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149 records – page 1 of 15.

Agroenvironmental determinants associated with the presence of antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli in beach waters in Quebec, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132370
Source
Zoonoses Public Health. 2011 Sep;58(6):432-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
P. Turgeon
P. Michel
P. Levallois
P. Chevalier
D. Daignault
B. Crago
R. Irwin
S A McEwen
N F Neumann
M. Louie
Author Affiliation
Faculté de Médecine Vétérinaire, Université de Montréal, Saint-Hyacinthe, QC, Canada. patricia.turgeon@umontreal.ca
Source
Zoonoses Public Health. 2011 Sep;58(6):432-9
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agriculture
Animals
Bathing Beaches
Escherichia coli - isolation & purification
Human Activities
Humans
Lakes - microbiology
Logistic Models
Quebec
Seasons
Time Factors
Water Microbiology
Abstract
Exposure to microorganisms resistant to antimicrobials may constitute a health risk to human populations. It is believed that one route of exposure occurs when people engage in recreational activities in water contaminated with these microorganisms. The main objective of this study was to explore population-level and environmental determinants specifically associated with the presence of antimicrobial resistant (AMR) generic Escherichia coli isolated from recreational waters sampled from beaches located in southern Quebec, Canada. Water samples originated from the Quebec provincial beach surveillance program for the summers of 2004 and 2005. This study focused on three classes of determinants, namely: agricultural, population-level and beach characteristics for a total of 19 specific factors. The study was designed as a retrospective observational analysis and factors were assessed using logistic regression methods. From the multivariable analysis, the data suggested that the percentage of land used for spreading liquid manure was a significant factor associated with the presence of AMR E. coli (OR=27.73). Conceptually, broad factors potentially influencing the presence of AMR bacteria in water must be assessed specifically in addition to factors associated with general microbial contamination. Presence of AMR E. coli in recreational waters from beaches in southern Quebec may represent a risk for people engaging in water activities and this study provides preliminary evidence that agricultural practices, specifically spreading liquid manure in agricultural lands nearby beaches, may be linked to the contamination of these waters by AMR E. coli.
PubMed ID
21824340 View in PubMed
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An enzootic outbreak of acute disease associated with pathogenic E. coli in Adler monkey colony.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276830
Source
J Med Primatol. 2015 Dec;44(6):355-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
Boris A Lapin
Lelita A Yakovleva
Eteri K Dzhikidze
Tatiana E Gvozdik
Aslan A Agumava
Zinaida K Stasilevich
Irina G Danilova
Source
J Med Primatol. 2015 Dec;44(6):355-63
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Disease Outbreaks - veterinary
Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli - isolation & purification
Escherichia coli Infections - epidemiology - microbiology - veterinary
Haplorhini
Housing, Animal
Monkey Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Russia - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
In spring 2009 in Adler colony of the Institute of Medical Primatology, a large enzootic outbreak of acute intestine infection associated with pathogenic E. coli occurred and caused 5% mortality of population (209 animals).
The epidemiological analysis, bacteriological investigation, postmortem examination, histological analysis, and PCR were used to identify the infectious agent.
Marked hemorrhagic diathesis, lethargy, dehydration, diarrhea with blood, wasting, and sometimes dystrophic changes in articular cartilages were noted. Morphologically, hemorrhagic enterocolitis and massive hemorrhages were found. PCR investigation of bacteriologically isolated E. coli characterized it as enteropathogenic and enteroinvasive E. coli.
The outbreak in Adler colony slightly differed from similar outbreak in Florida in 2014 by more marked hemorrhagic diathesis and articular changes in some monkeys caused by polyavitaminosis developed in the course of infection. Sensitive to infection were M. mulatta, M. fascicularis, Cercopithecus aethiops, P. hamadryas and anubis, and Cebus capucinus.
