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101 records – page 1 of 11.

Age-related changes in antral follicle count among women with and without polycystic ovaries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162181
Source
Gynecol Obstet Invest. 2007;64(4):199-203
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Mohammed Al-Sunaidi
Sharifa Al-Mahrizi
Seang Lin Tan
Togas Tulandi
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, McGill University, Montreal, Que., Canada.
Source
Gynecol Obstet Invest. 2007;64(4):199-203
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Age Factors
Estradiol - blood
Female
Follicle Stimulating Hormone - blood
Follicular Phase - physiology
Humans
Medical Records
Ovarian Follicle - physiology
Polycystic Ovary Syndrome - blood - physiopathology
Quebec
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
To evaluate follicular phase antral follicle count (AFC) in women of different ages with and without polycystic ovaries (PCO) and to correlate it with early follicular phase serum follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), estradiol, and ovarian volume.
Retrospective analysis of 1,003 patients' medical records at McGill Reproductive Center. AFC, ovarian volume, serum FSH and estradiol were evaluated and analyzed.
The mean numbers of AFC in women without PCO in the age-groups 19-24, 25-29, 30-34, 35-39, 40-44 years were 16, 13, 13, 10, and 6, and in those with MCO 41, 38, 33, 33 and 34 respectively. In women without MCO, AFC was associated with the strongest correlation with age (r: -0.50, p
PubMed ID
17664881 View in PubMed
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Androgens and estrogens in relation to hot flushes during the menopausal transition.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191828
Source
Maturitas. 2002 Jan 30;41(1):69-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-30-2002
Author
Inger Øverlie
Mette Haase Moen
Arne Holte
Arnstein Finset
Author Affiliation
Department of Behavioural Sciences in Medicine, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1111, Blindern, N-0317 Oslo, Norway. inger.overlie@basalmed.uio.no
Source
Maturitas. 2002 Jan 30;41(1):69-77
Date
Jan-30-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Androstenedione - blood
Dehydroepiandrosterone Sulfate - blood
Estradiol - blood
Female
Follicle Stimulating Hormone - blood
Hormones - blood
Hot Flashes - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Luteinizing Hormone - blood
Menopause
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Testosterone - blood
Thyrotropin - blood
Abstract
In this paper, the association of hormones to vasomotor complaints during the menopausal transition is discussed. Fifty-seven regularly menstruating women without history of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) were selected for a longitudinal, prospective study around the menopausal transition. The mean age at the start of the study was 51.3 (+/-2.0) years. At intervals of 12 months all women went through a semi-structured interview and filled in questionnaires. Venous blood samples were collected every 12-month for analyses of estradiol (E2), testosterone, androstendione, dehydroepiandrosterone-sulphate (DHEA-S), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), thyrotropin (TSH), and luteinizing hormone (LH). Vasomotor complaints were tested using questions about hot flushes and bouts of sweating in terms of occurrence, frequency and degree of distress. Forty-six percent of the subjects reported hot flushes and bouts of sweating before menopause, increasing to 67% during the first year after menopause and 49% in the second year postmenopause. Low levels of estradiol and high levels of FSH were associated with vasomotor complaints before menopause. During menopause high levels of TSH were related to vasomotor complaints. The first year after menopause, women, who at this point achieved hot flushes, were characterised by high levels of E2, but declining and low levels of FSH, but increasing. Postmenopausal, high levels of testosterone and DHEA-S seemed to protect against vasomotor symptoms. Our most important finding was, that among women who achieved hot flushes at the first assessment postmenopause, the high androgen levels was a significant predictor of recovery from hot flushes at the last assessment, 1 year later.
