Skip header and navigation

Refine By

151 records – page 1 of 16.

Adherence of Escherichia coli to human urinary tract epithelial cells.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature247164
Source
Infect Immun. 1979 Jun;24(3):753-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1979
Author
A J Schaeffer
S K Amundsen
L N Schmidt
Source
Infect Immun. 1979 Jun;24(3):753-9
Date
Jun-1979
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Culture Media
Epithelial Cells
Escherichia coli - drug effects - physiology
Female
Humans
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Mannose - pharmacology
Menstruation
Species Specificity
Temperature
Urinary Tract - cytology - microbiology
Abstract
The adherence of Escherichia coli to human uroepithelial cells obtained from midstream urine specimens of healthy women was studied. Bacteria labeled with [(3)H]uridine were used, and unattached organisms were separated from the epithelial cells by vacuum filtration with 5-mum-pore-size Nucleopore membrane filters. These techniques allowed adherence to be measured in large numbers of epithelial cells and overcame the problem of distinguishing experimental bacteria from the indigenous organisms present on uroepithelial cells. Adherence was not appreciably affected by temperature. Adherence was maximal at pH 4 to 5 and at bacterial-to-epithelial-cell ratios of 5,000 or more. The latter observation suggested that there are a limited number of receptors on the epithelial cell surface, an idea which was supported by competition experiments. Adherence occurred within 1 min and then decreased gradually or quickly, depending on the type of bacterial growth medium, to a stationary level of adherence, approximately 50% of that observed initially. The ability of epithelial cells from a single individual to bind E. coli varied in a cyclical and repetitive pattern. Adherence tended to be higher during the early phase of the menstrual cycle and diminished shortly after the time of expected ovulation; adherence frequently correlated with the value obtained on the same day of the menstrual cycle during the preceding months. Adherence was markedly enhanced by bacterial incubation in broth for 72 h and inhibited by alpha-d-mannose. These results suggest that adherence is a complex phenomenon perhaps mediated in part by bacterial pili and mannose residues on uroepithelial cells.
Notes
Cites: J Exp Med. 1977 Nov 1;146(5):1182-9421933
Cites: Infect Immun. 1977 Dec;18(3):767-7422493
Cites: Lancet. 1976 Sep 4;1(7984):490-274461
Cites: Lancet. 1978 Sep 9;2(8089):540-379914
Cites: J Urol. 1975 Aug;114(2):261-3240038
Cites: J Urol. 1977 Apr;117(4):472-6321809
Cites: Nature. 1977 Feb 17;265(5595):623-5323718
Cites: J Urol. 1977 Jul;118(1 Pt 2):221-4327107
Cites: J Urol. 1978 Sep;120(3):315-8355660
Cites: Infect Immun. 1978 Jul;21(1):229-37361565
Cites: Infect Immun. 1978 Oct;22(1):247-54365746
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 1977 Nov;34(5):534-40563215
Cites: Acta Paediatr Scand. 1976 Jan;65(1):81-7766563
Cites: J Urol. 1975 Feb;113(2):214-7803573
Cites: Infect Immun. 1976 Jul;14(1):240-5985805
Cites: J Infect Dis. 1976 Nov;134(5):486-91033231
Cites: Trans N Y Acad Sci. 1965 Jun;27(8):1003-545318403
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 1977 Mar;33(3):556-6216345207
PubMed ID
38207 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adjustment of antibiotic treatment according to the results of blood cultures leads to decreased antibiotic use and costs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171349
Source
J Antimicrob Chemother. 2006 Feb;57(2):326-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
Dag Berild
Atefeh Mohseni
Lien My Diep
Mogens Jensenius
Signe Holta Ringertz
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, Aker University Hospital, N-0514 Oslo, Norway. dag.berild@medisin.uio.no
Source
J Antimicrob Chemother. 2006 Feb;57(2):326-30
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Bacterial Agents - administration & dosage - economics - therapeutic use
Bacteremia - blood - drug therapy - economics
Drug Costs
Escherichia coli - drug effects
Female
Gram-Negative Bacteria - drug effects
Gram-Positive Bacteria - drug effects
Guidelines as Topic
Hospitals, University - economics
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Retrospective Studies
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To avoid the use of unnecessary broad-spectrum antibiotics, empirical therapy of bacteraemia should be adjusted according to the results of blood cultures.
