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50 Years Ago in The Journal of Pediatrics: Enteric Disease Due to Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli in Hospitalized Infants in Kotzebue, Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260001
Source
J Pediatr. 2015 Feb;166(2):268
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2015

[Action of natural gamma-interferons on functional activity of phagocytes and antibody synthesis after vaccination]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57493
Source
Mikrobiol Z. 2000 Nov-Dec;62(6):26-32
Publication Type
Article
Author
Ia G Kishko
M I Vasylenko
Author Affiliation
Institute of Microbiology and Virology, Ukrainian National Academy of Sciences, 154 Zabolotny St., Kyiv, 03143, Ukraine.
Source
Mikrobiol Z. 2000 Nov-Dec;62(6):26-32
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Newborn
Antibodies, Bacterial - biosynthesis
Bacterial Vaccines - immunology
Cattle
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Escherichia coli - immunology
Female
Interferon Type II - immunology - pharmacology
Phagocytes - drug effects - immunology - physiology
Swine - immunology
Vaccination
Abstract
Natural swine and cattle gamma-IFNs were prepared for trials. One dose of gamma-suiferon contained 1000 IU, that of gamma-boviferon--2000 IU. Three series of researches were carried out to estimate the in vitro and in vivo absorbing activity of phagocytes (monocytes and neutrophiles), their bactericidal ability (on new born pigs and calves, 2 months old animals, sows and cows with calf) and antibodygenesis after immunization of animals by colibacteriosis vaccine. It has been shown in trials that gamma-IFN increased to significant degree (several times, as a rule) the absorbing activity of phagocytes (especially that of monocytes in new-born animals). At the same time bactericidal activity of phagocytes sharply increased--their functional reserve in experimental animals was significantly higher (2-3-times), than in control. Immunization by colinebacteriosis vaccine with additional treatment by homologous gamma-IFN 3-4 times increased antibodygenesis in comparison with control.
PubMed ID
11247346 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adherence of Escherichia coli to human urinary tract epithelial cells.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature247164
Source
Infect Immun. 1979 Jun;24(3):753-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1979
Author
A J Schaeffer
S K Amundsen
L N Schmidt
Source
Infect Immun. 1979 Jun;24(3):753-9
Date
Jun-1979
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Culture Media
Epithelial Cells
Escherichia coli - drug effects - physiology
Female
Humans
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Mannose - pharmacology
Menstruation
Species Specificity
Temperature
Urinary Tract - cytology - microbiology
Abstract
The adherence of Escherichia coli to human uroepithelial cells obtained from midstream urine specimens of healthy women was studied. Bacteria labeled with [(3)H]uridine were used, and unattached organisms were separated from the epithelial cells by vacuum filtration with 5-mum-pore-size Nucleopore membrane filters. These techniques allowed adherence to be measured in large numbers of epithelial cells and overcame the problem of distinguishing experimental bacteria from the indigenous organisms present on uroepithelial cells. Adherence was not appreciably affected by temperature. Adherence was maximal at pH 4 to 5 and at bacterial-to-epithelial-cell ratios of 5,000 or more. The latter observation suggested that there are a limited number of receptors on the epithelial cell surface, an idea which was supported by competition experiments. Adherence occurred within 1 min and then decreased gradually or quickly, depending on the type of bacterial growth medium, to a stationary level of adherence, approximately 50% of that observed initially. The ability of epithelial cells from a single individual to bind E. coli varied in a cyclical and repetitive pattern. Adherence tended to be higher during the early phase of the menstrual cycle and diminished shortly after the time of expected ovulation; adherence frequently correlated with the value obtained on the same day of the menstrual cycle during the preceding months. Adherence was markedly enhanced by bacterial incubation in broth for 72 h and inhibited by alpha-d-mannose. These results suggest that adherence is a complex phenomenon perhaps mediated in part by bacterial pili and mannose residues on uroepithelial cells.
