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Awareness and attitudes related to dental erosive wear among 18-yr-old adolescents in Oslo, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107307
Source
Eur J Oral Sci. 2013 Oct;121(5):471-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Rasa Skudutyte-Rysstad
Aida Mulic
Marit Slåttelid Skeie
Anne B Skaare
Author Affiliation
Department of Cariology and Gerodontology, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Eur J Oral Sci. 2013 Oct;121(5):471-6
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Carbonated Beverages - adverse effects
Dental Enamel - pathology
Female
Food Habits
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Norway
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Tooth Erosion - etiology - pathology
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to describe awareness and attitudes related to dental erosive wear among 18-yr-old adolescents in Oslo and to explore attitudinal differences between participants with and without the condition. All 18-yr-old subjects scheduled for their routine examination at the Public Dental Service clinics during 2008 (n = 3,206) were invited, and 1,456 agreed to participate (a response rate of 45%). The data were collected using structured questionnaires and by clinical examination of the participants. Dental erosive wear was assessed using a pictorial manual - the Visual Erosion Dental Examination scoring system - as a guide. Overall, 88% of participants had heard about dental erosive wear; however, of participants with erosive lesions only 56% were aware of, and only 47% could recall their dentist mentioning, the condition. Participants with erosive wear were more likely to have low or moderate positive attitudes towards acidic drink consumption and to be reluctant to change. In multivariate analyses controlling for gender and behavioural variables, weak or moderate positive awareness of acidic drinks remained significantly associated with higher erosion risk. This study emphasizes the importance of assessment and understanding of awareness and attitudinal aspects in relation to dental erosive wear.
PubMed ID
24028596 View in PubMed
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Dental erosion and soft drink consumption in Swedish children and adolescents and the development of a simplified erosion partial recording system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137205
Source
Swed Dent J. 2010;34(4):187-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Agneta Hasselkvist
Anders Johansson
Ann-Katrin Johansson
Author Affiliation
Public Dental Health, Orebro County Council, Orebro, Sweden. agneta.hasselkvist@orebroll.se
Source
Swed Dent J. 2010;34(4):187-95
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Beverages - adverse effects
Carbonated Beverages - adverse effects
Child
Dental Enamel - pathology
Drinking Behavior
Female
Humans
Male
Mass Screening
Observer Variation
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Tooth Erosion - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The aims of this study were to investigate the prevalence of dental erosion among Swedish children and adolescents and to examine its relation to soft drink consumption. It was hypothesized that the prevalence of dental erosion would be higher in boys than girls,that it would show a correlation with soft drink consumption and that a further simplification ofa previously-used partial recording screening system for dental erosion would have an acceptable sensitivity and specificity. 801 individuals were invited to participate, of whom 609 (75%) accepted. 135 were 5-6 years, 227 were 13-14 years, and 247 were18-19 years old. A questionnaire survey of each individual's soft drink consumption habits, in addition to a clinical examination, were performed. Severe erosion extending into dentine on one or more maxillary anterior teeth/ molars was found to be 13.3% in the 5-6 group, 11.9% in 13-14 group and 22.3% in 18-19 group. The total prevalence for all age groups was 16.4%. The severity of erosion was highest among 18-19 year-old boys, 34.4 % of whom exhibited one or more teeth with severe erosive damage while none of the girls did so. Soft drink consumption was significantly correlated with severity of dental erosion in the 18-19 and 13-14 groups but not in the 5-6 years old group. A simplified erosion partial recording system (SEPRS) using 4 (permanent) or 6 (primary) surfaces as markers showed excellent sensitivity (100%/100%, respectively) and specificity (98%/100%, respectively) in relation to scoring of all maxillary canines/incisors and first permanent/all primary molars. In view of the high prevalence of dental erosion and soft drink consumption among Swedish children and adolescents reported here,there is clearly a need for a national epidemiological registration system as well as for community-based preventive programs to be implemented. The hypothesis that dental erosion would be higher in boys than girls and that it would show a correlation with soft drink intake was confirmed.
PubMed ID
21306084 View in PubMed
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Dental erosion in Icelandic teenagers in relation to dietary and lifestyle factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31061
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2003 Feb;61(1):25-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2003
Author
Inga B Arnadóttir
Sigurdur Rúnar Saemundsson
W Peter Holbrook
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Odontology, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. iarnad@hi.is
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2003 Feb;61(1):25-8
Date
Feb-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Carbonated Beverages - adverse effects
Case-Control Studies
Female
Food Habits
Fruit - adverse effects
Humans
Life Style
Logistic Models
Male
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Saliva - chemistry
Sex Factors
Tooth Erosion - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
High consumption of fruit juices and carbonated drinks has been related to dental erosion. Teenage male Icelanders consume about 800 ml of carbonated drinks per day on average and this corresponds with the main age group and gender of patients seen with erosion. This study examined the prevalence of dental erosion in 15-year-old children in Reykjavík and looked at the association between erosion and some lifestyle factors in a case-control study drawn from the same sample. A 20% sample of the 15-year-cohort population (n = 278) was selected. Dental erosion was classified by location and severity (1 = enamel erosion; 2 = dentine erosion; 3 = severe dentine erosion) and was seen in 21.6% of subjects (68.3% male; 72% scored as grade 1; 23% grade 2; 5% grade 3). Control subjects were the first healthy subjects examined after a case subject had beens diagnosed. In the case-control study, information was gathered by multiple-choice questionnaire on symptoms of gastric reflux, tooth sensitivity, some lifestyle and dietar-factors. Several lifestyle and dietary factors, previously shown to be significantly related to dental caries in Icelandic teenagers, showed no significant relationship to tooth erosion. Although dietary factors are probably important in causing erosion, dietary recall questionnaires did not help in discovering individuals likely to develop erosion.