To investigate whether the results of blood cultures led to changes in antibiotic use and costs in a tertiary-care university hospital in Norway.
Medical records from all patients with positive blood cultures in 2001 were analysed retrospectively. Factors predisposing to infections, results of blood cultures, antibiotic use and outcome were recorded. The influence of blood culture results on antibiotic treatment and costs were analysed.
The antibiotic use in 226 episodes of bacteraemia in 214 patients was analysed. According to the guidelines empirical antibiotic treatment should be adjusted in 166 episodes. Antibiotic use was adjusted in 146 (88%) of these 166 episodes, which led to a narrowing of therapy in 118 (80%) episodes. Compared with empirical therapy there was a 22% reduction in the number of antibiotics. Adjustment of therapy was more often performed in Gram-negative bacteraemia and polymicrobial cultures than in Gram-positive bacteraemia. In bacteraemia caused by ampicillin-resistant Escherichia coli, ampicillin was mostly replaced by ciprofloxacin. The cost for 7 days adjusted therapy in 146 episodes was euro19,800 (23%) less than for 7 days of empirical therapy.
Adjustment of antibiotic therapy according to the results of blood cultures led to a reduction in the number of antibiotics and a narrowing of antibiotic therapy. The costs for antibiotics decreased.
PubMed ID
16387751 View in PubMed
Less detail

Ambler class A extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp. in Canadian hospitals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180913
Source
Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2004 Apr;48(4):1204-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2004
Author
Michael R Mulvey
Elizabeth Bryce
David Boyd
Marianna Ofner-Agostini
Sara Christianson
Andrew E Simor
Shirley Paton
Author Affiliation
Nosocomial Infections, National Microbiology Laboratory, Health Canada, Winnipeg, Manitoba. michael_mulvey@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2004 Apr;48(4):1204-14
Date
Apr-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Canada - epidemiology
Chromosome Mapping
Drug Resistance, Bacterial
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field
Escherichia coli - drug effects - enzymology
Escherichia coli Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Humans
Klebsiella - drug effects - enzymology
Klebsiella Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Molecular Sequence Data
Phenotype
Plasmids - genetics
Population Surveillance
Prospective Studies
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Transformation, Bacterial - genetics
beta-Lactamases - biosynthesis - genetics
Abstract
This report describes a study carried out to gain baseline information on the molecular characteristics of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp. in Canada. A total of 29,323 E. coli and 5,156 Klebsiella sp. isolates were screened at 12 participating sites. Of these, 505 clinically significant, nonrepeat isolates displaying reduced susceptibility to the NCCLS-recommended beta-lactams were submitted to a central laboratory over a 1-year period ending on 30 September 2000. A total of 116 isolates were confirmed to be ESBL producers. PCR and sequence analysis revealed the presence of TEM-11 (n = 1), TEM-12 (n = 1), TEM-29 (n = 1), TEM-52 (n = 4), CTX-M-13 (n = 1), CTX-M-14 (n = 15), CTX-M-15 (n = 11), SHV-2 (n = 2), SHV-2a (n = 12), SHV-5 (n = 6), SHV-12 (n = 45), and SHV-30 (n = 2). Five novel beta-lactamases were identified and designated TEM-115 (n = 2), TEM-120 (n = 1), SHV-40 (n = 2), SHV-41 (n = 4), and SHV-42 (n = 1). In addition, no molecular mechanism was identified for five isolates displaying an ESBL phenotype. Macrorestriction analysis of all ESBL isolates was conducted, as was restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of plasmids harboring ESBLs. Although a "clonal" distribution of isolates was observed at some individual sites, there was very little evidence suggesting intrahospital spread. In addition, examples of identical or closely related plasmids that were identified at geographically distinct sites across Canada are given. However, there was considerable diversity with respect to plasmid types observed.