Notes
Cites: J Exp Med. 1977 Nov 1;146(5):1182-9421933
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Cites: J Urol. 1975 Feb;113(2):214-7803573
Cites: Infect Immun. 1976 Jul;14(1):240-5985805
Cites: J Infect Dis. 1976 Nov;134(5):486-91033231
Cites: Trans N Y Acad Sci. 1965 Jun;27(8):1003-545318403
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 1977 Mar;33(3):556-6216345207
PubMed ID
38207 View in PubMed
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Adjustment of antibiotic treatment according to the results of blood cultures leads to decreased antibiotic use and costs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171349
Source
J Antimicrob Chemother. 2006 Feb;57(2):326-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
Dag Berild
Atefeh Mohseni
Lien My Diep
Mogens Jensenius
Signe Holta Ringertz
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, Aker University Hospital, N-0514 Oslo, Norway. dag.berild@medisin.uio.no
Source
J Antimicrob Chemother. 2006 Feb;57(2):326-30
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Bacterial Agents - administration & dosage - economics - therapeutic use
Bacteremia - blood - drug therapy - economics
Drug Costs
Escherichia coli - drug effects
Female
Gram-Negative Bacteria - drug effects
Gram-Positive Bacteria - drug effects
Guidelines as Topic
Hospitals, University - economics
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Retrospective Studies
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To avoid the use of unnecessary broad-spectrum antibiotics, empirical therapy of bacteraemia should be adjusted according to the results of blood cultures.
To investigate whether the results of blood cultures led to changes in antibiotic use and costs in a tertiary-care university hospital in Norway.
Medical records from all patients with positive blood cultures in 2001 were analysed retrospectively. Factors predisposing to infections, results of blood cultures, antibiotic use and outcome were recorded. The influence of blood culture results on antibiotic treatment and costs were analysed.
The antibiotic use in 226 episodes of bacteraemia in 214 patients was analysed. According to the guidelines empirical antibiotic treatment should be adjusted in 166 episodes. Antibiotic use was adjusted in 146 (88%) of these 166 episodes, which led to a narrowing of therapy in 118 (80%) episodes. Compared with empirical therapy there was a 22% reduction in the number of antibiotics. Adjustment of therapy was more often performed in Gram-negative bacteraemia and polymicrobial cultures than in Gram-positive bacteraemia. In bacteraemia caused by ampicillin-resistant Escherichia coli, ampicillin was mostly replaced by ciprofloxacin. The cost for 7 days adjusted therapy in 146 episodes was euro19,800 (23%) less than for 7 days of empirical therapy.
Adjustment of antibiotic therapy according to the results of blood cultures led to a reduction in the number of antibiotics and a narrowing of antibiotic therapy. The costs for antibiotics decreased.
PubMed ID
16387751 View in PubMed
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The advantage of mucosal immunization for polysaccharide-specific memory responses in early life.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57382
Source
Eur J Immunol. 2005 Apr;35(4):1037-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2005
Author
Stefania P Bjarnarson
Håvard Jakobsen
Giuseppe Del Giudice
Emanuelle Trannoy
Claire-Anne Siegrist
Ingileif Jonsdottir
Author Affiliation
Department of Immunology, Landspitali-University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland.
Source
Eur J Immunol. 2005 Apr;35(4):1037-45
Date
Apr-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Bacterial Toxins - immunology
Enterotoxins - immunology
Escherichia coli Proteins - immunology
Immunity, Mucosal - immunology
Immunologic Memory - immunology
Mice
Polysaccharides, Bacterial - immunology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Vaccines - immunology
Abstract
The aim of vaccination is to rapidly elicit protective immunity and generate memory for sustained protection. We studied the induction and persistence of polysaccharide (PS)-specific memory in neonatal and infant mice primed with pneumococcal conjugate (Pnc1-TT) by assessing the response to native pneumococcal PS (PPS-1), the kinetics of the PPS-1-specific IgG response to a second Pnc1-TT dose and affinity maturation. A subcutaneous (s.c.) Pnc1-TT booster induced a rapid increase in PPS-1-specific IgG, indicating efficient priming for memory by a single dose of Pnc1-TT already at 1 week of age. High levels were maintained for >12 weeks. However, a PPS-1 booster induced no response in neonatal or infant mice. The adjuvant LT-K63 significantly enhanced the IgG response and affinity to Pnc1-TT by both the s.c. and the intranasal (i.n.) route in all age groups. In neonatal and infant mice, PPS-1 and LT-K63 induced a booster response only when given i.n. following either s.c. or i.n. priming with Pnc1-TT and LT-K63. In contrast, PPS-1 with or without LT-K63 administered s.c. compromised the ongoing PPS-1-specific response elicited in neonatal mice by either s.c. or i.n. priming with Pnc1-TT and LT-K63. These results demonstrate the advantage of the mucosal route for elicitation of PS-specific memory responses in early life.