PubMed ID
26215538 View in PubMed
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An outbreak of acute bacterial gastroenteritis is associated with an increased incidence of irritable bowel syndrome in children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145256
Source
Am J Gastroenterol. 2010 Apr;105(4):933-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Marroon Thabane
Marko Simunovic
Noori Akhtar-Danesh
Amit X Garg
William F Clark
Stephen M Collins
Marina Salvadori
John K Marshall
Author Affiliation
Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, and Farncombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Am J Gastroenterol. 2010 Apr;105(4):933-9
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Campylobacter Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Campylobacter jejuni - isolation & purification
Chi-Square Distribution
Child
Disease Outbreaks
Escherichia coli - isolation & purification
Escherichia coli Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Female
Gastroenteritis - epidemiology - microbiology
Humans
Incidence
Irritable Bowel Syndrome - epidemiology - microbiology
Logistic Models
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Abstract
Acute bacterial gastroenteritis is associated with subsequent post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome (PI-IBS) in adults. Less is known about this relationship in children. In May 2000, contamination of municipal water by Escherichia coli 0157:H7 and Campylobacter species caused a large outbreak of acute gastroenteritis in Walkerton, Ontario. We assessed this association among a cohort of children enrolled in the Walkerton Health Study (WHS).
WHS participants who were under age 16 at the time of the outbreak but who reached age 16 during the 8-year study follow-up were eligible for the pediatric PI-IBS study cohort. Eligibility also required no diagnosis of IBS or inflammatory bowel disease before the outbreak and permanent residency in the Walkerton postal code at the time of the outbreak. Validated criteria were used to classify subjects as having had no gastroenteritis (unexposed controls), self-reported gastroenteritis, or clinically suspected gastroenteritis during the outbreak. From 2002 to 2008, standardized biennial interviews used a modified Bowel Disease Questionnaire to diagnose IBS by Rome I criteria. Risk factors for IBS were identified by logistic regression.
In all, 467 subjects were eligible for the pediatric PI-IBS study cohort (47.1% female; mean age 11.6+/-2.44 years at the time of the outbreak). Of these, 305 were exposed to GE (130 clinically suspected and 175 self-reported) and 162 were unexposed controls. The cumulative incidence of IBS was significantly increased among exposed subjects vs. controls (10.5% vs. 2.5%; odds ratio 4.6, 95% confidence interval (1.6, 13.3)). In an unadjusted risk factor analysis, IBS was associated with a shorter time interval from exposure to assessment of IBS symptoms, female gender, diarrheal illness lasting more than 7 days, weight loss >10 lb, and antibiotic use during the outbreak. In adjusted analyses, both female gender and time interval to assessment of IBS symptoms remained independent predictors of PI-IBS.
Acute bacterial gastroenteritis is associated with subsequent IBS in children as in adults. Risk factors for PI-IBS in children are similar to those identified among adults. Confirmation of these findings in similar cohorts is needed.
PubMed ID
20179687 View in PubMed
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An outbreak of diarrhea due to verotoxin-producing Escherichia coli in the Canadian Northwest Territories.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6164
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1994;26(6):675-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
P. Orr
B. Lorencz
R. Brown
R. Kielly
B. Tan
D. Holton
H. Clugstone
L. Lugtig
C. Pim
S. MacDonald
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Microbiology, University of Manitoba, Canada.
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1994;26(6):675-84
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Bacterial Toxins - adverse effects - biosynthesis
Child
Child, Preschool
Cytotoxins - adverse effects - biosynthesis
Diarrhea - epidemiology - microbiology
Disease Outbreaks
Escherichia coli - isolation & purification - metabolism
Escherichia coli Infections - epidemiology - microbiology - transmission
Feces - microbiology
Female
Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome - etiology
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Northwest Territories - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Shiga-Like Toxin I
Abstract
In the summer of 1991 a large outbreak of Escherichia coli O157:H7 associated diarrhea occurred in 6 Inuit communities in the Canadian Northwest Territories. The total population of these communities is 5,292. Of the 521 individuals who developed diarrhea, 152 (29%) were positive for E. coli O157:H7 on stool culture or positive by verotoxin analysis. Median age was 6 years. The attack rate for children
PubMed ID
7747090 View in PubMed
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An outbreak of E. coli O157:H7 hemorrhagic colitis associated with unpasteurized gouda cheese.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174645
Source
Can J Public Health. 2005 May-Jun;96(3):182-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
Lance Honish
Gerry Predy
Nyall Hislop
Linda Chui
Kinga Kowalewska-Grochowska
Larry Trottier
Cornelia Kreplin
Ingrid Zazulak
Author Affiliation
Capital Health-Public Health Division, Edmonton, Alberta. lhonish@cha.ab.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2005 May-Jun;96(3):182-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta - epidemiology
Cheese - microbiology
Cluster analysis
Colitis - epidemiology - microbiology
Disease Outbreaks
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field
Escherichia coli - isolation & purification
Escherichia coli Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Food Handling
Food Microbiology
Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage - epidemiology - microbiology
Humans
Abstract
A cluster of E. coli O157:H7 hemorrhagic colitis was identified in metro Edmonton, Alberta through notifiable disease surveillance in late 2002.
