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Abdominal Aortic Calcifications Predict Survival in Peritoneal Dialysis Patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298110
Source
Perit Dial Int. 2018 Sep-Oct; 38(5):366-373
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Observational Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Author
Satu Mäkelä
Markku Asola
Henrik Hadimeri
James Heaf
Maija Heiro
Leena Kauppila
Susanne Ljungman
Mai Ots-Rosenberg
Johan V Povlsen
Björn Rogland
Petra Roessel
Jana Uhlinova
Maarit Vainiotalo
Maria K Svensson
Heini Huhtala
Heikki Saha
Author Affiliation
Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland satu.m.makela@pshp.fi.
Source
Perit Dial Int. 2018 Sep-Oct; 38(5):366-373
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Observational Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Ankle Brachial Index
Aorta, Abdominal - diagnostic imaging
Aortic Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Cause of Death - trends
Critical Illness - mortality - therapy
Denmark - epidemiology
Estonia - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Peritoneal Dialysis - adverse effects - mortality
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Renal Dialysis
Risk factors
Survival Rate - trends
Sweden - epidemiology
Ultrasonography, Doppler
Vascular Calcification - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
Peripheral arterial disease and vascular calcifications contribute significantly to the outcome of dialysis patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic role of severity of abdominal aortic calcifications and peripheral arterial disease on outcome of peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients using methods easily available in everyday clinical practice.
We enrolled 249 PD patients (mean age 61 years, 67% male) in this prospective, observational, multicenter study from 2009 to 2013. The abdominal aortic calcification score (AACS) was assessed using lateral lumbar X ray, and the ankle-brachial index (ABI) using a Doppler device.
The median AACS was 11 (range 0 - 24). In 58% of the patients, all 4 segments of the abdominal aorta showed deposits, while 19% of patients had no visible deposits (AACS 0). Ankle-brachial index was normal in 49%, low ( 1.3) in 34% of patients. Altogether 91 patients (37%) died during the median follow-up of 46 months. Only 2 patients (5%) with AACS 0 died compared with 50% of the patients with AACS = 7 (p
PubMed ID
29386304 View in PubMed
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Acute de novo Leukemia in Estonia and Western Sweden 1982-2006: Positive Trend in the Survival of Acute Leukemia over 25 Years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278078
Source
Acta Haematol. 2016;136(3):167-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Erik Hulegårdh
Mari Punab
Erik Holmberg
Katrin Palk
Edward Laane
Hele Everaus
Lovisa Wennström
Dick Stockelberg
Source
Acta Haematol. 2016;136(3):167-73
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Disease-Free Survival
Estonia - epidemiology
Female
Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation
Humans
Leukemia - diagnosis - mortality - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Retrospective Studies
Socioeconomic Factors
Survival Rate
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
This study focuses on the incidence, treatment, and survival of de novo acute leukemia in a 25-year perspective in western Sweden and Estonia. At the beginning of our study, Estonia was a part of the Eastern bloc with planned economy, but since 1991 it is a member of the European Union and transforming into a market economy. Survival rates have steadily increased in both countries. However, a gap between their survival curves remains. Based on our data, it is difficult to explain the big difference in the 5-year relative survival in favor of western Sweden (55 vs. 22%). In Germany, there was a big difference in overall cancer survival between East and West Germany after the fall of the iron curtain, but today no difference is seen. Differences in survival are probably due to a higher proportion of intense chemotherapy regimens and a higher rate of hematopoietic stem cell transplantations in Sweden. Other important factors might be better supportive care and diagnostics as well as better adjuvant therapy. Better staff training and conditions in wards are also factors that might play an essential role.
PubMed ID
27537981 View in PubMed
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Acute upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage in Central Finland Province, Finland, and in Tartu County, Estonia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209823
Source
Ann Chir Gynaecol. 1997;86(3):222-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
J. Soplepmann
M. Udd
A. Peetsalu
A. Palmu
Author Affiliation
Second Department of Surgery, Tartu University Hospital, Estonia.
Source
Ann Chir Gynaecol. 1997;86(3):222-8
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Estonia - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Abstract
A comparative study of the epidemiology of acute upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage (UGIH) was carried out in Central Finland province (CF), Finland, and in Tartu county (TC), Estonia.
All patients from CF and TC aged > or = 15 who were treated in the Central Hospital of Central Finland and in Tartu University Hospital for UGIH, entered the prospective study during 1 August 1992-31 July 1994. Altogether 298 patients (198 men, 100 women) were treated in CF and 270 patients (159 men, 104 women) in TC.