PubMed ID
12635777 View in PubMed
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Dental erosive wear and salivary flow rate in physically active young adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125878
Source
BMC Oral Health. 2012;12:8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Aida Mulic
Anne Bjørg Tveit
Dag Songe
Hanne Sivertsen
Anne B Skaare
Author Affiliation
Institute of Clinical Dentistry, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. aida.mulic@odont.uio.no
Source
BMC Oral Health. 2012;12:8
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Carbonated Beverages - adverse effects
Case-Control Studies
Chi-Square Distribution
Citrus - adverse effects
Dental Enamel - pathology
Dentin - pathology
Exercise - physiology
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Life Style
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Saliva - secretion
Secretory Rate
Tooth Erosion - epidemiology - etiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Little attention has been directed towards identifying the relationship between physical exercise, dental erosive wear and salivary secretion. The study aimed i) to describe the prevalence and severity of dental erosive wear among a group of physically active young adults, ii) to describe the patterns of dietary consumption and lifestyle among these individuals and iii) to study possible effect of exercise on salivary flow rate.
Young members (age range 18-32 years) of a fitness-centre were invited to participate in the study. Inclusion criteria were healthy young adults training hard at least twice a week. A non-exercising comparison group was selected from an ongoing study among 18-year-olds. Two hundred and twenty participants accepted an intraoral examination and completed a questionnaire. Seventy of the exercising participants provided saliva samples. The examination was performed at the fitness-centre or at a dental clinic (comparison group), using tested erosive wear system (VEDE). Saliva sampling (unstimulated and stimulated) was performed before and after exercise. Occlusal surfaces of the first molars in both jaws and the labial and palatal surfaces of the upper incisors and canines were selected as index teeth.
Dental erosive wear was registered in 64% of the exercising participants, more often in the older age group, and in 20% of the comparison group. Enamel lesions were most observed in the upper central incisors (33%); dentine lesions in lower first molar (27%). One fourth of the participants had erosive wear into dentine, significantly more in males than in females (p = 0.047). More participants with erosive wear had decreased salivary flow during exercise compared with the non-erosion group (p
Notes
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PubMed ID
22443448 View in PubMed
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Dental health behavior, gastroesophageal disorders and dietary habits among Norwegian recruits in 1990 and 1999.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49747
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2003 Apr;61(2):100-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2003
Author
Ståle Myklebust
Ivar Espelid
Sigurd Svalestad
Anne Bjørg Tveit
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Odontology, University of Bergen, Norway. Stale.Myklebust@odont.uib.no
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2003 Apr;61(2):100-4
Date
Apr-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Beverages - adverse effects
Carbonated Beverages - adverse effects
Cariostatic Agents - therapeutic use
Chi-Square Distribution
Citrus sinensis
Drinking
Female
Fluorides - therapeutic use
Food Habits
Fruit - adverse effects
Gastroesophageal Reflux - complications
Health Behavior
Humans
Male
Malus
Military Personnel
Norway
Oral Hygiene
Physical Fitness
Tooth Erosion - etiology
Abstract
A questionnaire was given to representative samples of Norwegian recruits in 1990 and 1999 to explore dental health habits, history of gastroesophageal disorders and diet with possible relations to dental erosion. The samples were 792 (mean age 20.9 years) and 676 (mean age 21.6 years), respectively, and the corresponding responses were 62% and 100%. Minor differences in self-reported dental health habits and gastroesophageal disorders were found. The respondents' dentists had provided information about dental erosion for 8.2% of the respondents in 1990 versus 14.5% in 1999. There was an increase in the reported frequency of daily intake of juice from 17% to 24% (P = 0.006) and carbonated soft drink from 54% to 61% (P = 0.025) in the period 1990-99. The frequency of training activity showed minor changes, but in 1999 it was more common to drink during exercise (94% versus 74% in 1990, P
PubMed ID
12790507 View in PubMed
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Gastric reflux is a significant causative factor of tooth erosion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature88813
Source
J Dent Res. 2009 May;88(5):422-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Holbrook W P
Furuholm J.
Gudmundsson K.
Theodórs A.
Meurman J H
Author Affiliation
University of Iceland, Vatnsmyrarvegi 16, IS 101 Reykjavík, Iceland. phol@hi.is
Source
J Dent Res. 2009 May;88(5):422-6
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Beverages - adverse effects
Buffers
Carbonated Beverages - adverse effects
Child
Dental Enamel - pathology
Dentin - pathology
Drug Therapy
Esophageal pH Monitoring
Female
Food Habits
Fruit
Gastroesophageal Reflux - complications - microbiology
Gastroscopy
Helicobacter Infections - diagnosis
Helicobacter pylori - isolation & purification
Humans
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Male
Manometry
Medical History Taking
Middle Aged
Saliva - physiology - secretion
Secretory Rate - physiology
Tooth Erosion - classification - etiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Dental erosion is caused by dietary or gastric acid. This study aimed to examine the location and severity of tooth erosion with respect to causative factors, and to determine whether the clinical pattern of erosion reflected the dominant etiological factor. The study involved 249 Icelandic individuals and included: a detailed medical history; clinical oral examination; salivary sampling, and analysis for flow rate, pH, and buffering capacity. Reflux was assessed in 91 individuals by gastroscopy, esophageal manometry, and 24-hour esophageal-pH monitoring. Reflux symptoms were reported by 36.5% individuals. Manometry results were abnormal in 8% of study participants, abnormal esophageal pH in 17.7%, and a pathological 24-hour pH recording in 21.3%. 3.6% were positive for Helicobacter pylori. Normal salivary flow was found in 92%, but low salivary buffering (10.4%) was associated with erosion into dentin (P
PubMed ID
19493884 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.