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Association of atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) with prolonged diarrhoea.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30074
Source
J Med Microbiol. 2004 Nov;53(Pt 11):1137-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2004
Author
Jan E Afset
Lars Bevanger
PÃ¥l Romundstad
KÃ¥re Bergh
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Medical Microbiology, St. Olavs Hospital, University Hospital, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Children's and Women's Health, Trondheim, Norway. jan.afset@stolav.no
Source
J Med Microbiol. 2004 Nov;53(Pt 11):1137-44
Date
Nov-2004
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adhesins, Bacterial - genetics
Antigens, Bacterial - analysis
Antigens, Surface - analysis
Case-Control Studies
Child, Preschool
Diarrhea - epidemiology - microbiology
Escherichia coli - classification - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Escherichia coli Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Escherichia coli Proteins - genetics
Female
Fimbriae Proteins - genetics
Genes, Bacterial
Humans
Infant
Male
Norway
O Antigens - analysis
Serotyping
Shiga Toxins - genetics
Abstract
The aim of the present case control study was to investigate the prevalence of atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) and its possible role in causing diarrhoea among children or = 14 days had atypical EPEC. The association between atypical EPEC and prolonged diarrhoea (OR = 2.1, P = 0.04) was caused by a high prevalence among female patients (40.6 %). In conclusion, atypical EPEC was found to be slightly more prevalent in patients than controls, without any overall significant association with diarrhoea. However, a significant association was observed with diarrhoea lasting 14 days or more, a finding that may indicate a role for atypical EPEC in prolonged disease.
PubMed ID
15496393 View in PubMed
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Bacterial virulence in urinary tract infection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature60098
Source
Infect Dis Clin North Am. 1987 Dec;1(4):731-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1987
Author
C. Svanborg Edén
P. de Man
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Immunology, University of Götenborg, Sweden.
Source
Infect Dis Clin North Am. 1987 Dec;1(4):731-50
Date
Dec-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bacterial Adhesion
Bacterial Typing Techniques
Escherichia coli - classification - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Escherichia coli Infections - microbiology
Female
Glycolipids - metabolism
Humans
Hydroxamic Acids - metabolism
Infant
Lipopolysaccharides - metabolism
Male
Polysaccharides, Bacterial - metabolism
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Urinary Tract Infections - microbiology
Virulence
Abstract
The severity of an infection is a function of the resistance of the host and the virulence of the infecting strain. Infections of the urinary tract can be caused by a wide range of gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, which also are constituents of the normal flora. Indeed, most uropathogens originate from the intestinal tract. Still, the virulence concept implies that bacteria associated with urinary tract infections differ from members of the indigenous flora not causing infections. This review attempts to summarize the mechanisms known to contribute to bacterial virulence in the urinary tract and their relevance in different patient groups.
PubMed ID
3333656 View in PubMed
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[Biological characteristics of enteropathogenic Escherichia of the serological group O-144:K, isolated in Moscow].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234305
Source
Lab Delo. 1988;(9):59-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988

Cluster of multiresistant Escherichia coli O78:H10 in Greater Copenhagen.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59427
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1994;26(4):406-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
B. Olesen
H J Kolmos
F. Orskov
I. Orskov
Author Affiliation
International Escherichia and Klebsiella Centre (WHO), Statens Seruminstitut, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1994;26(4):406-10
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cluster analysis
Community-Acquired Infections
Denmark - epidemiology
Drug Resistance, Microbial
Drug Resistance, Multiple
Escherichia coli - classification - isolation & purification
Escherichia coli Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Middle Aged
Serotyping
Urinary Tract Infections - microbiology
Abstract
A multiresistant, lactose-negative Escherichia coli O78:H10 was isolated from 19 patients in Greater Copenhagen over a period of 8 months. At least 14 cases were community-acquired. 18 isolates originated from urine cultures and 1 from a faecal sample. 13 patients were predisposed to urinary tract infection (UTI) and 11 patients showed clinical signs of UTI. This is the first report of E. coli O78:H10 causing human disease. The cluster was probably food-borne, but the source was not identified. This cluster of identical disease associated E. coli was only uncovered because of its multiresistance and lactose-negative phenotype.