The overall incidence of UGIH was 68.3/100,000 adults per year in CF and 98.6 in TC. The incidence increased considerably with age: from 3.1 in those aged 20-29 to 314.1 in those > or = 80 in CF, and from 13.2 to 299.1 in TC, respectively. Incidence rates were twice as low in younger age groups in CF compared to TC, almost equalized in those > or = 60 and became even higher in those > or = 80. 63% of the patients (55% men, 79% women) in CF and 49% (35% men, 70% women) in TC were > or = 60. NSAID use before UGIH was equally common (46%) in both regions. Peptic ulcer accounted for over 50% of UGIH cases both in CF and TC. Mortality rate was 8.1% in CF and 9.9% in TC. The main epidemiological differences between the regions are the lower overall incidence of UGIH, due to the lower incidence of haemorrhage in the younger age groups, and the higher proportion of the elderly patients in CF compared to TC.
PubMed ID
9435933 View in PubMed
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Adherence to antiretroviral medications among persons who inject drugs in transitional, low and middle income countries: an international systematic review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268956
Source
AIDS Behav. 2015 Apr;19(4):575-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2015
Author
Jonathan Feelemyer
Don Des Jarlais
Kamyar Arasteh
Anneli Uusküla
Source
AIDS Behav. 2015 Apr;19(4):575-83
Date
Apr-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active
Brazil - epidemiology
China - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Drug Users - statistics & numerical data
Estonia - epidemiology
HIV Infections - drug therapy - epidemiology
Humans
India - epidemiology
Indonesia - epidemiology
Medication Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Russia - epidemiology
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - epidemiology
Vietnam - epidemiology
Abstract
Adherence to antiretroviral (ART) medication is vital to reducing morbidity and mortality among HIV positive persons. People who inject drugs (PWID) are at high risk for HIV infection in transitional/low/middle income countries (TLMIC). We conducted a systematic review of studies reporting adherence to ART among persons with active injection drug use and/or histories of injection drug use in TLMIC. Meta-regression was performed to examine relationships between location, adherence measurements, and follow-up period. Fifteen studies were included from seven countries. Adherence levels ranged from 33 to 97 %; mean weighted adherence was 72 %. ART adherence was associated with different methods of measuring adherence and studies conducted in Eastern Europe and East Asia. The great heterogeneity observed precludes generalization to TLMIC as a whole. Given the critical importance of ART adherence more research is needed on ART adherence among PWID in TLMIC, including the use of standardized methods for reporting adherence to ART.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25331268 View in PubMed
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Adult smoking as a proxy for environmental tobacco smoke exposure among children - comparing the impact of the level of information in Estonia, Finland and Latvia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150353
Source
Prev Med. 2009 Aug-Sep;49(2-3):240-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
Kristiina Patja
Samu Hakala
Ritva Prättälä
Kirstel Ojala
Elena Boldo
Mattias Oberg
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Health and Welfare, Finland. Kristiina.patja@promedico.fi
Source
Prev Med. 2009 Aug-Sep;49(2-3):240-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Estonia - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Latvia - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Parents - psychology
Prevalence
Proxy - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
International comparability of environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure levels is difficult. This study assesses whether estimating children's exposure from information on adult smoking and exposure to ETS makes international comparisons more reliable.
The exposure among children was estimated using three different combinations (models) based on different sets of information on adult smoking, household composition or adult exposure to ETS at home in three cross-sectional nationally representative samples drawn from data sets from Estonia (n=2650), Finland (n=2829) and Latvia (n=5440) in the years 2002 and 2004. The first two models were based on adult smoking and the third also included ETS exposure.
The parental smoking rate was similar to the general smoking prevalence. ETS exposure in non-smoking parents ranged from 22% in Finland to 60% in Latvia. All models gave rather comparative ranges except in Latvia, where the proportion of children with exposure varied from 67% with the simplest model to 81% with the most complex one.
Adult exposure at home or adult smoking prevalence, preferably among people with children, could be used as a proxy for children's exposure to ETS. It is recommended that population questionnaires include detailed information on exposure and household composition.
PubMed ID
19520109 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption in Estonia and Finland: Finbalt survey 1994-2006.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143470
Source
BMC Public Health. 2010;10:261
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Kersti Pärna
Kaja Rahu
Satu Helakorpi
Mare Tekkel
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Tartu, Estonia. kersti.parna@ut.ee
Source
BMC Public Health. 2010;10:261
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - trends
Cross-Sectional Studies
Estonia - epidemiology
Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Linear Models
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Sex Distribution
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Alcohol consumption has been regarded as an important contributor to the high premature mortality rates. The objective of this paper was to provide an overview and comparison of alcohol consumption and its socio-demographic determinants among adults in Estonia and Finland.