PubMed ID
11809345 View in PubMed
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An estrogen-associated dietary pattern and breast cancer risk in the Swedish Mammography Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267373
Source
Int J Cancer. 2015 Nov 1;137(9):2149-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1-2015
Author
Holly R Harris
Leif Bergkvist
Alicja Wolk
Source
Int J Cancer. 2015 Nov 1;137(9):2149-54
Date
Nov-1-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - blood - epidemiology - etiology - radiography
Diet
Estradiol - blood
Estrone - analogs & derivatives - blood
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Mammary Glands, Human - pathology
Mammography
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
High endogenous hormone levels have been associated with breast cancer and dietary factors have the potential to influence breast cancer risk through effects on hormone levels. Dietary patterns derived from reduced rank regression provide a way to identify food groups correlated with hormones and subsequently examine food patterns that may be associated with breast cancer risk. We investigated whether a dietary pattern previously correlated with estradiol and estrone sulfate was associated with breast cancer in the prospective Swedish Mammography Cohort. Among 37,004 primarily postmenopausal women diet was assessed with a food frequency questionnaire. Cox proportional hazard models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). During 15 years of follow-up 1,603 cases of breast cancer were identified. A higher estrogen dietary pattern score was associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. Women in the highest quartile of estrogen pattern score had a 29% (95% CI = 1.08-1.55) increased risk of breast cancer compared to women in the lowest quartile (p(trend) = 0.006). When the association was examined by estrogen-receptor status, it was only significant for those with estrogen-receptor-positive tumors; however, in the competing risk analysis there were no significant differences in the effect estimates by receptor subtype (p(heterogeneity) = 0.65). Our findings suggest that a dietary pattern associated with higher estrogen levels may increase breast cancer risk. However, whether the influence of this dietary pattern is through a direct effect on estrogen levels deserves further study.
PubMed ID
25924604 View in PubMed
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An international study of the relationship between alcohol consumption and postmenopausal estradiol levels.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12094
Source
Alcohol Alcohol Suppl. 1991;1:327-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
J S Gavaler
K. Love
D. Van Thiel
S. Farholt
C. Gluud
E. Monteiro
A. Galvao-Teles
T C Ortega
V. Cuervas-Mons
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, PA 15261.
Source
Alcohol Alcohol Suppl. 1991;1:327-30
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - blood
Body mass index
Comparative Study
Denmark
Estradiol - blood
Female
Humans
Menopause - blood
Middle Aged
Pennsylvania
Portugal
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Spain
Temperance
Abstract
Because of the beneficial effect of estrogens on the risk of cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis in postmenopausal women, the factors which influence endogenous postmenopausal estrogen levels are of substantial importance. The major source of postmenopausal estrogen is the aromatization of androgens to estrogens. Because alcohol is reported to increase aromatization rates, the relationship between serum estradiol and moderate alcohol consumption was examined in a group of 128 healthy Pittsburgh postmenopausal women, and a significant direct association was found. In order to address the generalizability of this finding, 3 comparable study populations of healthy postmenopausal women were recruited: 62 in Copenhagen, 34 in Lisbon and 20 in Madrid. Although no association was detected in the Madrid study sample, in both the Copenhagen and Lisbon study populations, not only were estradiol levels significantly increased in alcohol users as compared to abstainers, but also estradiol levels were significantly correlated with total weekly drinks consumed. Based on these findings in study samples of healthy postmenopausal women from Pittsburgh, Copenhagen and Lisbon, we conclude that the increase in estradiol levels seen with moderate alcoholic beverage consumption is not an isolated finding and speculate that moderate alcohol consumption by healthy postmenopausal women may have beneficial effects.
PubMed ID
1845556 View in PubMed
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Annual changes in serum sex steroids in male and female black (Ursus americanus) and polar (Ursus maritimus) bears.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65412
Source
Biol Reprod. 1988 Jun;38(5):1044-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1988
Author
S S Palmer
R A Nelson
M A Ramsay
I. Stirling
J M Bahr
Author Affiliation
Department of Animal Sciences, University of Illinois, Urbana 61801.
