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17 records – page 1 of 2.

Anti-Thrombosis Activity of Sinapic Acid Isolated from the Lees of Bokbunja Wine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277223
Source
J Microbiol Biotechnol. 2016 Jan;26(1):61-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
Mi-Sun Kim
Woo-Chang Shin
Dong-Kyoon Kang
Ho-Yong Sohn
Source
J Microbiol Biotechnol. 2016 Jan;26(1):61-5
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Coumaric Acids - chemistry - isolation & purification - pharmacology
Erythrocytes - cytology - drug effects
Fibrinolytic Agents - chemistry - isolation & purification - pharmacology
Humans
Russia
Wine - analysis
Abstract
From the lees of bokbunja wine (LBW) made from Rubus coreanus Miquel, we have identified six compounds (1: trans-4-hydroxycinnamic acid; 2: trans-4-hydroxy-3-methoxycinnamic acid; 3: 3,4-dihydroxycinnamic acid; 4: 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzoic acid; 5: 3,5-dimethoxy-4- hydroxybenzoic acid; and 6: 3,5-dimethoxy-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (sinapic acid)) through silica gel chromatography and UHPLC-MS. The compounds 1-6 showed strong anticoagulation and platelet aggregation inhibitory activities without hemolytic effect against human red blood cells. To date, this is the first report of the in vitro anti-thrombosis activity of sinapic acid. Our results suggest that different cinnamic and benzoic acid derivatives are closely linked to the anti-thrombosis activity of LBW, and sinapic acid could be developed as a promising anti-thrombosis agent.
PubMed ID
26387815 View in PubMed
Less detail

Apoptotic death in erythrocytes of lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis induced by ionomycin and tert-butyl hydroperoxide.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280918
Source
Comp Biochem Physiol C Toxicol Pharmacol. 2017 Apr;194:48-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2017
Author
Natalia I Agalakova
Tatiana I Ivanova
Gennadii P Gusev
Anna V Nazarenkova
Dina A Sufiyeva
Source
Comp Biochem Physiol C Toxicol Pharmacol. 2017 Apr;194:48-60
Date
Apr-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Apoptosis - drug effects
Biomarkers - blood - metabolism
Calcium Ionophores - toxicity
Cell Size
Cell Survival - drug effects
Erythrocytes - cytology - drug effects - metabolism
Female
Ionomycin - toxicity
Kinetics
Lampreys
Male
Membrane Potential, Mitochondrial - drug effects
Oxidants - toxicity
Oxidative Stress - drug effects
Rivers
Russia
Water Pollutants, Chemical - toxicity
tert-Butylhydroperoxide - toxicity
Abstract
The work examined the effects of Ca(2+) overload and oxidative damage on erythrocytes of river lamprey Lampetra fluvialtilis. The cells were incubated for 3h with 0.1-5µM Ca(2+) ionophore ionomycin in combination with 2.5mM Ca(2+) and 10-100µM pro-oxidant agent tert-butyl hydroperoxide (tBHP). The sensitivity of lamprey RBCs to studied compounds was evaluated by the kinetics of their death. Both toxicants induced dose- and time dependent phosphatidylserine (PS) externalization (annexin V-FITC labeling) and loss of membrane integrity (propidium iodide uptake). Highest doses of ionomycin (1-2µM) increased the number of PS-exposed erythrocytes to 7-9% within 3h, while 100µM tBHP produced up to 50% of annexin V-FITC-positive cells. Caspase inhibitor Boc-D-FMK (50µM), calpain inhibitor PD150606 (10µM) and broad protease inhibitor leupeptin (200µM) did not prevent ionomycin-induced PS externalization, whereas tBHP-triggered apoptosis was blunted by Boc-D-FMK. tBHP-dependent death of lamprey erythrocytes was accompanied by the decrease in relative cell size, loss of cell viability, activation of caspases 9 and 3/7, and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, but all these processes were partially attenuated by Boc-D-FMK. None of examined death-associated events were observed in ionomycin-treated erythrocytes except activation of caspase-9. Incubation with ionomycin did not alter intracellular K(+) and Na(+) content, while exposure to tBHP resulted in 80% loss of K(+) and 2.8-fold accumulation of Na(+). Thus, lamprey erythrocytes appear to be more susceptible to oxidative damage. Ca(2+) overload does not activate the cytosolic death pathways in these cells.
PubMed ID
28163253 View in PubMed
Less detail

