Skip header and navigation

Refine By

59 records – page 1 of 6.

Abnormal hematologic profiles in elite cross-country skiers: blood doping or?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71327
Source
Clin J Sport Med. 2003 May;13(3):132-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2003
Author
James Stray-Gundersen
Tapio Videman
Ilkka Penttilä
Inggard Lereim
Author Affiliation
jimsg@singlepoint.net
Source
Clin J Sport Med. 2003 May;13(3):132-7
Date
May-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Doping in Sports - statistics & numerical data
Erythrocyte Indices - drug effects
Erythropoiesis - drug effects - physiology
Female
Hemoglobins - analysis
Humans
Male
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Reticulocyte Count
Skiing - physiology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: There is widespread public concern about fairness in sports. Blood doping undermines fairness and places athletes' health at risk. The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence of abnormal hematologic profiles in elite cross-country skiers, which may indicate a high probability of blood doping. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: Samples were obtained as part of routine International Ski Federation blood testing procedures from participants at the World Ski Championships. Sixty-eight percent of all skiers and 92% of those finishing in the top 10 places were tested. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Using flow cytometry, we analyzed erythrocyte and reticulocyte indices. Reference values were from the 1989 Nordic Ski World Championships data set and the International Olympic Committee Erythropoietin 2000 project. RESULTS: Of the skiers tested and finishing within the top 50 places in the competitions, 17% had "highly abnormal" hematologic profiles, 19% had "abnormal" values, and 64% were normal. Fifty percent of medal winners and 33% of those finishing from 4th to 10th place had highly abnormal hematologic profiles. In contrast, only 3% of skiers finishing from 41st to 50th place had highly abnormal values. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that blood doping is both prevalent and effective in cross-country ski racing, and current testing programs for blood doping are ineffective. It is unlikely that blood doping is less common in other endurance sports. Ramifications of doping affect not only elite athletes who may feel compelled to risk their health but also the general population, particularly young people.
PubMed ID
12792206 View in PubMed
Less detail

Anemia and iron deficiency in inflammatory bowel disease: an open, prospective, observational study on diagnosis, treatment with ferric carboxymaltose and quality of life.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108423
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2013 Sep;48(9):1027-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Author
Ragnar Befrits
Ola Wikman
Lars Blomquist
Henrik Hjortswang
Per Hammarlund
Antal Bajor
Daniel Klintman
Håkan Blom
Author Affiliation
Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Karolinska University Hospital, 17176 Stockholm, Sweden. ragnar.befrits@karolinska.se
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2013 Sep;48(9):1027-32
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Intravenous
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anemia - blood - diagnosis - drug therapy - etiology
Colitis, Ulcerative - complications
Crohn Disease - complications
Erythrocyte Indices
Female
Ferric Compounds - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Ferritins - blood
Guideline Adherence
Hematinics - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Hemoglobins - metabolism
Humans
Iron - deficiency
Male
Maltose - adverse effects - analogs & derivatives - therapeutic use
Middle Aged
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Sweden
Transferrin - metabolism
Young Adult
Abstract
Iron deficiency and anemia are being increasingly recognized as a complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The aim of this study was to observe, in a non-interventional way, how Swedish gastroenterologists adhere to guidelines in IBD outpatients treated with intravenous ferric carboxymaltose (FCM), and the result of treatment.
Altogether 394 IBD patients (Crohn's disease (CD) 60%, ulcerative colitis (UC) 40%) from 14 centers were included. Group A (n = 216) was observed from November 2008 and group B (n = 178) from March 2010. Time of observation ranged from 12 to 29 months.
S-Ferritin (?mol/l) and transferrin saturation (T-Sat; %) were recorded at baseline in 62% and 50% in group A. Median values for Hb, ferritin and T-Sat at baseline were 111 g/l, 10 ?mol/l and10%, respectively, and 134 g/l, 121 ?mol/l and 20% after iron treatment (p
PubMed ID
23889159 View in PubMed
Less detail