Source
Biol Reprod. 1988 Jun;38(5):1044-50
Date
Jun-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Behavior, Animal
Carnivora - physiology
Climate
Cold Climate
Estradiol - blood
Female
Food
Gonadal Steroid Hormones - blood
Hibernation
Male
Periodicity
Pregnancy
Progesterone - blood
Reference Values
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Seasons
Testosterone - blood
Ursidae - blood - physiology
Abstract
The adaptation of black and polar bears to their environments is proportional to the severity of climate and food restriction. Both black and polar bears mate during the spring, despite differences in their recent metabolic state. Reproductive activity in black bears follows 4 mo of torpor, whereas reproduction in polar bears occurs prior to torpor. The goals of this study were to measure the annual changes in serum sex steroids in male and female black and polar bears, and to determine if changes in serum levels of these steroids were associated with metabolic condition or photoperiod. Serum testosterone (T) concentrations were elevated during spring in black and polar bears. Moreover, this increase in serum T in polar bears during spring was correlated with age and testis size. Serum progesterone (P4) concentrations increased in pregnant polar bears in fall coincident with the time of expected implantation. No increases in serum P4 were observed in nonpregnant black and polar bears. Serum estradiol (E2) was elevated in nonpregnant and pregnant polar bears 2 mo prior to the time of expected implantation. We found that serum sex steroids measured in black and polar bears change independent of torpor. Therefore, our results suggest that photoperiod may be a more important regulator of serum steroid levels and reproduction than metabolic condition.
PubMed ID
3408772 View in PubMed
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Assessment of endometrial and ovarian characteristics using three dimensional power Doppler ultrasound to predict response in frozen embryo transfer cycles.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98513
Source
Reprod Biol Endocrinol. 2009;7:151
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Tamara Zácková
Ilkka Y Järvelä
Juha S Tapanainen
Jaroslav Feyereisl
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland. tamara.zackova@centrum.cz
Source
Reprod Biol Endocrinol. 2009;7:151
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Chorionic Gonadotropin - blood
Cryopreservation
Embryo Transfer - methods
Endometrium - metabolism - physiology - ultrasonography
Estradiol - blood
Female
Fertilization in Vitro
Humans
Imaging, Three-Dimensional
Infertility - therapy
Ovary - metabolism - physiology - ultrasonography
Predictive value of tests
Pregnancy
Progesterone - blood
Sperm Injections, Intracytoplasmic
Treatment Outcome
Ultrasonography, Doppler
Vagina - ultrasonography
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether endometrial or ovarian parameters as measured using 3D power Doppler ultrasound would predict the outcome in frozen embryo transfer (FET) cycles. METHODS: Thirty women with no known gynecological pathology undergoing FET were recruited. The FET was carried out in the natural menstrual cycle 3-4 days after the first positive LH test result. Blood samples for hormonal analysis were collected, and three-dimensional (3D) ultrasonographic examination was performed on the day of the FET and repeated with analysis of the total hCG one week later. RESULTS: The demographic, clinical, and embryological characteristics were similar between the pregnant (15/30) and nonpregnant groups (15/30). There were no differences between the groups in endometrial/subendometrial thickness, volume, or vascularization index (VI). The endometrial triple-line pattern was more often present in the pregnant group on the day of the FET (93.3% vs. 40.0%, 95% CI 25.5-81.2%). No differences in the ovaries were observed on the day of the FET. At the second visit, the triple-line pattern was still more often present in those patients who had conceived (91.7% vs. 42.9%, 95% CI 18.5-79.1%), and their corpus luteum was more active as judged by the rise in 17-hydroxyprogesterone and estradiol levels. No differences were observed in the dominant ovarian vasculature. CONCLUSIONS: According to our results, measurement of power Doppler indices using 3D ultrasound on the day of the FET does not provide any additional information concerning the outcome of the cycle. The existence of the triple-line pattern on the day of the FET seems to be a prognostic sign of a prosperous outcome after FET. The dominant ovary in the pregnant group seems to be already activated one week after the FET.