The study was based on a 25-64-year-old subsample of nationally representative postal cross-sectional surveys conducted in Estonia (n = 10,340) and Finland (n = 19,672) during 1994-2006. Abstinence, frequency, and the amount of alcohol consumed were examined. Logistic regression models were used to test the socio-demographic differences in alcohol consumption at least once a week. The effect of socio-demographic factors on pure alcohol consumed per week was calculated using linear regression.
The proportion of abstainers was 1.5 times higher among women than men in both countries. Throughout the study period, the amount of alcohol consumed per week increased for both genders in Estonia and for women in Finland, but was stable for men in Finland. In the final study year, medium risk amount of alcohol consumed per week was nearly 1.5 times higher among men in Estonia than in Finland, but about half that among women in Estonia than in Finland. Compared to ethnic majority in Estonia, alcohol consumption at least once a week was lower among men, but amount of pure alcohol drunk per week was higher among women of ethnic minority. In Finland, alcohol consumption at least once a week was more prevalent among women of ethnic minority, but the amount of pure alcohol drunk per week was lower for both gender groups of ethnic minority. Compared to married/cohabiting respondents, alcohol consumption at least once a week was less pronounced among single respondents in Finland, divorced or separated women in both countries, and widowed respondents in Estonia. Greater amount of alcohol consumed per week was more prevalent among single and divorced or separated respondents in Finland, but only among divorced or separated men in Estonia. Frequency of alcohol consumption was lower among less educated than higher educated respondents in Finland, but not in Estonia. The amount of consumed alcohol per week was higher among less educated men in Estonia, but lower among women with basic education in Finland.
Alcohol consumption has increased in Estonia and Finland. National alcohol policies should reflect findings of alcohol epidemiology in order to introduce measures that will reduce alcohol related harm in the population effectively.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20482852 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption in the Baltic Republics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198583
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2000 May;54(5):361-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2000
Author
M. McKee
J. Pomerleau
A. Robertson
I. Pudule
D. Grinberga
K. Kadziauskiene
A. Abaravicius
S. Vaask
Author Affiliation
European Centre on Health of Societies in Transition, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London WC1E 7HT.
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2000 May;54(5):361-6
Date
May-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Beer
Cross-Sectional Studies
Estonia - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Latvia - epidemiology
Lithuania - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Russia - ethnology
Social Class
Socioeconomic Factors
Wine
Abstract
Premature mortality associated with alcohol intake is of particular concern in several countries of the former Soviet Union. This study explored self reported alcohol consumption (beer, wine, spirits) and its determinants in the Baltic Republics.
Cross sectional surveys conducted in 1997.
Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania.
Representative samples of adults age 19-64 (Estonia n=2010; Latvia n=2258; Lithuania n=2139).
Between country differences in the frequency of alcohol intake were estimated. The odds of consuming alcohol weekly according to socioeconomic characteristics (age, ethnicity, rural/urban area, education, income) were calculated using multiple logistic regression analyses, adjusting for all variables simultaneously.
The proportion of respondents consuming alcohol weekly varied by country (p
Notes
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PubMed ID
10814657 View in PubMed
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An analysis of the existing resources in relation to education and treatment of diabetes in four European countries: Estonia, Finland, Ireland, and Lithuania.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137696
Source
Appl Nurs Res. 2011 May;24(2):118-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Aileen Burton
Ìrma Mikkonen
Catherine Buckley
Sile Creedon
Marja-Anneli Hynynen
Marit Kiljako
Lilija Kuzminskiene
Patricia Leahy-Warren
Inga Mikutaviciene
Seija Puputti
Vilma Rasteniene
Riita Riikonen
Piret Simm
Eve-Merike Soovali
Arja-Irene Tiainen
Ritva Väistö
Author Affiliation
Catherine McAuley School of Nursing and Midwifery, University College Cork, Ireland. a.burton@ucc.ie
Source
Appl Nurs Res. 2011 May;24(2):118-23
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cost of Illness
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology - therapy
Estonia - epidemiology
Finland - epidemiology
Health Care Rationing
Humans
Ireland - epidemiology
Lithuania - epidemiology
Patient Education as Topic
Prevalence
Abstract
Diabetes has reached pandemic proportions worldwide. To address and assist health care professionals in maintaining and updating their knowledge base on diabetes care, a multilateral project within the framework of the Lifelong Learning Programme and the Erasmus Curriculum Development - sub programme was initiated in 2008. Four European countries are involved in the project - Estonia, Finland, Ireland and Lithuania. Across all four countries the prevalence of diabetes is rising rapidly. The project's (DIPRA - Counselling for Practice - a pilot of improving counselling quality of diabetes) main product will be an on-line study module on patient education and counselling for health care professionals. The management of diabetes demands a broad range of skills which include, communication, leadership, counselling, teaching and research to name but a few. While it is acknowledged that nurses can incorporate these skills into practice and so benefit the care of the patient there is no uniformity across the four countries studied as to what constitutes a specialist diabetes nurse. The study module and all the materials (databank, on-line lectures, and interactive exercises) will be developed in English and translated into partners' national languages (Estonian, Finnish, Lithuanian) to maximize the accessibility of all professionals in partner countries.
