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Adoption of medical devices: perspectives of professionals in Swedish neonatal intensive care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature77842
Source
Technol Health Care. 2007;15(3):157-79
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Roback Kerstin
Gäddlin Per-Olof
Nelson Nina
Persson Jan
Author Affiliation
Center for Medical Technology Assessment, Department of Health and Society, Linköping University, Sweden. kerstin.roback@ihs.liu.se
Source
Technol Health Care. 2007;15(3):157-79
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Diffusion of Innovation
Equipment and Supplies
Female
Humans
Intensive Care, Neonatal
Interviews
Middle Aged
Sweden
Abstract
Advances in biomedical engineering enable us to treat increasingly severe conditions. This implies an increased need for regulation and priority setting in healthcare, to ensure appropriate safety cautions and to avoid accelerating expenditures. This interview study investigates the mechanisms behind the adoption and use of medical devices through the subjective experiences of hospital staff working with devices for neonatal intensive care. The adoption was found to be primarily initiated by vendor activities, but professionals preferably sought information about functionality from close colleagues. Full integration of devices was sometimes not achieved, and even though the adopting units had good introduction routines, there was no systematic follow-up of how adopted devices had been integrated in the work practices. Diffusion variations were, however, mainly found for temporarily tested devices and not for permanently available technologies. Three factors were found to be the major explanatory variables of the adoption of medical devices: (1) the subjective expected value of the device, (2) information and learning, and (3) the innovativeness of the adopting unit.
PubMed ID
17473397 View in PubMed
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Agriculture-related injuries in the parkland region of Manitoba.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214812
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1995 Jul;41:1190-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1995
Author
S K Young
Author Affiliation
Silver Heights Medical Group, Winnipeg.
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1995 Jul;41:1190-7
Date
Jul-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Agriculture - statistics & numerical data
Agrochemicals - adverse effects
Animals
Animals, Domestic
Child
Child, Preschool
Equipment and Supplies - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Male
Manitoba - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - classification - epidemiology - mortality - prevention & control
Retrospective Studies
Seasons
Sex Distribution
Wounds and Injuries - classification - epidemiology - mortality - prevention & control
Abstract
To review a series of farm injuries in the parkland region of Manitoba, compare the collected data to similar studies, and provide a baseline for deriving effective preventive measures for the local community.
Retrospective case study involving review of hospital charts.
The population studied was derived from the catchment area for Dauphin General Hospital, a referral centre servicing an agricultural region of 57,000 people.
Seventy-two patients were admitted to hospital between January 1981 and December 1991 after being injured by agricultural machines, farm animals, herbicides or other chemicals, and fertilizers. Four fatalities were identified through a review of local medical examiner records, for a total of 76 cases.
The following data were abstracted for each case: sex, age, time and date of injury, cause, type of injury, and body part involved.
Most cases involved men, between the ages of 20 and 69, during the afternoon and early evening with a seasonal peak in late summer. More than 60% of injuries were caused by agricultural machinery, followed by animal-related injuries (25%). Grain augers were the most common type of machine causing injury (35%). All patients younger than 9 years were female, and 75% of their injuries involved farm animals. A decreasing annual frequency of farm injuries was noted over the 11-year period. Fewer accidents involving farm machinery appear most responsible for this trend.
Many agriculture-related injuries occur in the parkland region of Manitoba. The type and pattern of injuries observed resembles those documented in other studies. With effective education and preventive measures, most injuries and fatalities could be prevented. Physicians are obliged to encourage and support educational programs in their communities and to review safety practices with patients.
Notes
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1978 Mar 4;118(5):519-22630513
Cites: Pediatrics. 1989 Feb;83(2):267-712913557
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1981 Sep;95(3):312-47271092
Cites: J Occup Med. 1982 Feb;24(2):142-57057283
Cites: J Trauma. 1984 Feb;24(2):150-26694241
Cites: Am J Ind Med. 1990;18(2):179-922206049
Cites: Occup Med. 1991 Jul-Sep;6(3):529-391948533
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Cites: Am Fam Physician. 1988 Oct;38(4):233-443051979
Cites: Pediatrics. 1985 Oct;76(4):562-64047799
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Comment In: Can Fam Physician. 1995 Oct;41:16708829575
Comment In: Can Fam Physician. 1995 Jul;41:1141-527647614
PubMed ID
7647624 View in PubMed
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AIDS and the small city: the cost at Kingston General Hospital.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature232461
Source
CMAJ. 1988 Sep 15;139(6):557-9, 561-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-15-1988
Author
P. Ford
D. Robertson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Queen's University, Ont.
Source
CMAJ. 1988 Sep 15;139(6):557-9, 561-2
Date
Sep-15-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - economics - nursing
Canada
Costs and Cost Analysis
Equipment and Supplies, Hospital - economics - standards
Hospitalization - economics
Hospitals, General - economics
Humans
Laboratories, Hospital - standards
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital - organization & administration
Personnel, Hospital - education
Specimen Handling - standards
Abstract
Although AIDS is often thought of as a "big-city" disease, it is also becoming a serious health care issue for doctors and other health care workers in "small-city" Canada. Kingston, Ont., is one of those small cities, and of the facilities trying to come to grips with a disease about which much remains to be learned. In this article, Drs. Peter Ford and David Robertson outline their hospital's estimate of the cost, in manpower and money, of dealing with the AIDS crisis. The final estimate: roughly $700,000. Although most of the cost will involve one-time capital spending, they point out that there will likely be ongoing labour-related costs because of the special programs and increased manpower needed to deal with AIDS patients. Clearly, AIDS is no longer a big-city disease.