Comprehensive survey of red blood cell unit life cycle at a large teaching institution in eastern Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148498
Source
Transfusion. 2010 Jan;50(1):160-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Calvino K Cheng
Dawn Trethewey
Irene Sadek
Author Affiliation
Division of Hematopathology, Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. calvino.cheng@cdha.nshealth.ca
Source
Transfusion. 2010 Jan;50(1):160-5
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Banks - statistics & numerical data
Blood Preservation - statistics & numerical data
Cell Survival
Data Collection
Erythrocyte Transfusion
Erythrocytes - cytology
Hospitals, Teaching - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Medical Waste - statistics & numerical data
Nova Scotia
Retrospective Studies
Time Factors
Abstract
Recent blood shortages and the potential clinical impact of red blood cell (RBC) age highlight the need to understand blood supply delivery. This study addresses the characteristics and mechanics of RBC unit trafficking and storage across the transfusion service, previously undescribed in the literature.
This retrospective qualitative institutionwide survey assessed the comprehensive RBC life cycle within Capital District Health Authority in Nova Scotia, Canada, during 2007.
A total of 15,930 unique RBC units were received from the supplier with 98.6% having mean age of 12.5 days. The mean ages on receipt, transfusion, and time spent in the transfusion system before transfusion were 12, 19.6, and 7.5 days, respectively. Of 12,298 units, 9689 (78.8%) remained within the blood transfusion services (BTSs), while 2609 (21.2%) migrated having been returned a mean of 1.26 times from locations outside BTS (SD, 0.56 times), the latter spending a mean of 18.4 hours outside the BTS. Stationary units had mean age at dispense and time spent in the transfusion system of 19.2 and 6.9 days, respectively, compared to migratory units at 21.3 and 9.9 days, respectively (p
PubMed ID
19761550 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cryopreservative effects of the recombinant ice-binding protein from the arctic yeast Leucosporidium sp. on red blood cells.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124115
Source
Appl Biochem Biotechnol. 2012 Jun;167(4):824-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Sung Gu Lee
Hye Yeon Koh
Jun Hyuck Lee
Sung-Ho Kang
Hak Jun Kim
Author Affiliation
Division of Polar Life Sciences, Korea Polar Research Institute, Incheon, Republic of Korea.
Source
Appl Biochem Biotechnol. 2012 Jun;167(4):824-34
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Basidiomycota - chemistry
Cell Count
Cell Size - drug effects
Cryopreservation
Crystallization
Erythrocytes - cytology - drug effects - immunology
Fungal Proteins - isolation & purification - metabolism - pharmacology
Hemolysis - drug effects
Humans
Ice
Recombinant Proteins - isolation & purification - metabolism - pharmacology
Abstract
Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) have important functions in many freeze-tolerant organisms. The proteins non-colligatively lower the freezing point and functionally inhibit ice recrystallization in frozen solutions. In our previous studies, we found that the Arctic yeast Leucosporidium sp. produces an AFP (LeIBP), and that the protein could be successfully produced in Pichia expression system. The present study showed that recombinant LeIBP possesses the ability to reduce the damage induced to red blood cells (RBCs) by freeze thawing. In addition to 40 % glycerol, both 0.4 and 0.8 mg/ml LeIBPs significantly reduced freeze-thaw-induced hemolysis at either rapid- (45 °C) or slow-warming (22 °C) temperatures. Post-thaw cell counts of the cryopreserved RBCs were dramatically enhanced, in particular, in 0.8 mg/ml LeIBP. Interestingly, the cryopreserved cells in the presence of LeIBP showed preserved cell size distribution. These results indicate that the ability of LeIBP to inhibit ice recrystallization helps the RBCs avoid critically damaging electrolyte concentrations, which are known as solution effects. Considering all these data, LeIBP can be thought of as a key component in improving RBC cryopreservation efficiency.
PubMed ID
22622645 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Effect of diet enriched with essential nutrients and S-adenosylmethionine on the structural and functional state of erythrocytes in patients with metabolic syndrome]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78314
Source
Lik Sprava. 2006 Jul-Sep;(5-6):16-23
Publication Type
Article
Author
Anokhina S V
Source
Lik Sprava. 2006 Jul-Sep;(5-6):16-23
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Body mass index
Diet, Carbohydrate-Restricted - methods
Dietary Supplements
Erythrocyte Indices
Erythrocytes - cytology
Humans
Metabolic Syndrome X - blood - diet therapy
Middle Aged
S-Adenosylmethionine - administration & dosage
Abstract
An analysis of structural and functional state of erythrocytes of 136 patients with metabolic syndrome and nourishment of these patients have been outlined in the article. It was determined that the diet with decreased level of carbohydrate and enriched in amino-acids, lecithin, vitamins and antioxidants enables weight correction and normalization of structural and functional state of erythrocytes.
PubMed ID
17380864 View in PubMed
Less detail

