For alcohol intakes less than 60 g/d (reported by >99% of participants), risk increased linearly with increasing intake; the pooled multivariate relative risk for an increment of 10 g/d of alcohol (about 0.75-1 drink) was 1.09 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.04-1.13; P for heterogeneity among studies, .71). The multivariate-adjusted relative risk for total alcohol intakes of 30 to less than 60 g/d (about 2-5 drinks) vs nondrinkers was 1.41 (95% CI, 1.18-1.69). Limited data suggested that alcohol intakes of at least 60 g/d were not associated with further increased risk. The specific type of alcoholic beverage did not strongly influence risk estimates. The association between alcohol intake and breast cancer was not modified by other factors. CONCLUSIONS: Alcohol consumption is associated with a linear increase in breast cancer incidence in women over the range of consumption reported by most women. Among women who consume alcohol regularly, reducing alcohol consumption is a potential means to reduce breast cancer risk.
Notes
Comment In: JAMA. 1998 Oct 7;280(13):1138-99777807
PubMed ID
9480365 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alternative drug use for the climacteric in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208597
Source
Maturitas. 1997 May;27(1):5-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1997
Author
T. Mäntyranta
E. Hemminki
I. Kangas
P. Topo
A. Uutela
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland. taina.mantyranta@helsinki.fi
Source
Maturitas. 1997 May;27(1):5-11
Date
May-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Climacteric
Complementary Therapies
Educational Status
Estrogen Replacement Therapy
Female
Finland
Food, Fortified
Humans
Middle Aged
Nonprescription Drugs - therapeutic use
Questionnaires
Urban Population
Abstract
To investigate the use of alternative drugs for the climacteric in Finland, which products are used, and who are the women using them.
The study was based on a population-based survey conducted in 1989 among 2000 Finnish women aged 45-64 (response rate 86%).
11% of the women reported the use of alternative drugs for the climacteric. Food supplements and bee products were the most common types of alternative drugs used. Some of them may have allergic or other side effects. Users differ little from other women judging by health habits and the utilization of health care services. The best predictors for alternative drug use were urban residence, more than 9 years of general education, and among 50 54-year olds, the use of prescription or OTC drugs for menopause. Over half of the users of alternative drugs had also used hormone therapy.
Women using alternative drugs during and after the climacteric represent a large group. More information is needed about the clinical effects of alternative drugs, and the characteristics of alternative drug users.
PubMed ID
9158072 View in PubMed
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Alternatives to hormone replacement therapy: a multi-method study of women's experiences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167901
Source
Complement Ther Med. 2006 Sep;14(3):185-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
C Nadine Wathen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences, McMaster University, Patterson Building, Chedoke Hospital, West Hamilton, Ont., Canada L8N 3Z5. wathenn@mcmaster.ca
Source
Complement Ther Med. 2006 Sep;14(3):185-92
Date
Sep-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Complementary Therapies - utilization
Estrogen Replacement Therapy - utilization
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Postmenopause
Abstract
To explore women's decision-making regarding use of complementary and alternative medicines (CAM) during menopause.
Qualitative interviews were conducted with 20 women who were currently or had previously used hormone replacement therapy (HRT), including questions about their experiences with alternatives to HRT. This was followed by a non-random questionnaire survey of 285 demographically representative Canadian women aged 45-65 who were current or former HRT users.
