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159 records – page 1 of 16.

The accessibility of a new oral motor pacifier to infants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120045
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2012 Dec;76(12):1844-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Marja-Leena Haapanen
Anne Pitkäranta
Author Affiliation
Department of Phoniatrics, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki University, Faculty of Medicine, PO Box 220, FI-00029 Helsinki, Finland. marja-leena.haapanen@hus.fi
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2012 Dec;76(12):1844-8
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Automation - methods
Child, Preschool
Equipment Design
Equipment Safety
Female
Finland
Humans
Infant
Male
Pacifiers
Questionnaires
Sampling Studies
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to examine whether infants would accept an oral motor pacifier (OMP).
Sixteen infants were examined for their immediate acceptance of an OMP. The pacifier was regarded as accepted, if the child took it in the mouth and kept it there actively, i.e. sucked it in one way or other. Their parents were informed verbally and in writing literally about how to offer the OMP to the child and how to use it. The OMP was presented to the child and the child permitted to insert it into her/his mouth by her/himself or if the child failed to do so, the OMP was gently put to the child's mouth. The subjects' reactions were structurally evaluated in terms of 11 statements. The parents of the children received a structured questionnaire with a space for optional free comments and personal opinions.
The median age (6 females, 10 males) was 18 months (mean 19.2 months, s.d. 10.6 and range 2-38 months). The statement scores showed no significant differentiation based on the age of the subject. The parents' reports indicated that 14 (87.5%) of the 18 subjects accepted the OMP, 13 (81.3%) enjoyed watching the pacifier as it was shown to them, and 11 (68.8%) explored it with their fingers while holding it in their hands.
The vast majority of the children accepted the new OMP either at the first trial or after a few trials.
PubMed ID
23044359 View in PubMed
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Advocacy group urges safe injection facilities for Canada's addicts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190446
Source
Lancet. 2002 Apr 20;359(9315):1415
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-20-2002

AIDS threat leads to changes in production of gloves, needles.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228611
Source
CMAJ. 1990 Aug 1;143(3):204
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1-1990

[Air ambulances--a question of medical technological safety].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195886
Source
Lakartidningen. 2000 Dec 13;97(50):5924-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-13-2000
Author
J. Bennis
G. Liedström
Author Affiliation
Anestesikliniken, Sahlgrenska Universitetssjukhuset, Mölndal.
Source
Lakartidningen. 2000 Dec 13;97(50):5924-5
Date
Dec-13-2000
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Ambulances - standards
Equipment Safety
Humans
Sweden
PubMed ID
11188536 View in PubMed
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Anaesthesia equipment safety in Canada: the role of government regulation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220225
Source
Can J Anaesth. 1993 Oct;40(10):987-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1993
Author
I. Gilron
Author Affiliation
Department of Anaesthesia, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec.
Source
Can J Anaesth. 1993 Oct;40(10):987-92
Date
Oct-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anesthesiology - classification - instrumentation - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Canada - epidemiology
Equipment Failure - statistics & numerical data
Equipment Safety - classification - statistics & numerical data
Government Agencies - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Incidence
Product Surveillance, Postmarketing - statistics & numerical data
Public Health Administration - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
Medical device problems as detected by the Health Protection Branch (HPB) of Health and Welfare Canada were studied in order to examine the frequency and safety priority of problems in the subgroup of anaesthesia devices. Data pertaining to the time period from April 1, 1987 to November 30, 1992 were gathered from the Medical Devices Notification Database and the DAFFY Reporting System. The Medical Devices Notification Database contains all notifications for newly marketed medical devices in Canada and the DAFFY Reporting System keeps record of all submitted problem reports and manufacturer recalls along with their designated safety priority status. When an important safety hazard is associated with a medical device as determined from information submitted to HPB, an Alert-Medical Devices may be issued to inform hospitals and health care professionals of the problem. During the studied time period, the percentages of problem reports and recalls as well as Alerts were compared with the percentage of newly marketed anaesthesia devices. It was found that although only 2.3% of the newly marketed medical devices were classified as anaesthesia devices, 8.6% of all problem reports/recalls and 37.5% of all Alerts originated from the field of anaesthesia devices. Comparison of the percentages of problem reports/recalls (8.6%) and Alerts (37.5%) with the percentage of marketed devices for anaesthesia (2.3%) showed differences (P
Notes
Comment In: Can J Anaesth. 1993 Oct;40(10):911-48222028
PubMed ID
8222041 View in PubMed
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Analyzing pacemaker leads: application of a form of energy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196816
Source
Can Oper Room Nurs J. 2000 Mar;18(1):30-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2000
Author
M. Menard
J. Tyndall
Author Affiliation
Surgical Program, Hamilton Health Sciences Corporation, Ontario.
Source
Can Oper Room Nurs J. 2000 Mar;18(1):30-1
Date
Mar-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Certification - legislation & jurisprudence
Electrocardiography - nursing
Equipment Safety
Humans
Job Description
Nursing Assessment
Ontario
Operating Room Nursing - education - legislation & jurisprudence
Pacemaker, Artificial - standards
Professional Autonomy
Abstract
In the province of Ontario, analyzing of pacemaker leads is a delegated controlled act. This article describes the certification/recertification process for analyzing of pacemaker leads at the Hamilton Health Sciences Corporation.
PubMed ID
11051892 View in PubMed
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An assessment of the effectiveness of the revised FDA checklist.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5512
Source
AANA J. 1996 Jun;64(3):277-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1996
Author
R. Manley
J D Cuddeford
Author Affiliation
Alaska Native Medical Center, Anchorage, USA.
Source
AANA J. 1996 Jun;64(3):277-82
Date
Jun-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anesthesiology - instrumentation - standards
Equipment Failure
Equipment Safety
Guidelines
Humans
Nurse Anesthetists
United States
United States Food and Drug Administration
Abstract
In 1978, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), developed a generic anesthesia equipment preuse checklist. The checklist was first released by the FDA in August 1986 and endorsed by the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists on October 18, 1986. The FDA checklist was revised in 1992 to improve the abilities of anesthesia providers to detect machine faults. In the present study, the investigators attempted to determine the effectiveness of the revised FDA checklist in detection of anesthesia machine faults as compared to providers' usual methods. Whereas no published study of preanesthesia safety inspection had been performed since the revision of the FDA checklist, the authors compared the detection abilities of anesthesia providers before and after inclusion of the revised FDA checklist. Twenty-two anesthesia providers were tested to compare the number of prearranged anesthesia machine faults that could be detected with (1) their usual checkout methods, and (2) with the revised FDA checklist. Data describing the subjects' fault detection abilities were analyzed using the t test for paired observation (P value
PubMed ID
9095699 View in PubMed
Less detail