PubMed ID
3409146 View in PubMed
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Source
Sykepleien. 1977 May 20;64(8):460-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-20-1977
Author
O P Grüner
R. Naas
A L Flatmark
B. Fretheim
E. Gjone
Source
Sykepleien. 1977 May 20;64(8):460-2
Date
May-20-1977
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Equipment and Supplies - standards
Evaluation Studies
Humans
Ileostomy
Norway
PubMed ID
586877 View in PubMed
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[Anesthesia and postoperative care--increased need for supplies].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241910
Source
Lakartidningen. 1983 May 11;80(19):2051-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-11-1983

Anesthesia equipment malfunction: origins and clinical recognition.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature247281
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1979 Apr 21;120(8):931-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-21-1979
Author
J W McIntyre
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1979 Apr 21;120(8):931-4
Date
Apr-21-1979
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Anesthesia - adverse effects
Anesthesiology - instrumentation - standards
Canada
Equipment and Supplies - standards
Humans
Hypercapnia - diagnosis - etiology - therapy
Maintenance
Abstract
Equipment malfunction is a problem of particular importance during anesthesia and resuscitation. A review of published reports shows that the most common clinical events involve endotracheal tubes, the inspired oxygen concentration, the volume of inspired anesthetic vapours and gases, and pressures in the breathing or ventilation system. It is concluded that protection of a patient from equipment malfunction depends on: (a) appropriate application of standards set by a national standards association; (b) careful evaluation of equipment prior to purchase; (c) comprehension of equipment function by the user; (d) conscientious routine servicing of all systems concerned with anesthesia and resuscitation, and checking after service and before clinical use; (e) preanesthesia testing of equipment, including the use of an oxygen analyser in the breathing circuit; (f) early inclusion of equipment malfunction in the differential diagnosis of events during anesthesia; and (g) rapid action that cannot present a new hazard to the patient to correct the results of apparatus malfunction.
Notes
Cites: Anaesthesia. 1959 Oct;14:388-9913824011
Cites: Anesthesiology. 1960 May-Jun;21:285-9114443774
Cites: Curr Res Anesth Analg. 1956 Mar-Apr;35(2):137-4013317479
Cites: Br Med J. 1956 Feb 25;1(4964):439-4013284351
Cites: Anesthesiology. 1965 Mar-Apr;26:23514261067
Cites: Anesthesiology. 1964 Nov-Dec;25:86714225991
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Cites: Can Anaesth Soc J. 1957 Apr;4(2):126-3013413710
Cites: Can Anaesth Soc J. 1977 Jul;24(4):522-4268230
Cites: Anesth Analg. 1977 Nov-Dec;56(6):769-74563181
Cites: Br J Anaesth. 1977 Mar;49(3):281-2911582
Cites: Anesthesiology. 1977 Sep;47(3):302-3889120
Cites: Anesthesiology. 1977 Jun;46(6):439860852
Cites: Anesthesiology. 1966 May-Jun;27(3):324-55937173
Cites: Lancet. 1966 Jun 25;1(7452):1400-34160958
Cites: Br J Anaesth. 1973 Nov;45(11):1165-84274481
Cites: Anesth Analg. 1973 Jan-Feb;52(1):48-524567518
Cites: Lancet. 1975 Jun 28;1(7922):141649572
Cites: Anesthesiology. 1974 Jan;40(1):1024520944
Cites: Anesthesiology. 1976 Jul;45(1):102-4132878
Cites: Can Anaesth Soc J. 1974 Sep;21(5):511-34411647
Cites: Can Anaesth Soc J. 1973 Nov;20(6):782-974769612
Cites: Anesthesiology. 1973 Sep;39(3):3554728585
Cites: Anesth Analg. 1973 May-Jun;52(3):376-824735988
Cites: Anesth Analg. 1972 Nov-Dec;51(6):859-624673926
Cites: Anesthesiology. 1973 Apr;38(4):409-104707591
Cites: Anesth Analg. 1972 Sep-Oct;51(5):787-924672173
Cites: Anesthesiology. 1972 Nov;37(5):561-25079308
Cites: Anesth Analg. 1971 Mar-Apr;50(2):195-85279730
Cites: Can Anaesth Soc J. 1976 May;23(3):327-91065466
Cites: Anesthesiology. 1975 May;42(5):633-41055522
Cites: Can Anaesth Soc J. 1976 May;23(3):330-3938971
Cites: Anesthesiology. 1976 Jan;44(1):69-701244781
Cites: Anesthesiology. 1970 Nov;33(5):555-65273703
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Cites: Can Anaesth Soc J. 1975 Mar;22(2):2471125807
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Cites: Anesth Analg. 1969 Jan-Feb;48(1):37-415812556
Cites: Anesthesiology. 1969 Aug;31(2):194-55792812
Cites: Med J Aust. 1969 May 24;1(21):11085792713
Cites: Anesthesiology. 1969 Feb;30(2):246-75765387
Cites: Anesth Analg. 1968 May-Jun;47(3):239-405690095
Cites: Anesth Analg. 1968 May-Jun;47(3):233-75690094
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Cites: Anesthesiology. 1966 Jul-Aug;27(4):513-45946531
Cites: Anesthesiology. 1966 Jul-Aug;27(4):512-35946530
PubMed ID
436069 View in PubMed
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[AN INTUBATION (AIRWAY) TUBE FOR NEWBORN INFANTS.]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61363
Source
Pediatr Akus Ginekol. 1963;27:50-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
1963
Author
N H HULIUK
Source
Pediatr Akus Ginekol. 1963;27:50-1
Date
1963
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asphyxia Neonatorum
Equipment and Supplies
Infant, Newborn
Intubation, Intratracheal
PubMed ID
14107379 View in PubMed
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237 records – page 1 of 24.