PubMed ID
7984972 View in PubMed
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High prevalence of atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) in Norwegian children with diarrhoea.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30695
Source
J Med Microbiol. 2003 Nov;52(Pt 11):1015-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2003
Author
Jan E Afset
KÃ¥re Bergh
Lars Bevanger
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Medical Microbiology, St Olav's Hospital, University Hospital, N-7006 Trondheim, Norway. jan.afset@stolav.no
Source
J Med Microbiol. 2003 Nov;52(Pt 11):1015-9
Date
Nov-2003
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Diarrhea, Infantile - microbiology
Escherichia coli - classification - isolation & purification
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Norway
Serotyping
Time Factors
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to investigate the relative contribution of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) as a cause of infectious diarrhoea in Norwegian children. Data from faecal specimens from children
PubMed ID
14532347 View in PubMed
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Markers of virulence among prospectively acquired putative enteropathogenic Escherichia coli serogroups.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209196
Source
Pediatr Pathol Lab Med. 1997 Mar-Apr;17(2):267-74
Publication Type
Article
Author
N. Cimolai
A C Cheong
C. Trombley
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
Pediatr Pathol Lab Med. 1997 Mar-Apr;17(2):267-74
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bacterial Adhesion - genetics
British Columbia - epidemiology
Child, Preschool
Escherichia coli - classification - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Escherichia coli Infections - epidemiology - genetics - microbiology
Feces - microbiology
Female
Gastroenteritis - epidemiology - genetics - microbiology
Gene Frequency
Genes, Bacterial
Genetic markers
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Prospective Studies
Serotyping
Virulence
Abstract
We assessed the frequency of proposed enteropathogenic virulence factor genes (eaeA and eaf) by genetic amplification for a series of prospectively collected putative enteropathogenic Escherichia coli serogroup isolates that were acquired from the stool specimens of children. Among 102 isolates, eaeA and eaf markers were determined among 27.5% and 4.9%, respectively. Eaf positivity was found to be coexisting in only a minority of eaeA+ E. coli; the eaeA+/eaf- genotype was most common among strains that had evidence of at least one virulence marker. When clinical variables were compared for two groups of patients whose strains did or did not possess eaeA, the eaeA+ group was more likely to have had an acute diarrheal illness (P = .05) and less likely to have had an underlying chronic illness (P = .03). Localized adherence in vitro was easily recognized for eaeA+/eaf+ E. coli but eaeA+/eaf- isolates were less consistent in manifesting this phenotype. The availability of genetic amplification technologies has the potential to rekindle diagnostic interests in this area, although a rational approach has yet to be defined.
PubMed ID
9086533 View in PubMed
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The species accuracy of the Most Probable Number (MPN) European Union reference method for enumeration of Escherichia coli in marine bivalves.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285865
Source
J Microbiol Methods. 2016 Dec;131:73-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2016
Author
Didrik Hjertaker Grevskott
Cecilie Smith Svanevik
Astrid Louise Wester
Bjørn Tore Lunestad
Source
J Microbiol Methods. 2016 Dec;131:73-77
Date
Dec-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acinetobacter baumannii - isolation & purification
Animals
Bacteria - classification - isolation & purification
Bacterial Typing Techniques - methods
Bivalvia - microbiology
Citrobacter - isolation & purification
Escherichia coli - classification - isolation & purification
European Union
Food Safety - methods
Humans
Klebsiella oxytoca - isolation & purification
Klebsiella pneumoniae - isolation & purification
Norway
Seafood - microbiology
Sensitivity and specificity
Species Specificity
Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization - methods
Abstract
Continuous European Union programmes with specified methods for enumeration of Escherichia coli in bivalves for human consumption are currently running. The objective of this research was to examine the species accuracy of the five times three tube Most Probable Number (MPN) EU reference method used for detection of E. coli in marine bivalves. Among 549 samples of bivalves harvested from Norwegian localities during 2014 and 2015, a total number of 200 bacterial isolates were prepared from randomly selected culture-positive bivalves. These presumptive E. coli isolates were characterized biochemically by the Analytical Profile Index (API) 20E, as well as by Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). The majority of isolates (90%) were identified as E. coli, by both API 20E and MALDI-TOF MS. Ten isolates (5%) were identified as Klebsiella pneumoniae, while one isolate was identified as K. oxytoca by both methods, whereas three isolates were identified as Acinetobacter baumannii, Citrobacter braakii, and Enterobacter cloacae, respectively. The identification of the remaining six isolates were not in compliance between the two methods.
PubMed ID
27746195 View in PubMed
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Verotoxin-producing Escherichia coli in ground beef in Manitoba.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228370
Source
CMAJ. 1990 Sep 15;143(6):519-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-15-1990
Source
CMAJ. 1990 Sep 15;143(6):519-21
Date
Sep-15-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cattle
Colitis, Ulcerative - microbiology
Endotoxins - analysis
Escherichia coli - classification - isolation & purification
Escherichia coli Infections
Food Microbiology
Humans
Manitoba
Meat
Pilot Projects
Serotyping
Notes
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Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 1987 Oct;53(10):2394-63322190
Cites: J Infect Dis. 1988 May;157(5):1054-73283256
Cites: Microb Pathog. 1988 Feb;4(2):103-132849027
Cites: J Infect Dis. 1986 Oct;154(4):631-83528316
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1987 Dec 10;317(24):1496-5003317047
Cites: Infect Immun. 1977 Dec;18(3):775-9338490
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1983 Mar 24;308(12):681-56338386
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1985 Oct;22(4):614-93908473
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 1988 Oct;54(10):2536-403060018
PubMed ID
2207907 View in PubMed
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9 records – page 1 of 1.