Environmental health officers collected food histories and clinical information from cases in the cluster. The provincial public health laboratory conducted pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis on E. coli O157:H7 isolates from cluster cases. Public health and food regulatory agencies conducted an investigation when a food source (unpasteurized gouda cheese) was implicated.
PFGE analysis revealed an "outbreak" profile in 13 cases. Onset dates for the outbreak cases ranged between October 2002 and February 2003. Two cases, aged 22 months and 4 years, developed hemolytic uremic syndrome as a result of their infection. Consumption of unpasteurized gouda cheese produced at a local dairy farm was reported by 12 of 13 outbreak cases in the 2 to 8 days prior to illness. E. coli O157:H7 was isolated from 2 of 26 cheese samples manufactured by the implicated producer. The cheese isolates had indistinguishable PFGE profiles as compared with outbreak case isolates. Implicated cheese was found to be contaminated with E. coli O157:H7 104 days after production, despite having met regulated microbiological and aging requirements.
To our knowledge, this is the first confirmed outbreak of E. coli O157:H7 infection in Canada associated with raw milk hard cheese. A review of federal legislation vis-à-vis raw milk hard cheese may be in order.
PubMed ID
15913080 View in PubMed
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Antibiotic-Resistant Escherichia coli in Migratory Birds Inhabiting Remote Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297943
Source
Ecohealth. 2018 03; 15(1):72-81
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Date
03-2018
Author
Andrew M Ramey
Jorge Hernandez
Veronica Tyrlöv
Brian D Uher-Koch
Joel A Schmutz
Clara Atterby
Josef D Järhult
Jonas Bonnedahl
Author Affiliation
U.S. Geological Survey, Alaska Science Center, 4210 University Drive, Anchorage, AK, 99508, USA. aramey@usgs.gov.
Source
Ecohealth. 2018 03; 15(1):72-81
Date
03-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Animals
Charadriiformes - microbiology
Drug Resistance, Bacterial
Escherichia coli - isolation & purification
Abstract
We explored the abundance of antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli among migratory birds at remote sites in Alaska and used a comparative approach to speculate on plausible explanations for differences in detection among species. At a remote island site, we detected antibiotic-resistant E. coli phenotypes in samples collected from glaucous-winged gulls (Larus glaucescens), a species often associated with foraging at landfills, but not in samples collected from black-legged kittiwakes (Rissa tridactyla), a more pelagic gull that typically inhabits remote areas year-round. We did not find evidence for antibiotic-resistant E. coli among 347 samples collected primarily from waterfowl at a second remote site in western Alaska. Our results provide evidence that glaucous-winged gulls may be more likely to be infected with antibiotic-resistant E. coli at remote breeding sites as compared to sympatric black-legged kittiwakes. This could be a function of the tendency of glaucous-winged gulls to forage at landfills where antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections may be acquired and subsequently dispersed. The low overall detection of antibiotic-resistant E. coli in migratory birds sampled at remote sites in Alaska is consistent with the premise that anthropogenic inputs into the local environment or the relative lack thereof influences the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria among birds inhabiting the area.
