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[Gastro-hemorrhagic Escherichia coli].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205975
Source
Rev Esp Salud Publica. 1997 Sep-Oct;71(5):437-43
Publication Type
Article
Author
N. Margall
A. Domínguez
G. Prats
L. Salleras
Author Affiliation
Servicio de Microbiología, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona.
Source
Rev Esp Salud Publica. 1997 Sep-Oct;71(5):437-43
Language
Spanish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
England - epidemiology
Escherichia coli
Escherichia coli Infections - complications - microbiology
Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage - epidemiology - etiology - microbiology
Humans
Serotyping
Spain - epidemiology
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Groups of Escherichia coli enteropathogen are described, with special attention to Escherichia coli enterohaemorragic. Some serotypes of Escherichia coli verocitotoxin-producing are able to produce haemorrhagic enteritis, which can develop a complication with hemolityc uraemic syndrome. This complication is most frequent in children and has a high mortality rate. The transmission takes place via food and its capacity to cause epidemic outbreaks together with the seriousness of the complications caused by enteritys make this microorganism of great importance to Public Health. The epidemiology of this microorganism in Spain is reviewed.
PubMed ID
9546864 View in PubMed
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Risk of hemolytic uremic syndrome after sporadic Escherichia coli O157:H7 infection: results of a Canadian collaborative study. Investigators of the Canadian Pediatric Kidney Disease Research Center.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205579
Source
J Pediatr. 1998 May;132(5):777-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1998
Author
P C Rowe
E. Orrbine
H. Lior
G A Wells
E. Yetisir
M. Clulow
P N McLaine
Author Affiliation
Canadian Pediatric Kidney Disease Research Center, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute, Ottawa, Canada.
Source
J Pediatr. 1998 May;132(5):777-82
Date
May-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Alberta - epidemiology
Anemia, Hemolytic - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Creatinine - blood
Escherichia coli Infections - complications - microbiology
Escherichia coli O157
Female
Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Infant
Male
Risk factors
Abstract
The objectives of this study were to better estimate the age-specific risks of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) and hemolytic anemia after Escherichia coli O157:H7 infection among a representative cohort of both referred and nonreferred children with documented illness from the province of Alberta and to compare this with the rates in children evaluated at referral centers in the rest of Canada.
Children with HUS or E. coli O157:H7 gastroenteritis were eligible if they were
Notes
Comment In: J Pediatr. 1998 May;132(5):756-79602178
PubMed ID
9602185 View in PubMed
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Two cases of human urinary tract infection complicated by hemolytic uremic syndrome caused by verotoxin-producing Escherichia coli.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58713
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2000 Sep;31(3):815-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2000
Author
F. Scheutz
B. Olesen
A. Nørgaard
Author Affiliation
The International Escherichia and Klebsiella Centre (World Health Organization), Department of Gastrointestinal Infections, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark. fsc@ssi.dk
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2000 Sep;31(3):815-6
Date
Sep-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Escherichia coli - isolation & purification - metabolism
Escherichia coli Infections - complications - microbiology
Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome - complications - microbiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Shiga Toxins - biosynthesis
Urinary Tract Infections - complications - microbiology
Abstract
In 1993, 2 cases of urinary tract infection (UTI) caused by verotoxin-producing Escherichia coli were diagnosed at Rigshospitalet in Copenhagen, Denmark. Neither of the patients had any previous history of diarrhea. We suggest that E. coli strains isolated from UTI be examined for the production of verotoxin when hemolytic uremic syndrome is clinically suspected.
PubMed ID
11017837 View in PubMed
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