PubMed ID
15756644 View in PubMed
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Aerobic growth at nanomolar oxygen concentrations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100200
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2010 Nov 2;107(44):18755-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2-2010
Author
Daniel A Stolper
Niels Peter Revsbech
Donald E Canfield
Author Affiliation
Nordic Center for Earth Evolution and Institute of Biology, University of Southern Denmark, Campusvej 55, 5230 Odense M, Denmark.
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2010 Nov 2;107(44):18755-60
Date
Nov-2-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aerobiosis - physiology
Escherichia coli K12 - physiology
Models, Biological
Oxygen - metabolism
Abstract
Molecular oxygen (O(2)) is the second most abundant gas in the Earth's atmosphere, but in many natural environments, its concentration is reduced to low or even undetectable levels. Although low-oxygen-adapted organisms define the ecology of low-oxygen environments, their capabilities are not fully known. These capabilities also provide a framework for reconstructing a critical period in the history of life, because low, but not negligible, atmospheric oxygen levels could have persisted before the "Great Oxidation" of the Earth's surface about 2.3 to 2.4 billion years ago. Here, we show that Escherichia coli K-12, chosen for its well-understood biochemistry, rapid growth rate, and low-oxygen-affinity terminal oxidase, grows at oxygen levels of = 3 nM, two to three orders of magnitude lower than previously observed for aerobes. Our study expands both the environmental range and temporal history of aerobic organisms.
PubMed ID
20974919 View in PubMed
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Agricultural, socioeconomic and environmental variables as risks for human verotoxigenic Escherichia coli (VTEC) infection in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130372
Source
BMC Infect Dis. 2011;11:275
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Katri Jalava
Jukka Ollgren
Marjut Eklund
Anja Siitonen
Markku Kuusi
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Disease Surveillance and Control, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. katri.jalava@thl.fi
Source
BMC Infect Dis. 2011;11:275
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field
Environmental Exposure
Escherichia coli Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Molecular Typing
Risk factors
Shiga-Toxigenic Escherichia coli - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Socioeconomic Factors
Virulence Factors - genetics
Abstract
Verotoxigenic E. coli (VTEC) is the cause of severe gastrointestinal infection especially among infants. Between 10 and 20 cases are reported annually to the National Infectious Disease Register (NIDR) in Finland. The aim of this study was to identify explanatory variables for VTEC infections reported to the NIDR in Finland between 1997 and 2006. We applied a hurdle model, applicable for a dataset with an excess of zeros.
We enrolled 131 domestically acquired primary cases of VTEC between 1997 and 2006 from routine surveillance data. The isolated strains were characterized by virulence type, serogroup, phage type and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. By applying a two-part Bayesian hurdle model to infectious disease surveillance data, we were able to create a model in which the covariates were associated with the probability for occurrence of the cases in the logistic regression part and the magnitude of covariate changes in the Poisson regression part if cases do occur. The model also included spatial correlations between neighbouring municipalities.
The average annual incidence rate was 4.8 cases per million inhabitants based on the cases as reported to the NIDR. Of the 131 cases, 74 VTEC O157 and 58 non-O157 strains were isolated (one person had dual infections). The number of bulls per human population and the proportion of the population with a higher education were associated with an increased occurrence and incidence of human VTEC infections in 70 (17%) of 416 of Finnish municipalities. In addition, the proportion of fresh water per area, the proportion of cultivated land per area and the proportion of low income households with children were associated with increased incidence of VTEC infections.