Notes
Cites: Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2002 Feb;46(2):602-411796390
Cites: Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2002 Mar;46(3):630-711850241
Cites: Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2002 May;46(5):1481-9111959586
Cites: Can Commun Dis Rep. 2002 Jul 15;28(14):113-812132385
Cites: J Infect Dis. 2002 Sep 1;186(5):652-6012195352
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 2002 Oct 1;35(7):834-4112228820
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 2002 Nov;40(11):4030-612409370
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 2003 Jan;41(1):460-212517894
Cites: Int J Antimicrob Agents. 2000 Mar;14(2):137-4210720804
Cites: Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2000 Oct;44(10):2759-6310991857
Cites: Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2001 Jan;45(1):309-1111120985
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 2001 Apr 1;32(7):1085-911264037
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 2001 May 15;32 Suppl 2:S94-10311320450
Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 2001 May-Jun;7(3):382-911384513
Cites: CMAJ. 2001 Jul 10;165(1):21-611468949
Cites: FEMS Microbiol Lett. 2001 Jul 24;201(2):237-4111470367
Cites: Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2001 Sep;45(9):2407-1311502506
Cites: Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2001 Oct;45(10):2856-6111557480
Cites: Clin Microbiol Rev. 2001 Oct;14(4):933-51, table of contents11585791
Cites: Pharmacotherapy. 2001 Aug;21(8):920-811718498
Cites: Nucleic Acids Res. 1984 Apr 11;12(7):3219-346326054
Cites: Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 1989 Aug;33(8):1131-62679367
Cites: J Bacteriol. 1990 Jun;172(6):3229-362160941
Cites: J Infect Dis. 1990 Aug;162(2):460-52197339
Cites: Infection. 1990 Sep-Oct;18(5):294-82276823
Cites: Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 1994 Apr;38(4):761-68031043
Cites: FEMS Microbiol Lett. 1995 Dec 15;134(2-3):203-88586268
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 1995 Oct;21(4):915-238645840
Cites: Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 1996 May;15(5):398-4028793399
Cites: Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 1996 Feb;40(2):342-88834877
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 1996 Oct;23(4):779-848909844
Cites: Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 1998 Jan;42(1):108-139449269
Cites: Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 1998 Mar;42(3):596-6009517938
Cites: Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 1998 Apr;42(4):879-849559800
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1998 May;36(5):1446-99574728
Cites: Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis. 1998 Jun;31(2):389-959635914
Cites: J Infect. 1998 May;36(3):279-859661937
Cites: Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 1998 Dec;42(12):3328-910049240
Cites: FEMS Microbiol Lett. 1999 May 1;174(1):185-9010234838
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1999 Jun;37(6):1758-6310325320
PubMed ID
15047521 View in PubMed
Less detail

Analysis of 3789 in- and outpatient Escherichia coli isolates from across Canada--results of the CANWARD 2007-2009 study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136687
Source
Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis. 2011 Mar;69(3):314-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Philippe R S Lagacé-Wiens
Patricia J Simner
Kevin R Forward
Franil Tailor
Heather J Adam
Melanie Decorby
James Karlowsky
Daryl J Hoban
George G Zhanel
Author Affiliation
Department of Microbiology, St. Boniface General Hospital/Diagnostic Services of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada R2H 2A6. plagacewiens@sbgh.mb.ca
Source
Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis. 2011 Mar;69(3):314-9
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial - genetics
Escherichia coli - drug effects - genetics - isolation & purification
Escherichia coli Infections - drug therapy - microbiology
Female
Geography
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Inpatients
Male
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Middle Aged
Outpatients
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Urinary Tract Infections - drug therapy - microbiology
beta-Lactamases - metabolism
Abstract
Escherichia coli was the most commonly isolated pathogen in the Canadian Ward Surveillance Study 2007-2009 (3789 isolates). Susceptibility to cefazolin (34.1%), trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (73.8%), ciprofloxacin (78.4%), and levofloxacin (78.8%) was lowest. Susceptibility was above 90% for meropenem (100%), tigecycline (99.9%), piperacillin-tazobactam (97.6%), nitrofurantoin (96.9%), ceftazidime (95.6%), amoxicillin-clavulanate (94.9%), ceftriaxone (94.1%), cefoxitin (92.3%), and gentamicin (90.8%). Over the study period, there was a significant reduction in susceptibility to amoxicillin-clavulanate and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole for urinary tract isolates. Inpatient status was associated with greater resistance to nearly all antimicrobials including greater multidrug resistance (MDR). Increasing age was associated with resistance to fluoroquinolones, ceftriaxone, piperacillin-tazobactam, and MDR. Female gender was associated with susceptibility to fluoroquinolones and nitrofurantoin. In conclusion, greater antimicrobial resistance and MDR in E. coli were observed in inpatients, males, and with increasing age. The deterioration of susceptibility to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole continues with the greatest reduction in urinary isolates. Significant regional differences in resistance rates were apparent.