PubMed ID
20035622 View in PubMed
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The association of bone metabolism with bone mineral density, serum sex hormone concentrations, and regular exercise in middle-aged men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179135
Source
Bone. 2004 Aug;35(2):439-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2004
Author
T. Remes
S B Väisänen
A. Mahonen
J. Huuskonen
H. Kröger
J S Jurvelin
I M Penttilä
R. Rauramaa
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Biochemistry, University of Kuopio, Kuopio, Finland. tremes@hytti.uku.fi
Source
Bone. 2004 Aug;35(2):439-47
Date
Aug-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Acid Phosphatase - blood
Anthropometry
Bone Density
Bone and Bones - metabolism
Estradiol - blood
Exercise
Finland
Humans
Isoenzymes - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Osteocalcin - blood
Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin - metabolism
Testosterone - blood
Abstract
Physical activity is an important factor in attaining bone mass. Our aim was to investigate if low to moderate intensity exercise affects bone resorption [serum tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) 5b activity] and formation (serum osteocalcin concentration) in a randomized controlled exercise intervention trial in Finnish middle-aged men. In addition, the relations of these bone turnover markers with bone mineral density (BMD) and serum sex hormone concentrations [circulating testosterone (T), estradiol (E2), and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) concentrations] were evaluated. Serum TRAP 5b activity and osteocalcin concentration were measured at randomization and after 1 and 4 years of the exercise intervention. BMDs of the lumbar spine (L2-L4), femoral neck, and total proximal femur were measured with a dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). At randomization, TRAP 5b activity was strongly correlated with the osteocalcin concentration (Spearman r = 0.541, P
PubMed ID
15268895 View in PubMed
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Body mass index in relation to semen quality and reproductive hormones among 1,558 Danish men

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9365
Source
Fertil Steril. 2004 Oct;82(4):863-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2004
Author
Jensen, TK
Andersson, A-M
Jørgensen, N
Andersen, A-G
Carlsen, E
Petersen, JM
Skakkebaek, NE
Author Affiliation
University Department of Growth and Reproduction, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. tkjensen@health.sdu.dk
Source
Fertil Steril. 2004 Oct;82(4):863-70
Date
Oct-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alcohol Drinking
Body mass index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Estradiol - blood
Gonadal Steroid Hormones - blood
Humans
Inhibins - blood
Linear Models
Luteinizing Hormone - blood
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Semen - physiology
Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin - metabolism
Smoking
Sperm Count
Sperm Motility - physiology
Testis - physiology
Testosterone - blood
Urban Population
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To examine the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and semen quality among young men from the general population. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: Danish young men were approached when they attended a compulsory physical examination to determine their fitness for military service. PATIENT(S): From 1996-1998, 1,558 (19%) young men (mean age 19 years) volunteered. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Semen volume (in milliliters), sperm concentration (in million per milliliter), percentage of motile spermatozoa, percentage of spermatozoa with normal morphology, total sperm count (in million), and testis size (in milliliters). In addition, serum reproductive hormones were measured. RESULT(S): Serum T, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), and inhibin B all decreased with increasing BMI, whereas free androgen index and E(2) increased with increasing BMI. Serum FSH was higher among slim men. After control for confounders, men with a BMI 25 kg/m(2) had a reduction in sperm concentration and total sperm count of 21.6% (95% CI 4.0%-39.4%) and 23.9% (95% CI 4.7%-43.2%), respectively, compared to men with BMI between 20-25 kg/m(2). Percentages of normal spermatozoa were reduced, although not significantly, among men with high or low BMI. Semen volume and percentage of motile spermatozoa were not affected by BMI. CONCLUSION(S): High or low BMI was associated with reduced semen quality. It remains to be seen whether the increasing occurrence of obesity in the Western world may contribute to an epidemic of poor semen quality registered in some of the same countries. If so, some cases of subfertility may be preventable.