Identified metabolic signature for assessing red blood cell unit quality is associated with endothelial damage markers and clinical outcomes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275740
Source
Transfusion. 2016 Apr;56(4):852-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Aarash Bordbar
Pär I Johansson
Giuseppe Paglia
Scott J Harrison
Kristine Wichuk
Manuela Magnusdottir
Sóley Valgeirsdottir
Mikkel Gybel-Brask
Sisse R Ostrowski
Sirus Palsson
Ottar Rolfsson
Olafur E Sigurjónsson
Morten B Hansen
Sveinn Gudmundsson
Bernhard O Palsson
Source
Transfusion. 2016 Apr;56(4):852-62
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biomarkers - blood - metabolism
Blood Preservation - methods - standards
Denmark
Endothelium, Vascular - metabolism - pathology
Erythrocyte Transfusion - standards
Erythrocytes - cytology - metabolism
Healthy Volunteers
Humans
Iceland
Male
Metabolome
Metabolomics
Quality Control
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
There has been interest in determining whether older red blood cell (RBC) units have negative clinical effects. Numerous observational studies have shown that older RBC units are an independent factor for patient mortality. However, recently published randomized clinical trials have shown no difference of clinical outcome for patients receiving old or fresh RBCs. An overlooked but essential issue in assessing RBC unit quality and ultimately designing the necessary clinical trials is a metric for what constitutes an old or fresh RBC unit.
Twenty RBC units were profiled using quantitative metabolomics over 42 days of storage in SAGM with 3- to 4-day time intervals. Metabolic pathway usage during storage was assessed using systems biology methods. The detected time intervals of the metabolic states were compared to clinical outcomes.
Using multivariate statistics, we identified a nonlinear decay process exhibiting three distinct metabolic states (Days 0-10, 10-17, and 17-42). Hematologic variables traditionally measured in the transfusion setting (e.g., pH, hemolysis, RBC indices) did not distinguish these three states. Systemic changes in pathway usage occurred between the three states, with key pathways changing in both magnitude and direction. Finally, an association was found between the time periods of the metabolic states with the clinical outcomes of more than 280,000 patients in the country of Denmark transfused over the past 15 years and endothelial damage markers in healthy volunteers undergoing autologous transfusions.
The state of RBC metabolism may be a better indicator of cellular quality than traditional hematologic variables.
PubMed ID
26749434 View in PubMed
Less detail

Induction of micronuclei following exposure to methylene di-phenyl diisocyanate: potential genotoxic metabolites.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15547
Source
Toxicol Sci. 2000 Nov;58(1):102-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2000
Author
B Z Zhong
P D Siegel
Author Affiliation
Health Effect Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, West Virginia 26505-2888, USA.
Source
Toxicol Sci. 2000 Nov;58(1):102-8
Date
Nov-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aerosols
Aniline Compounds - toxicity
Animals
Bone Marrow Cells - cytology - drug effects
Carcinogens - administration & dosage - metabolism - toxicity
Cell Line
Cricetinae
Cysteine - metabolism
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Erythrocytes - cytology - drug effects
Fibroblasts - drug effects
Glutathione - metabolism
Inhalation Exposure
Isocyanates - administration & dosage - metabolism - toxicity
Micronucleus Tests
Microsomes, Liver - drug effects - metabolism
Mutagens - administration & dosage - metabolism - toxicity
Rats
Rats, Inbred Strains
Rats, Sprague-Dawley
Abstract
Methylene di-phenyl diisocyanate (MDI) is used to make polyurethane products. The predominant occupational disease attributed to diisocyanates, including MDI, is asthma; however, the potential for genotoxicity has also been of concern. Diisocyanates are very reactive compounds that can undergo nonenzymatic hydrolysis to form methylenedianiline (MDA), or react under physiological conditions with primary amines to form ureas and/or with thiols to form labile thiol acid esters. MDA is a carcinogen in animals and a suspected carcinogen in humans. Brown Norway rats (BNR) were exposed to either 7 or 113 mg/m(3) MDI aerosol for 1 h/week x3 weeks and sacrificed 1 week later. Micronuclei (MN) formation was assessed from bone marrow polychromatic erythrocytes (PCE). A dose-dependent increase in the frequency of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MN-PCEs) was noted. In vitro exposure of Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts (V79) to MDA or MDI-thiol conjugates, but not to MDI, significantly increased the frequency of MN. MDI-thiol conjugate-exposed cell cultures did not have detectable levels of MDA. A significant increase in the number of V79 cells in metaphase, as well as the number of cells with precipitants within both the cytoplasm and nuclei, were noted in MDI-glutathione-exposed cultures. The results of this study indicate that MDI aerosol exposure can cause MN formation through either the hydrolysis of MDI to MDA or possibly the formation of thiol conjugates.
PubMed ID
11053546 View in PubMed
Less detail