PubMed ID
21353959 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Analysis of plasmid profile of antibiotic-resistant Enterobacteriaceae circulating in hospitals].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229366
Source
Antibiot Khimioter. 1990 Apr;35(4):28-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1990
Author
A M Dombrovskii
Source
Antibiot Khimioter. 1990 Apr;35(4):28-32
Date
Apr-1990
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Child
Cross Infection - microbiology
Drug Resistance, Microbial
Escherichia coli - drug effects - genetics
Escherichia coli Infections - microbiology
Genotype
Humans
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Moscow
Plasmids - drug effects
R Factors - drug effects - genetics
Salmonella Infections - microbiology
Salmonella typhimurium - drug effects - genetics
Abstract
Certain pheno- and genotype properties of S. typhimurium and some other representatives of Enterobacteriaceae resistant to antimicrobial drugs were studied. The strains were isolated from children with salmonellosis within 4 months when an infection hospital was subjected to microbiological observation. It was shown that by their antibiotic resistance, phagovars and molecular weights of the plasmid DNas, the strains S. typhimurium were similar to those isolated during hospital infections. The conjugative plasmids responsible for antibiotic resistance in some strains did not differ in their molecular weights and antibiotic resistance markers. The strains S. typhimurium similar in their pheno- and genotype properties were isolated only from 2 patients which allowed one to consider it possible that the patients were infected by the strains of common genesis. Analysis of nonpathogenic representatives of Enterobacteriaceae isolated from the patients along with the S. typhimurium strains confirmed the fact that the patients were infected with the same pathogenic strain.
PubMed ID
2200370 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antibacterial and antifungal properties of propylene glycol, hexylene glycol, and 1,3-butylene glycol in vitro.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12105
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 1991;71(2):148-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
T. Kinnunen
M. Koskela
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 1991;71(2):148-50
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Antifungal Agents
Bacteria - drug effects - growth & development
Butylene Glycols - pharmacology
Candida albicans - drug effects - growth & development
Escherichia coli - drug effects
Glycols - pharmacology
Propylene Glycol
Propylene Glycols - pharmacology
Staphylococcus aureus - drug effects
Staphylococcus epidermidis - drug effects
Streptococcus - drug effects
Streptococcus pyogenes - drug effects
Abstract
The antimicrobial properties of three glycols, - propylene glycol, hexylene glycol, and 1,3-butylene glycol - against Candida albicans, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus pyogenes A, Streptococcus mitis, and E. coli were studied in vitro. Within 20 h, 10% and 30% hexylene glycol in fresh tryptic soy broth were able to kill all the micro-organisms listed above. Five percent hexylene glycol showed some antimicrobial properties but the 1% agent had no effect. Thirty percent 1,3-butylene glycol and 30% propylene glycol were approximately as effective as 10% HG. The results speak in favour of using hexylene glycol in cosmetic and dermatological vehicles instead of propylene glycol and 1,3-butylene glycol.