Notes
Comment In: Appl Nurs Res. 2011 May;24(2):124-521193291
PubMed ID
21255975 View in PubMed
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The association between birth size and atopy in young North-European adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51819
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 2005 Aug;35(8):1022-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2005
Author
B N Laerum
C. Svanes
T. Wentzel-Larsen
A. Gulsvik
M. Iversen
T. Gislason
R. Jögi
E. Norrman
C. Janson
E. Omenaas
Author Affiliation
Department of Thoracic Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. birger.lerum@helse-bergen.no
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 2005 Aug;35(8):1022-7
Date
Aug-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Birth Weight - immunology
Denmark - epidemiology
Eczema - epidemiology - immunology
Estonia - epidemiology
Female
Head - anatomy & histology
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Immunoglobulin E - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Population Surveillance - methods
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Hypersensitivity - epidemiology - immunology
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: There is evidence that atopic disorders may begin in intra-uterine life; however, studies of birth characteristics and atopy show conflicting results. METHODS: We wanted to investigate the association of birth weight and head circumference with serum total or specific IgE, allergic rhinitis or eczema while addressing the influence of demographic and geographical factors. In this historic prospective cohort study, data were collected from birth records for 1683 men and women born in 1947-1973, from six Nordic-Baltic populations participating in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey. Blood tests for the measurement of serum total and specific IgE were available for 1494 subjects. In multiple regression analyses, adjustments were made for birth length, gender, age, study centre, adult body mass index, level of education, parental and adult smoking. RESULTS There was no association of birth weight (n=1230) and head circumference (n=285) with serum total IgE, specific IgE antibodies, allergic rhinitis or eczema. There were neither significant interactions by gender or age, nor heterogeneity between the study centres in the analyses of birth weight and adult atopy. CONCLUSION: Birth size was not associated with atopy among adults in this large Nordic-Baltic population study.
PubMed ID
16120083 View in PubMed
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Association between health behaviour and self-reported health in Estonia, Finland, Latvia and Lithuania.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180594
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2004 Mar;14(1):32-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2004
Author
Anu Kasmel
Ville Helasoja
Andrus Lipand
Ritva Prättälä
Jurate Klumbiene
Iveta Pudule
Author Affiliation
University of Southern Denmark, Department of Health Promotion Research. anu@tervis.ee
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2004 Mar;14(1):32-6
Date
Mar-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Diet
Estonia - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Behavior
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Latvia - epidemiology
Life Style
Lithuania - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Self-Assessment
Smoking
Abstract
The aim of the present study is to examine the associations of the selected health behaviours (daily smoking, frequent strong alcohol use, consumption of fresh vegetables less than 3 days a week and leisure time physical activity less than two/three times a week) to the self-assessed health after adjustment to the age and education in Estonia, Finland, Latvia and Lithuania.
Data from cross-sectional surveys carried out in all the above-mentioned countries were used. The methodology and questionnaires of the surveys were standardized between the participating countries within the Finbalt Health Monitor System. Logistic regression was used to assess the effect of self-perceived health status on prevalence of health behaviours.
In Finland both women and men rated their health better than both genders in all the Baltic countries. In Finland self-assessment of health is significantly associated with most health behaviours, but in the Baltic counties the associations are weak or unstable.
The results suggest that in Finland as in many other stable countries self-assessed health status was related to health behaviours and can be used as an indicator of health behaviours. In the Baltic countries, factors other than health behaviours may be more relevant to the self assessment of health status.
PubMed ID
15080388 View in PubMed
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131 records – page 1 of 14.