PubMed ID
29230612 View in PubMed
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Associations of age and sex with the clinical outcome and incubation period of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O104:H4 infections, 2011.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108116
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2013 Sep 15;178(6):984-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-15-2013
Author
Dirk Werber
Lisa A King
Luise Müller
Per Follin
Udo Buchholz
Helen Bernard
Bettina Rosner
Steen Ethelberg
Henriette de Valk
Michael Höhle
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2013 Sep 15;178(6):984-92
Date
Sep-15-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diarrhea - epidemiology - microbiology
Disease Outbreaks
Escherichia coli Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Female
France - epidemiology
Germany - epidemiology
Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome - epidemiology - microbiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Sex Distribution
Shiga-Toxigenic Escherichia coli - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
We pooled data on adults who reported diarrhea or developed life-threatening hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) in any of 6 closed cohorts from 4 countries (1 cohort each in Denmark, France, and Sweden and 3 in Germany) that were investigated during a large outbreak of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O104:H4 infection in 2011. Logistic regression and Weibull regression for interval censored data were used to assess the relation of age and sex with clinical outcome and with incubation period. Information on the latter was used in a nonparametric back-projection context to estimate when adult cases reported in Germany were exposed to STEC O104:H4. Overall, data from 119 persons (median age, 49 years; 80 women) were analyzed. Bloody diarrhea and HUS were recorded as the most severe outcome for 44 and 26 individuals, respectively. Older age was significantly associated with bloody diarrhea but not with HUS. Woman had nonsignificantly higher odds for bloody diarrhea (odds ratio = 1.81) and developing HUS (odds ratio = 1.83) than did men. Older participants had a statistically significantly reduced incubation period. The shortest interval that included 75% of exposures in adults spanned only 12 days and preceded outbreak detection. In conclusion, the frequency of bloody diarrhea but not of HUS and the length of the incubation period depended on the age of individuals infected with STEC O104:H4. A large number of people were exposed to STEC O104:H4 for a short period of time.
PubMed ID
23935124 View in PubMed
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Asymptomatic bacteriuria in a population of elderly residents living in a community setting: prevalence, characteristics and associated factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82523
Source
Fam Pract. 2006 Jun;23(3):303-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2006
Author
Rodhe Nils
Mölstad Sigvard
Englund Lars
Svärdsudd Kurt
Author Affiliation
Centre for Clinical Research, Dalarna, Sweden. nils.rodhe@ltdalarna.se
Source
Fam Pract. 2006 Jun;23(3):303-7
Date
Jun-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged, 80 and over
Bacteriuria - epidemiology - urine
Cross-Sectional Studies
Escherichia coli - isolation & purification
Female
Health status
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis
Prevalence
Residence Characteristics
Sweden - epidemiology
Urinary Tract Infections - epidemiology - urine
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) is common among the elderly in institutional care, but less is known about its prevalence among the elderly living in community settings. Knowledge of the prevalence of ASB in this population could contribute to a reduction in unnecessary use of antibiotics. OBJECTIVE: To study the prevalence of ASB and associated health and social factors in a population of elderly people, aged 80 and over, in a community setting. DESIGN: A cross-sectional study. SETTING: The catchment area of a primary health care centre in a Swedish middle-sized town. METHOD: All residents, aged 80 and over, except for those in institutional living, were invited. A structured interview was carried out and urinary culture obtained. RESULTS: ASB was found in 14.8% of the participants, in 19.0% of the women and 5.8% of the men. In women independent associations with ASB were found for urinary incontinence (OR: 2.99, CI: 1.60-5.60), reduced mobility (OR: 2.68, CI: 1.42-5.03) and oestrogen treatment (OR: 2.20, CI: 1.09-4.45). CONCLUSION: Bacteriuria is common among the elderly living in non-institutional community settings, especially among women, although not as common as among the elderly in institutional settings. A woman over 80, with urinary incontinence, and needing support to walk has a risk of nearly 50% of presenting with ASB, a condition about which there is consensus not to treat with antibiotics. This should be borne in mind when examining patients with diffuse symptomatology and an accidental finding of bacteriuria.
PubMed ID
16595541 View in PubMed
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[Asymptomatic bacteriuria in women appearing for health examination]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature74812
Source
Lakartidningen. 1969 Apr 16;66(16):1669-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-16-1969

149 records – page 1 of 15.