Micronucleus test of erythrocytes and lymphocytes in the blood of the Altai region residents living near the Semipalatinsk atomic proving ground.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207705
Source
Mutat Res. 1997 Aug 14;392(3):223-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-14-1997
Author
N N Ilyinskikh
A V Eremich
I I Ivanchuk
E N Ilyinskikh
Author Affiliation
Sibirian Medical University, Russian Federation. root@ecogen.tomsk.su
Source
Mutat Res. 1997 Aug 14;392(3):223-8
Date
Aug-14-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Chromosome Aberrations
Erythrocytes - cytology - radiation effects
Female
Humans
Male
Micronucleus Tests
Nuclear Warfare
Radiation Injuries - epidemiology
Radioactive Fallout - adverse effects
Siberia - epidemiology
T-Lymphocytes - cytology - radiation effects
Abstract
We analysed the erythrocytes and lymphocytes with micronuclei of 3902 individuals living in 16 settlements in the west of the Altai region. It was found that the majority of individuals with high frequencies of micronucleated cells were in the settlements located near to the Semipalatinsk atomic proving ground. In particular, considerable cytogenetic alterations were found in individuals born during the period of intensive testing on the Semipalatinsk proving ground (from 1949 to 1962). The data we have obtained allow us to conclude that radiation damage of cytogenetic structures in the prenatal (predelivery) and early postnatal periods leading to the formation of micronuclei can remain in the human organism for decades and, perhaps, throughout life.
PubMed ID
9294021 View in PubMed
Less detail

Phenotype-environment association of the oxygen transport system in trimorphic European whitefish (Coregonus lavaretus) populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260846
Source
Evolution. 2014 Aug;68(8):2197-210
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Melissa L Evans
Kim Praebel
Stefano Peruzzi
Per-Arne Amundsen
Louis Bernatchez
Source
Evolution. 2014 Aug;68(8):2197-210
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Biological Evolution
Erythrocytes - cytology
Gene-Environment Interaction
Genetics, Population
Genotype
Hemoglobins - genetics
Lakes
Norway
Oxygen - physiology
Phenotype
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Salmonidae - genetics - physiology
Abstract
Replicated adaptive radiation events, typified by phenotypic divergence across resource axes, provide important insight into the eco-evolutionary dynamics that lead to the formation of new species. Here, we show that in trimorphic adaptive radiations of European whitefish (Coregonus lavaretus), divergence of the oxygen transport system has occurred across the pelagic/littoral (shallow)-profundal (deep) resource axis, and at multiple biological scales. Profundal whitefish exhibited significantly larger red blood cells (RBCs), a greater proportion of cathodic hemoglobin protein components, and higher hemoglobin transcript abundance in kidney compared to littoral and pelagic morphs. Hemoglobin transcript abundance in brain and gill, but not kidney, and anodic hemoglobin protein component diversity in blood were also linked to variation at an intronic single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). As the whitefish morphs differ in population genetic structure at this SNP, hemoglobin transcript and protein divergence between profundal and pelagic/littoral morphs is likely being driven by genetic divergence. Our findings, along with our previous work on lake whitefish, highlight the importance of the oxygen transport system to the postglacial colonization of novel lacustrine environments by whitefish throughout the northern hemisphere.
PubMed ID
24766154 View in PubMed
Less detail

17 records – page 1 of 2.