Fifty-seven percent (57%, n = 162) of women reported either having used or considered a CAM approach for menopause. Women who had tried or considered CAM were significantly younger (mean age = 54.9 years versus 56.8 years; t(280) = 3.4, p
PubMed ID
16911898 View in PubMed
Less detail

Anthropometric measures and the risk of endometrial cancer, overall and by tumor microsatellite status and histological subtype.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113894
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2013 Jun 15;177(12):1378-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-15-2013
Author
Ernest K Amankwah
Christine M Friedenreich
Anthony M Magliocco
Rollin Brant
Kerry S Courneya
Thomas Speidel
Wahida Rahman
Annie R Langley
Linda S Cook
Author Affiliation
Department of Cancer Epidemiology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida, USA.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2013 Jun 15;177(12):1378-87
Date
Jun-15-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alberta
Body mass index
Body Weights and Measures
Contraceptives, Oral - administration & dosage
Endometrial Neoplasms - classification - epidemiology - genetics
Estrogen Replacement Therapy
Female
Humans
Menarche
Menopause
Microsatellite Instability
Microsatellite Repeats
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology
Parity
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Obesity is an established risk factor for endometrial cancer, but this association is not well understood for subtypes of endometrial cancer. We evaluated the association of recent and adult-life obesity with subtypes of endometrial cancer based on microsatellite status (microsatellite-stable (MSS) vs. microsatellite-instable (MSI)) and histology (type I vs. type II). Analyses were based on a population-based case-control study (524 cases and 1,032 controls) conducted in Alberta, Canada (2002-2006) and included the following groupings of subtypes: MSS = 337 and MSI = 130; type I = 458 and type II = 66. Logistic and polytomous logistic regression were used to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for overall endometrial cancer and subtypes of endometrial cancer, respectively. The risks of all subtypes of endometrial cancer, except type II, increased with an increase in all of the anthropometric characteristics examined. The risks for MSI tumors were suggestively stronger than those for MSS tumors; the risk with high (=30) body mass index (weight (kg)/height (m)(2)) was significantly stronger for MSI tumors (odds ratio = 4.96, 95% confidence interval: 2.76, 8.91) than for MSS tumors (odds ratio = 2.33, 95% confidence interval: 1.66, 3.28) (P-heterogeneity = 0.02). Obesity is associated with most subtypes of endometrial cancer, and further studies are warranted to elucidate the biological mechanisms underlying the stronger risk for the MSI subtype with a high body mass index.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23673247 View in PubMed
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Apoptosis, proliferation, and sex steroid receptors in postmenopausal endometrium before and during HRT.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178021
Source
Maturitas. 2004 Oct 15;49(2):114-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-15-2004
Author
Marju Dahmoun
Inga-Stina Odmark
Björn Risberg
Mats G Karlsson
Tatjana Pavlenko
Torbjörn Bäckström
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Mid Sweden Research and Development Center, Sundsvall Hospital, SE-851 86 Sundsvall, Sweden. marju.dahmoun@lvn.se
Source
Maturitas. 2004 Oct 15;49(2):114-23
Date
Oct-15-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Apoptosis - drug effects
Biopsy
Cell Proliferation - drug effects
Endometrium - cytology - drug effects - metabolism
Estradiol - administration & dosage
Estrogen Receptor alpha - drug effects - metabolism
Estrogen Replacement Therapy - adverse effects
Estrogens, Conjugated (USP) - administration & dosage
Female
Humans
Ki-67 Antigen - analysis
Medroxyprogesterone Acetate - administration & dosage
Middle Aged
Norethindrone - administration & dosage - analogs & derivatives
Postmenopause
Prospective Studies
Receptors, Progesterone - drug effects - metabolism
Regression Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Uterine Hemorrhage - chemically induced - metabolism
Abstract
Endometrial homeostasis, indicated as the balance between apoptosis and proliferation, was studied with regard to endometrial safety and bleeding disturbances.
The quantitatively sufficient endometrial biopsies of 92 postmenopausal women enrolled in the study were investigated. The participants were divided into two groups, each receiving a continuous combined HRT regimen with either conjugated estrogen (CE) 0.625 mg + 5 mg medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) (=CE/MPA) or 17-beta-estradiol (E2) 2 mg + 1 mg norethisterone acetate (NETA) (=E2/NETA). These were evaluated according to apoptotic index (Ai) and proliferation marker Ki-67 index. Estrogen receptor alpha (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) expression were also monitored, as well as endometrial thickness. Quantitative in situ techniques were used.
Ai and Ki-67 index were unchanged in epithelial glands of endometrium from baseline to second biopsy obtained after 1 year of combined continuous HRT. In stromal tissue, Ki-67 index was increased, while Ai was on the same level. PR expression in both epithelium and stroma was unchanged. Endometrial thickness was unaffected during therapy, and the histopathological evaluation showed no development of hyperplasia or carcinoma.
The unaffected homeostasis in endometrial epithelium contributes to endometrial safety and is in accordance with the histopathological findings of no hyperplasia. The homeostasis of stroma was transformed to be more proliferative. Increased stromal proliferation may be of importance for stromal support of the veins and for decreasing breakthrough bleeding during HRT. The increased stromal proliferation, as well as the decreased ER expression both in epithelium and stroma, could be an effect of progesterone.
PubMed ID
15474755 View in PubMed
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431 records – page 1 of 44.