An Ontario-wide study of vitamin B12, serum folate, and red cell folate levels in relation to plasma homocysteine: is a preventable public health issue on the rise?.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197028
Source
Clin Biochem. 2000 Jul;33(5):337-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2000
Author
J G Ray
D E Cole
S C Boss
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Women's College Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.
Source
Clin Biochem. 2000 Jul;33(5):337-43
Date
Jul-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Biological Markers
Creatinine - blood
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dietary Supplements - statistics & numerical data
Erythrocyte Indices
Erythrocytes - chemistry
Female
Folic Acid Deficiency - blood - metabolism
Hemoglobins
Homocysteine - blood
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Retrospective Studies
Sex Factors
Vitamin B 12 - blood
Vitamin B 12 Deficiency - blood - epidemiology
Abstract
Plasma homocysteine has been reported to be useful in the evaluation of patients with suspected vitamin B12 or folate deficiency. In November 1998, Canada began its mandatory fortification of all flour, and some corn and rice products, with folic acid. We evaluated the status of folate and vitamin B12 in Ontario since this fortification program began, and also studied the role of plasma homocysteine in the assessment of vitamin B12 deficiency since that time.
A retrospective cross-sectional study design was performed using a community database of all Ontario samples analyzed by MDS Laboratories, a major provider of diagnostic laboratory services in Canada. All consecutive single-patient fasting samples for plasma homocysteine collected between January 1 and September 30, 1999 were included, as well as corresponding red cell folate and serum B12 concentrations. Data for serum folate were included when available. Descriptive statistics included the arithmetic and geometric means for each measure, as well as the lower and upper centile values. After excluding cases with a concomitant serum creatinine > 120 micromol/L or red cell folate 15 micromol/L did not discriminate between cobalamin concentrations below versus above 120 pmol/L (positive and negative predictive values 7.4% and 97.2%, respectively), nor did it discriminate "indeterminate" B12 levels between 120 and 150 pmol/L (positive and negative predictive values 6.3% and 94.0%, respectively).
In a large select group of Ontarians, serum and red cell folate concentrations appear to be higher than expected, possibly due to a recent national folate fortification programme; cobalamin levels are no higher than expected. Given our inability to detect mild B12 deficiency using such indicators as plasma homocysteine, and considering the substantial growth in the elderly segment of the Canadian population, occult cobalamin deficiency could become a common disorder. Accordingly, we recommend either consideration of the addition of vitamin B12 to the current folate fortification programme, and/or the development of better methods for the detection of cobalamin deficiency.
PubMed ID
11018684 View in PubMed
Less detail

The association between iron deficiency and febrile seizures in childhood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152515
Source
Clin Pediatr (Phila). 2009 May;48(4):420-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Dawn S Hartfield
Jonathan Tan
Jerome Y Yager
Rhonda J Rosychuk
Don Spady
Christina Haines
William R Craig
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. dawn.hartfield@capitalhealth.ca
Source
Clin Pediatr (Phila). 2009 May;48(4):420-6
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta - epidemiology
Anemia, Iron-Deficiency - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Emergency Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Erythrocyte Indices
Female
Humans
Infant
Iron - blood - deficiency
Male
Odds Ratio
Retrospective Studies
Seizures, Febrile - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to determine the association between iron deficiency and febrile seizures in a large cohort of children aged 6 to 36 months.
A retrospective case control study with 361 patients who presented with febrile seizures to the emergency department and 390 otherwise healthy controls who presented with a febrile illness to the emergency department were reviewed to determine iron status using the MCV, RDW, and hemoglobin.
A total of 9% of cases had iron deficiency (ID) and 6% had iron deficiency anemia (IDA), compared to 5% and 4% of controls respectively. The conditional logistic regression odds ratio for ID in patients with febrile seizures was 1.84 (95% CI, 1.02-3.31).
Children with febrile seizures were almost twice as likely to be iron deficient as those with febrile illness alone. The results suggest that screening for ID should be considered in children presenting with febrile seizure.
PubMed ID
19229063 View in PubMed
Less detail

Biological markers of problem drinking in homeless patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147342
Source
Addict Behav. 2010 Mar;35(3):260-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010
Author
Henrik Thiesen
Morten Hesse
Author Affiliation
City of Copenhagen HealthTeam, 2300 Copenhagen S, Denmark. alkodoktor@dadlnet.dk
Source
Addict Behav. 2010 Mar;35(3):260-2
Date
Mar-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - blood
Alcoholism - blood - diagnosis
Aspartate Aminotransferases - blood
Biological Markers - blood
Denmark
Erythrocyte Indices
Female
Homeless Persons
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Sensitivity and specificity
Transferrin - analogs & derivatives - chemistry
Young Adult
gamma-Glutamyltransferase - blood
Abstract
In the search for optimal biomarkers of excessive drinking, a central limitation has been the lack of sensitivity of measures. Many patients have apparently normal values of liver markers despite a considerable alcohol intake. This study aimed to test a novel combined indicator of alcohol drinking.
Concentrations of carbohydrate-deficient transferrin (%CDT), gamma glutamyl transferase (gammaGT), aspartate aminotransferase (ASAT), and mean corpuscular volume (MCV), together with a combined index of the %CDT and gammaGT, the Antilla Index (AI), were studied in 104 homeless patients with (n = 87) or without (n = 24) problem drinking according to the Fast Alcohol Screening Test.
Concentrations of all markers were significantly higher in the alcoholic patients than in other homeless patients. The best agreement between liver markers and self-reported status was found between the combined %CDT and gammaGT index (kappa = 0.61, p
PubMed ID
19917520 View in PubMed
Less detail