With hurdle models we were able to distinguish between risk factors for the occurrence of the disease and the incidence of the disease for data characterised by an excess of zeros. The density of bulls and the proportion of the population with higher education were significant both for occurrence and incidence, while the proportion of fresh water, cultivated land, and the proportion of low income households with children were significant for the incidence of the disease.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22008456 View in PubMed
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Agroenvironmental determinants associated with the presence of antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli in beach waters in Quebec, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132370
Source
Zoonoses Public Health. 2011 Sep;58(6):432-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
P. Turgeon
P. Michel
P. Levallois
P. Chevalier
D. Daignault
B. Crago
R. Irwin
S A McEwen
N F Neumann
M. Louie
Author Affiliation
Faculté de Médecine Vétérinaire, Université de Montréal, Saint-Hyacinthe, QC, Canada. patricia.turgeon@umontreal.ca
Source
Zoonoses Public Health. 2011 Sep;58(6):432-9
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agriculture
Animals
Bathing Beaches
Escherichia coli - isolation & purification
Human Activities
Humans
Lakes - microbiology
Logistic Models
Quebec
Seasons
Time Factors
Water Microbiology
Abstract
Exposure to microorganisms resistant to antimicrobials may constitute a health risk to human populations. It is believed that one route of exposure occurs when people engage in recreational activities in water contaminated with these microorganisms. The main objective of this study was to explore population-level and environmental determinants specifically associated with the presence of antimicrobial resistant (AMR) generic Escherichia coli isolated from recreational waters sampled from beaches located in southern Quebec, Canada. Water samples originated from the Quebec provincial beach surveillance program for the summers of 2004 and 2005. This study focused on three classes of determinants, namely: agricultural, population-level and beach characteristics for a total of 19 specific factors. The study was designed as a retrospective observational analysis and factors were assessed using logistic regression methods. From the multivariable analysis, the data suggested that the percentage of land used for spreading liquid manure was a significant factor associated with the presence of AMR E. coli (OR=27.73). Conceptually, broad factors potentially influencing the presence of AMR bacteria in water must be assessed specifically in addition to factors associated with general microbial contamination. Presence of AMR E. coli in recreational waters from beaches in southern Quebec may represent a risk for people engaging in water activities and this study provides preliminary evidence that agricultural practices, specifically spreading liquid manure in agricultural lands nearby beaches, may be linked to the contamination of these waters by AMR E. coli.
PubMed ID
21824340 View in PubMed
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Albuminuria and estimated GFR 5 years after Escherichia coli O157 hemolytic uremic syndrome: an update.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158651
Source
Am J Kidney Dis. 2008 Mar;51(3):435-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Amit X Garg
Marina Salvadori
Justin M Okell
Heather R Thiessen-Philbrook
Rita S Suri
Guido Filler
Louise Moist
Douglas Matsell
William F Clark
Author Affiliation
Division of Nephrology, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada. amit.garg@lhsc.on.ca
Source
Am J Kidney Dis. 2008 Mar;51(3):435-44
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Albuminuria - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Outbreaks
Escherichia coli O157
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome - complications - etiology - microbiology
Humans
Infant
Kidney Function Tests
Male
Ontario
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Water Microbiology
Water supply
Abstract
Knowledge of the long-term prognosis of patients with diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is important for patient counseling and follow-up. Estimates in the literature are highly variable, and previous studies did not use a healthy control group to establish outcomes attributable to HUS.
Prospective cohort study.
19 children who recovered from HUS after contamination of their municipal water supply by Escherichia coli O157:H7.
Outcomes of children who recovered from HUS were compared with a control group of 64 children who were healthy at the time of the outbreak. Both groups were similar in their demographics and follow-up testing.
Proteinuria, blood pressure, glomerular filtration rate (GFR) estimated by using serum creatinine or cystatin C level, and biochemical measures 5 years after the outbreak.
More children who recovered from HUS showed microalbuminuria than controls (20% versus 3%; relative risk, 6.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.1 to 32.8). There were no differences between groups in blood pressure or GFR when estimated by using serum creatinine level. GFR estimated by using cystatin C level was lower after HUS compared with controls (100 versus 110 mL/min/1.73 m(2); P = 0.02), but no child had a GFR less than 80 mL/min/1.73 m(2). Other results, including fasting glucose, albumin, and C-reactive protein levels, did not differ between groups.
Although the homogenous nature of this outbreak is a strength, long-term results may generalize less well to patients with other strains of toxigenic E coli or in other settings.
The prognosis of patients with HUS in this cohort was better than in other studies. Ongoing follow-up will clarify the clinical relevance of microalbuminuria and mild decreases in GFR 5 years after HUS recovery.
PubMed ID
18295059 View in PubMed
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881 records – page 1 of 89.