PubMed ID
1675525 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antibacterial Susceptibilities of Escherichia coli from Community-Acquired Urinary Tract Infections in the Faroe Islands, Associations with Antibacterial Sales, and Comparison with Iceland and Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294350
Source
Microb Drug Resist. 2018 Jan/Feb; 24(1):40-47
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Author
Marita Debess Magnussen
Hannes Gislason
Shahin Gaini
Karl G Kristinsson
Author Affiliation
1 Thetis, Food and Environmental Laboratory, Tórshavn , Faroe Islands .
Source
Microb Drug Resist. 2018 Jan/Feb; 24(1):40-47
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Ampicillin - economics - therapeutic use
Anti-Bacterial Agents - economics - therapeutic use
Commerce - statistics & numerical data
Community-Acquired Infections
Denmark - epidemiology
Disk Diffusion Antimicrobial Tests
Drug Resistance, Bacterial
Escherichia coli - drug effects - growth & development
Escherichia coli Infections - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Logistic Models
Sulfamethoxazole - economics - therapeutic use
Trimethoprim - economics - therapeutic use
Trimethoprim, Sulfamethoxazole Drug Combination - economics - therapeutic use
Urinary Tract Infections - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology
Abstract
Currently, data on Escherichia coli antibacterial susceptibilities in the Faroe Islands are lacking. The aim was to investigate the antibacterial susceptibilities of E. coli from patients with community-acquired urinary tract infections in the Faroe Islands, correlate with antibacterial sales, and compare with Iceland and Denmark. From 2009 to 2010 and in 2012, 12 general practitioners from the Faroe Islands were recruited to provide urine samples from patients. Antibacterial susceptibilities were determined by disc diffusion testing according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute methods and criteria. Logistic regression (quasibinomial) of the antibacterial resistance proportions versus mean sales during the period of 2008-2011 was used to determine association. Nonsusceptibility to at least 1 of the 14 antibacterial drugs investigated was found in 54% of the E. coli isolates and was most common to ampicillin (46%), followed by sulfamethoxazole (39%), trimethoprim (27%), trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (27%), and
PubMed ID
28537778 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Antibiotic resistance and transferable antibiotic resistance of Escherichia coli isolated from Swedish calves 5 and 30 days old.]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13285
Source
Nord Vet Med. 1975 Feb;27(2):77-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1975
Author
M. Wierup
Source
Nord Vet Med. 1975 Feb;27(2):77-84
Date
Feb-1975
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Ampicillin - pharmacology
Animals
Cattle
Chloramphenicol - pharmacology
Escherichia coli - drug effects - isolation & purification
Extrachromosomal Inheritance
Feces - microbiology
Neomycin - pharmacology
Penicillin resistance
Streptomycin - pharmacology
Sulfonamides - pharmacology
Sweden
Tetracycline - pharmacology
Abstract
E. coli strains isolated from 5-day-old and 30-day-old healthy calves were tested for antibiotic resistance and H-factor mediated antibiotic resistance. An average of 1.6 antibiotic-resistant strains and 1.1 strains with transferable antibiotic resistance were isolated from each of the investigated calves. In comparison with the 30-day-old calves, the 5-day-old calves had significantly more strains with transferable antibiotic resistance (95.8 percent as against 63.4 percent). The R+ strains isolated from the younger calves transferred significantly more en bloc (43.5 percent as against 10.0 percent) and double plus multiple resistance (5292 percent as against 24.4 percent) than did those isolated from the older calves. The most common resistance was to sulphonamide and tetracycline and the most common transferred resistance was to sulphonamide.
PubMed ID
1094406 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antibiotic resistance in isolates recovered from women with community-acquired urinary tract infections presenting to a tertiary care emergency department.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120800
Source
CJEM. 2012 Sep;14(5):295-305
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Lyne Filiatrault
Rachel M McKay
David M Patrick
Diane L Roscoe
Grahame Quan
Jeff Brubacher
Ken M Collins
Author Affiliation
Department of Emergency Medicine, School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. filiatra@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
CJEM. 2012 Sep;14(5):295-305
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
British Columbia - epidemiology
Community-Acquired Infections - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology
Drug Resistance, Microbial
Emergency Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Escherichia coli - drug effects - isolation & purification
Escherichia coli Infections - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Tertiary Care Centers - statistics & numerical data
Urinary Tract Infections - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology
Young Adult
Abstract
We sought to determine the antibiotic susceptibility of organisms causing community-acquired urinary tract infections (UTIs) in adult females attending an urban emergency department (ED) and to identify risk factors for antibiotic resistance.