The CAGE as a measure of hazardous drinking in the homeless.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87737
Source
Am J Addict. 2007 Nov-Dec;16(6):475-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Hesse Morten
Thiesen Henrik
Author Affiliation
Aarhus University, Centre for Alcohol and Drug Research, Copenhagen Division, Copenhagen, Denmark. mortenhesse@crf.dk
Source
Am J Addict. 2007 Nov-Dec;16(6):475-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alanine Transaminase - blood
Alcohol Drinking - blood - epidemiology - psychology
Alcoholism - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Alkaline Phosphatase - blood
Biological Markers - blood
Denmark - epidemiology
Erythrocyte Indices
Feasibility Studies
Female
Hepatitis C - blood - epidemiology
Homebound Persons - psychology
Humans
Liver Function Tests - statistics & numerical data
Male
Mass Screening - methods
Personality Inventory - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Risk factors
gamma-Glutamyltransferase - blood
Abstract
The aim of this study was to test the validity of the CAGE questions as a measure of severe drinking in subjects at drop-in centers for the homeless, using biological markers of acute liver reaction to alcohol as the "gold standard." A sample of homeless men and women in Copenhagen were invited to participate in a study of health problems. Subjects were interviewed and blood samples were taken and screened for indicators of liver dysfunction (gamma-glutamyltransferase [gammaGT], mean corpuscular volume [MCV], alanine aminotransferase [ALAT], and alkaline phosphatase [Alpase]), and hepatitis C [HCV]. Scores on CAGE correlated strongly with years of heavy drinking (rho = 0.43, p 1 had quite extreme values on liver markers. Findings suggested that the CAGE was able to identify homeless drinkers whose drinking was significantly associated with increases in biomarkers associated with heavy drinking.
PubMed ID
18058413 View in PubMed
Less detail