PubMed ID
15482761 View in PubMed
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Circannual concentrations of melatonin, gonadotrophins, prolactin and gonadal steroids in males in a geographical area with a large annual variation in daylight.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature238502
Source
Acta Endocrinol (Copenh). 1985 Aug;109(4):446-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1985
Author
H. Martikainen
J. Tapanainen
O. Vakkuri
J. Leppäluoto
I. Huhtaniemi
Source
Acta Endocrinol (Copenh). 1985 Aug;109(4):446-50
Date
Aug-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Estradiol - blood
Finland
Follicle Stimulating Hormone - blood
Gonadotropins, Pituitary - blood
Humans
Light
Luteinizing Hormone - blood
Male
Melatonin - blood
Periodicity
Pineal Gland - physiology
Pituitary Gland - physiology
Prolactin - blood
Seasons
Testis - physiology
Abstract
This study was aimed at elucidating the possible effects of a large annual variation in photoperiodicity on the secretory activities of the pineal gland, pituitary and testes. Serum daytime melatonin, FSH, LH, prolactin (Prl), testosterone and oestradiol concentrations were determined monthly over a year in 24 healthy young adult men (except for melatonin which was analysed only in 11 subjects) in northern Finland, where the day length is 22 h in mid-summer and 3.5 h in mid-winter. Serum daytime melatonin levels showed two annual peak values, in December and May, and a nadir was observed in August. The absolute values of the other hormones measured did not show significant month to month variation over the observation period. When hormone levels were calculated as percentages of the individual annual means, several significant differences were found between monthly levels. The melatonin peak in May (133 +/- 20%, SE, of the annual mean) was associated with significant increases in LH (110 +/- 4%) and FSH (107 +/- 3%). Prl levels (115 +/- 9%) reached a maximum in January. The nadirs of melatonin and the pituitary hormones measured were seen in August. Oestradiol showed the highest values in April-June, but no significant variation was found in serum testosterone levels. Positive correlations were observed between FSH and LH (r = 0.41, P less than 0.01), and Prl and LH (r = 0.26, P less than 0.01), whereas Prl and testosterone (r = -0.17, P less than 0.01) were inversely correlated.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
3929512 View in PubMed
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Circulating estradiol is an independent predictor of progression of carotid artery intima-media thickness in middle-aged men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80899
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2006 Nov;91(11):4433-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
Tivesten Asa
Hulthe Johannes
Wallenfeldt Karin
Wikstrand John
Ohlsson Claes
Fagerberg Björn
Author Affiliation
Institute of Internal Medicine, The Wallenberg Laboratory for Cardiovascular Research, Bruna Stråket 16, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden. asa.tivesten@medic.gu.se
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2006 Nov;91(11):4433-7
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Carotid Arteries - anatomy & histology
Carotid Artery Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Cohort Studies
Disease Progression
Estradiol - blood
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Risk factors
Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin - analysis
Testosterone - blood
Tunica Intima - anatomy & histology
Tunica Media - anatomy & histology
Abstract
CONTEXT: Estrogen treatment of men with prostate cancer is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality; however, the role of endogenous estrogen levels for atherosclerotic disease in men is unknown. OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to determine whether endogenous serum estradiol (E2) levels predict the progression of carotid artery intima-media thickness in men. DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: This was a population-based, prospective cohort study (the Atherosclerosis and Insulin Resistance study) conducted in Göteborg, Sweden, among 313 Caucasian men without cardiovascular or other clinically overt diseases. Carotid artery intima-media thickness, an index of preclinical atherosclerosis, was measured by ultrasound at baseline (58 yr of age) and after 3 yr of follow-up. Serum sex hormone levels and cardiovascular risk factors (body mass index, waist to hip ratio, systolic blood pressure, serum triglycerides, plasma c-peptide, and smoking status) were assessed at study entry. INTERVENTION: There was no intervention. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Association between baseline total and free E2 levels and progression of carotid intima-media thickness over 3 yr with adjustments for cardiovascular risk factors was measured. RESULTS: In univariate analyses, both total and free E2 levels at baseline were positively associated with the annual change in intima-media thickness. In linear regression models including E2 and cardiovascular risk factors, low-density lipoprotein and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and E2 were identified as independent predictors of progression of carotid artery intima-media thickness (total E2 beta = 0.187, P = 0.001; and free E2 beta = 0.183, P = 0.003). CONCLUSIONS: Circulating E2 is a predictor of progression of carotid artery intima-media thickness in middle-aged men. Further studies are needed to investigate the role of endogenous E2 for incident cardiovascular disease events.
PubMed ID
16940451 View in PubMed
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101 records – page 1 of 11.