We reviewed the ED charts of all nonpregnant, nonlactating adult females with positive urine cultures for 2008 and recorded demographics, diagnosis, complicating factors, organism susceptibility, and risk factors for antibiotic resistance. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for potential risk factors were calculated.
Our final sample comprised 327 UTIs: 218 were cystitis, of which 22 were complicated cases and 109 were pyelonephritis, including 22 complicated cases. Escherichia coli accounted for 82.3% of all UTIs, whereas Staphylococcus saprophyticus accounted for 5.2%. In uncomplicated cystitis, 9.5% of all isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin and 24.0% to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX). In uncomplicated pyelonephritis, 19.5% of isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin and 36.8% to TMP-SMX. In UTI (all types combined), any antibiotic use within the previous 3 months was a significant risk factor for resistance to both ciprofloxacin (OR 3.34, 95% CI 1.16-9.62) and TMP-SMX (OR 4.02, 95% CI 1.48-10.92). Being 65 years of age or older and having had a history of UTI in the previous year were risk factors only for ciprofloxacin resistance.
E. coli was the predominant urinary pathogen in this series. Resistance to ciprofloxacin and TMP-SMX was high, highlighting the importance of relevant, local antibiograms. Any recent antibiotic use was a risk factor for both ciprofloxacin and TMP-SMX resistance in UTI. Our findings should be confirmed with a larger prospective study.
PubMed ID
22967697 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antibiotic resistance patterns among blood culture isolates in a Danish county 1981-1995.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203319
Source
J Med Microbiol. 1999 Jan;48(1):67-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1999
Author
B. Kristensen
H H Smedegaard
H M Pedersen
M F Andersen
J F Dahlerup
H T Sørensen
B. Korsager
H C Schønheyder
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Microbiology, Aalborg Hospital, Denmark.
Source
J Med Microbiol. 1999 Jan;48(1):67-71
Date
Jan-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aminoglycosides
Ampicillin - therapeutic use
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Bacteremia - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Drug Resistance, Microbial
Drug Resistance, Multiple
Drug Therapy, Combination - therapeutic use
Escherichia coli - drug effects - isolation & purification
Gram-Negative Bacteria - drug effects - isolation & purification
Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections - drug therapy - microbiology
Gram-Positive Bacteria - drug effects - isolation & purification
Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections - drug therapy - microbiology
Humans
Penicillin G - therapeutic use
Abstract
All episodes of bacteraemia during a 15-year period (1981-1995) in the County of Northern Jutland, Denmark, were analysed with regard to antibiotic resistance. A total of 8840 isolates from 7938 episodes of bacteraemia was identified. Over time, no changes in bacterial aetiology were noted. Three isolates of Staphylococcus aureus were methicillin resistant (0.2%) and six were gentamicin resistant (0.4%). Among coagulase-negative staphylococci a 14% increase in resistance to penicillin was observed (95% confidence intervals, CI: 2-26%). Likewise, the frequency of resistance to methicillin, gentamicin and erythromycin increased, the corresponding figures being 38% (CI: 26-50%), 26% (CI: 14-38%) and 32% (CI: 16-50%), respectively, whereas a 14% decrease in resistance to streptomycin was recorded (CI: 4-24%). A 20% (CI: 2-37%) increase of coagulase-negative staphylococci resistant to three or more antibiotics was observed. The frequency of ampicillin resistance increased by 9% among Escherichia coli (CI: 4-13%) and by 10% (CI: 6-14%) in all Enterobacteriaceae. Among Enterobacteriaceae the level of resistance to third-generation cephalosporins, carbapenems, aminoglycosides and fluoroquinolones remained low (
PubMed ID
9920127 View in PubMed
Less detail

151 records – page 1 of 16.