Can routine information from electronic patient records predict a future diagnosis of alcohol use disorder?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282127
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2016 Sep;34(3):215-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
Torgeir Gilje Lid
Geir Egil Eide
Ingvild Dalen
Eivind Meland
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2016 Sep;34(3):215-23
Date
Sep-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcoholism - diagnosis
Analgesics, Opioid - therapeutic use
Benzodiazepines - therapeutic use
Codeine - therapeutic use
Early Diagnosis
Electronic Health Records
Erythrocyte Indices
Ethylmorphine - therapeutic use
Female
General practice
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Sick Leave
Tramadol - therapeutic use
Young Adult
gamma-Glutamyltransferase
Abstract
To explore whether information regarding potentially alcohol-related health incidents recorded in electronic patient records might aid in earlier identification of alcohol use disorders.
We extracted potentially alcohol-related information in electronic patient records and tested if alcohol-related diagnoses, prescriptions of codeine, tramadol, ethylmorphine, and benzodiazepines; elevated levels of gamma-glutamyl-transferase (GGT), and mean cell volume (MCV); and new sick leave certificates predicted specific alcohol use disorder.
Nine general practitioner surgeries with varying size and stability.
Totally 20,764 patients with active electronic patient record until data gathering and with a history of at least four years without a specific alcohol use disorder after turning 18 years of age.
The Cox proportional hazard analysis with time-dependent covariates of potential accumulated risks over the previous four years.
Time from inclusion until the first specific alcohol use disorder, defined by either an alcohol specific diagnostic code or a text fragment documenting an alcohol problem.
In the unadjusted and adjusted Cox-regression with time-dependent covariates all variables were highly significant with adjusted hazard ratios ranging from 1.25 to 3.50. Addictive drugs, sick leaves, GGT, MCV and International Classification for Primary Care version 2 (ICPC-2), and International Classification of Diseases version 10 (ICD-10) diagnoses were analyzed. Elevated GGT and MCV, ICD-10-diagnoses, and gender demonstrated the highest hazard ratios.
Many frequent health problems are potential predictors of an increased risk or vulnerability for alcohol use disorders. However, due to the modest hazard ratios, we were unable to establish a clinically useful tool. KEY POINTS Alcohol is potentially relevant for many health problems, but current strategies for identification and intervention in primary health care have not been successful. Many frequent clinical problems recorded in electronic patient records may indicate an increased risk for alcohol related health problems. The hazard ratios were modest and the resulting predictive model was unsatisfactory for diagnostic purposes. If we accepted a sensitivity as low as 0.50, the specificity slightly exceeded 0.75. With a low prevalent condition, it is obvious that the false positive problem will be vast. In addition to responding to elevated blood levels of liver enzymes, general practitioners should be aware of alcohol as a potentially relevant factor for patients with repeated events of many mental and psychosocial diagnoses and new sick leaves and repeated prescriptions of addictive drugs.
Notes
Cites: Alcohol Alcohol. 2011 May-Jun;46(3):283-9121414949
Cites: Addict Behav. 2012 Nov;37(11):1211-622749342
Cites: Alcohol Alcohol. 2014 Jan-Feb;49(1):66-7824232177
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 2010 Dec;28(4):221-820704522
Cites: BMJ. 2013 Jan 09;346:e850123303891
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2010 Jul;39(1):93-820547282
Cites: BMJ. 2006 Mar 4;332(7540):511-716488896
Cites: Alcohol Alcohol. 2016 Jul;51(4):422-726574600
Cites: Addiction. 2010 May;105(5):817-4320331573
Cites: Alcohol Alcohol. 2013 Mar-Apr;48(2):172-923299569
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 2006 Apr;59(4):393-40316549262
Cites: Eur J Public Health. 2009 Jan;19(1):19-2219033355
Cites: Alcohol Alcohol. 2000 Sep-Oct;35(5):525-3011022028
Cites: Alcohol Alcohol. 2011 Jan-Feb;46(1):52-6021059696
Cites: BMJ. 2013 Mar 19;346:f119123512758
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 1998 May;14(4):245-589635069
Cites: BMJ. 2015 Feb 19;350:h71525698774
Cites: BMJ. 2002 Oct 19;325(7369):87012386040
Cites: Addict Sci Clin Pract. 2014 Aug 27;9:1425168288
Cites: Ann Surg. 2011 Jan;253(1):27-3421294285
Cites: Int J Med Inform. 2009 Dec;78(12):808-1419828365
Cites: Addiction. 2012 Sep;107(9):1601-1122372573
Cites: Alcohol Alcohol. 1996 May;31(3):287-968844035
Cites: Drug Alcohol Rev. 2009 May;28(3):301-2319489992
Cites: CMAJ. 1995 Mar 15;152(6):863-97697579
Cites: Br J Addict. 1987 Feb;82(2):197-2013471249
Cites: Scand J Urol. 2015 Feb;49(1):8-1525141128
Cites: Alcohol. 2004 Feb;32(2):157-6115163566
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 2012 Jun;30(2):64-922643149
Cites: Br J Gen Pract. 2001 Mar;51(464):206-1711255902
Cites: Drug Alcohol Rev. 2005 Nov;24(6):537-4716361210
Cites: Lancet. 2009 Jun 27;373(9682):2223-3319560604
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 2013 Dec;31(4):227-3424164371
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2015 Mar;43(2):153-825564115
Cites: J Anxiety Disord. 2009 Jan;23(1):38-4518571370
PubMed ID
27404326 View in PubMed
Less detail

Community prevalence of alcohol use and concomitant use of medication--a source of possible risk in the elderly aged 75 and older?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173826
Source
Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2005 Jul;20(7):680-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2005
Author
Marja Aira
Sirpa Hartikainen
Raimo Sulkava
Author Affiliation
Inner-Savo Health Centre, Finland. marja.aira@uku.fi
Source
Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2005 Jul;20(7):680-5
Date
Jul-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - blood - epidemiology
Drug Interactions
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Epidemiologic Methods
Erythrocyte Indices - drug effects
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Nonprescription Drugs - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Pharmaceutical Preparations - administration & dosage
Abstract
To explore alcohol use and concomitant use of prescription and over the counter (OTC) medicines in people aged 75 years or over.
Community-based randomized survey of home-dwelling elderly persons, Setting: the City of Kuopio, Finland.
Population-based random sample of 700 persons aged 75 years or over, of whom 601 participated (86%). Only home-dwellers (n = 523) were included in this study.
Alcohol use based on responses to questions concerning quantity and frequency, and CAGE questions. Use of prescription and non-prescription medicines. Mean corpuscular volume.
Of the participants, 44% used alcohol. Most alcohol drinkers used medications on a regular basis (86.9%) or as needed (87.8%), among them medicines known to have some potential interactions with alcohol. Elevated mean corpuscular volume was more widespread among alcohol drinkers than non drinkers.
Theoretical risks posed by alcohol use are not minimal in the older elderly, though the quantity of alcohol use is not considerable. Physicians and nurses should pay attention to chronic diseases and medications when counselling aged people about alcohol consumption. The question of clinical importance of alcohol-medication interactions needs to be studied further.
PubMed ID
16021662 View in PubMed
Less detail