An effective prevention program to reduce electrical burn injuries caused by the use of multimeters.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145236
Source
J Burn Care Res. 2010 Mar-Apr;31(2):333-40
Publication Type
Article
Author
Peter A Marcucci
Steve Smith
Manuel Gomez
Joel S Fish
Author Affiliation
Electrical Safety Authority, Department of Regulatory Affairs, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Burn Care Res. 2010 Mar-Apr;31(2):333-40
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational - prevention & control
Burns, Electric - epidemiology - prevention & control
Electric Power Supplies - standards
Equipment Safety
Humans
Ontario - epidemiology
Primary Prevention
Questionnaires
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to determine the circumstances of electrical burn injuries caused by the use of multimeters among electricians and electrical apprentices in Ontario and to develop a burn prevention program to reduce them. A survey to investigate electrical injuries caused by multimeters was mailed in June 2004 to 5000 Ontario electricians and electrical apprentices. A high voltage laboratory tested the effectiveness of fused leads to reduce multimeters malfunction. The results of the survey and laboratory tests helped to implement a burn prevention program. Then, a mail fused leads multimeter exchange program was implemented, and proposals to improve the multimeters standard were made to the Canadian Standards Association. Nine hundred (18%) workers responded the survey. There were 801 (89%) electricians, 81 (9%) electrical apprentices, and 27 (3%) with other qualifications. Ninety-nine (11%) had a multimeter fail during use, and half of them suffered critical burns. Causes of the injury were operator error (59%), wrong category rating (21%), defective equipment (18%), and others (2%). More than 2000 electrical contractors acquired the new fused leads multimeters. There were no critical injuries caused by multimeters in the years 2006, 2007, and 2008 (January to August) in Ontario. Understanding the cause of electrical burn injuries by multimeters and engaging members of the integrated electrical safety system in a multifaceted prevention program were effective in reducing electrical burn injuries. Fused leads multimeters proved to be effective in preventing most common user errors and electrical burn injuries caused by multimeters.
PubMed ID
20182365 View in PubMed
Less detail

An exploratory study of whole-body vibration exposure and dose while operating heavy equipment in the construction industry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182881
Source
Appl Occup Environ Hyg. 2003 Dec;18(12):999-1005
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
Adam P Cann
Alan W Salmoni
Peter Vi
Tammy R Eger
Author Affiliation
Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Appl Occup Environ Hyg. 2003 Dec;18(12):999-1005
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Construction Materials
Equipment Safety - standards
Humans
Industry
Male
Maximum Allowable Concentration
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Ontario
Vibration - adverse effects
Abstract
Whole-body vibration measurements were recorded for various types of heavy equipment used within the construction industry. The purpose of these measurements was to provide more information about the potential levels of whole-body vibration experienced by equipment operators in the construction industry, as well as to identify types of equipment warranting further research. In total, 67 pieces of equipment were tested from 14 different equipment types. Testing took place at various construction sites including corporate, public, and residential work projects. Measurements were made (following the 1997 International Standards Organization's 2631-1 whole-body vibration standards) for 20-minute testing periods using a Larson Davis HVM100 vibration monitor and a triaxial accelerometer. The mobile equipment tested was associated with greater levels of whole-body vibration than the stationary equipment. When whole-body vibration levels were compared to the International Standards Organization's 2631-1 standards, wheel loaders, off-road dump trucks, scrapers, skid steer vehicles, backhoes, bulldozers, crawler loaders, and concrete trowel vehicles exceeded the recommendations based on measured vibration dose values. Further research incorporating larger sample sizes and controlled testing conditions is required to better understand the levels of exposure experienced by operators as well as the amount to which seating, terrain, mobility, and vehicle structure might affect whole-body vibration.
PubMed ID
14612296 View in PubMed
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159 records – page 1 of 16.