The comparative haematology of cross-bred and indigenous east African goats of Tanzania and breeds reared in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65012
Source
Vet Res Commun. 1992;16(3):221-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
G K Mbassa
J S Poulsen
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Sokoine University of Agriculture, Morogoro, Tanzania.
Source
Vet Res Commun. 1992;16(3):221-9
Date
1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Blood Cell Count - veterinary
Breeding
Comparative Study
Crosses, Genetic
Denmark
Erythrocyte Indices - veterinary
Female
Goats - blood - genetics
Hematocrit - veterinary
Hemoglobins - analysis
Male
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, Animal - blood
Reference Values
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Tanzania
Abstract
Erythrocyte counts, haematocrit, haemoglobin concentration, red blood cell indices, total and differential leukocyte counts were determined in 202 cross-bred and 14 indigenous East African goats aged 6-12 months and also in 59 Norwegian dairy goats, of which 24 were 15-45 days old, 8 were 8 months old and 27 were over 3 years and pregnant. These were reared in Tanzania. Comparisons were made with 24 Dwarf and 57 Danish Landrace goats at 6-12 months of age and 76 adult pregnant Danish Landrace goats reared in Denmark. The purpose was to determine reference ranges for cross-bred and indigenous East African goats and to compare these with those of other breeds. The haemoglobin concentration, haematocrit, erythrocyte and white blood cells were lowest in the Norwegian kids. The highest values were observed in 6-12-month-old goats in all the breeds, whereafter they decreased to relatively constant adult levels. The mean corpuscular volumes were highest in kids followed by adult pregnant Norwegian and Danish Landrace goats, and lowest in 6-12 months old goats. East African and cross-bred goats had the smallest mean corpuscular volumes. The haemoglobin concentration, erythrocyte and leukocyte counts were highest in indigenous East African, followed by young Norwegian and cross-bred goats. The mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration was highest in the cross-breds, while the mean corpuscular haemoglobin was higher in pregnant than in other goats. The age and breed differences were statistically significant.
PubMed ID
1413483 View in PubMed
Less detail

Diagnosing iron deficiency in cyanotic heart disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31078
Source
Indian J Pediatr. 2003 Jan;70(1):29-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2003
Author
Cemile Banu Onur
Tansu Sipahi
Betül Tavil
Selmin Karademir
Aysel Yoney
Author Affiliation
Dr. Sami Ulus Children Hospital, Ankara, Turkey.
Source
Indian J Pediatr. 2003 Jan;70(1):29-31
Date
Jan-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anemia, Iron-Deficiency - blood - etiology
Child, Preschool
Erythrocyte Count
Erythrocyte Indices
Female
Ferritin - blood
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Defects, Congenital - blood - complications
Hematocrit
Hemoglobins - analysis
Humans
Infant
Iron - blood
Male
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To determine the incidence of iron deficiency in children with CCHD by noninvasive, inexpensive and easy laboratory methods. METHODS: Forty four children with cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD), aged 6 to 48 months were included in this study. The patients were categorized as iron deficient (n:28) and iron sufficient group (n:16). Children with CCHD who had iron deficiency were treated with iron for 3 months. RESULT: Iron sufficient patients were followed during 3 months without giving iron preparation. Mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), red cell distribution width (RDW), serum iron (SI), total iron binding capacity (TIBC) and serum ferritin levels were measured in all patients at the beginning and at the end of the study. CONCLUSION: In children with CCHD, hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit (Hct) and red blood cell (RBC) counts were not considered significant parameters in the diagnosis of iron deficiency. Determination of MCV, MCH, RDW values is relatively easy and inexpensive method requiring small amount of blood for the diagnosis of iron deficiency during the follow-up of patients with CCHD.
PubMed ID
12619949 View in PubMed
Less detail

59 records – page 1 of 6.