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An outbreak of hepatitis B associated with reusable subdermal electroencephalogram electrodes. Hepatitis B Outbreak Investigation Team.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198742
Source
CMAJ. 2000 Apr 18;162(8):1127-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-18-2000
Source
CMAJ. 2000 Apr 18;162(8):1127-31
Date
Apr-18-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cross Infection - epidemiology - transmission
Disease Outbreaks
Electrodes
Electroencephalography - instrumentation
Equipment Reuse
Hepatitis B - epidemiology - transmission
Hepatitis B virus - isolation & purification
Humans
Ontario - epidemiology
Abstract
In early 1996 an outbreak of hepatitis B was detected among patients who attended an electroencephalogram (EEG) clinic in Toronto operated by a neurologist. In this article we report the results of an investigation conducted to determine the extent and source of the outbreak.
Notifications were sent to 18 567 patients who had attended any of 6 EEG clinics operated by the neurologist between 1990 and 1996 asking them to see their physician to be tested for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection; 2957 envelopes were returned. Of the remaining 15 610 patients, results of laboratory tests were available for 10 244 (65.6%). A detailed follow-up of patients with newly acquired hepatitis B and those with chronic infection (carriers) was conducted. Viral DNA sequencing was used to compare strains of available HBV isolates.
A total of 75 patients were identified in whom hepatitis B developed between 1991 and 1996; all of them had had at least one EEG performed in which reusable subdermal electrodes had been used. No cases were detected among patients who participated only in sleep studies, for which disk electrodes had been used. The peak rate of HBV infection (18.2 cases per 1000 person-EEGs) occurred in 1995. One technician performed all of the EEGs at the clinics and was found to be positive for hepatitis B e antigen. DNA sequencing confirmed that the virus isolated from the technician was identical to the virus isolated in 4 cases of hepatitis B tested. Infection control procedures were found to be inadequate.
The hepatitis B outbreak was a result of a common source of infection, the technologist, and inadequate infection control practices. Reusable subdermal EEG electrodes were the likely vehicles of transmission. Health care workers should follow recommended infection control practices and be vaccinated against hepatitis B.
Notes
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PubMed ID
10789626 View in PubMed
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Are intraaortic balloons suitable for reuse? A survey study of 112 used intraaortic balloons.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209468
Source
Artif Organs. 1997 Feb;21(2):121-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1997
Author
M. Yang
X. Deng
Z. Zhang
M. Julien
F. Pelletier
D. Desaulniers
R. Cossette
F J Teijeira
G. Laroche
R. Guidoin
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Laval University, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Artif Organs. 1997 Feb;21(2):121-30
Date
Feb-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Calibration
Calorimetry, Differential Scanning
Catheterization
Data Collection
Equipment Reuse - standards
Humans
Intra-Aortic Balloon Pumping - standards - trends
Longitudinal Studies
Microscopy, Electron, Scanning
Polyurethanes - chemistry
Quebec
Spectrophotometry, Infrared
Surface Properties
Tensile Strength
Abstract
To assess the safety of reusing single-use intraaortic balloon devices (IABs), 112 used devices were investigated in terms of physical integrity, gas leakage inspection, mechanical performance, surface chemistry and morphology, and physical stability. These IABs were all used clinically only once, and the duration of the IABs in vivo ranged from 6 to 312 h. Macroscopic examination of the balloons and the outer catheters revealed no obvious change in either shape or color. No discernible abrasions or cracks were observed on the balloons. However, 61% of the balloons were creased, and 40% of the central lumens and 21% of the sheaths showed visible bending flaws. Moreover, 65% of the balloons and 38% of the central lumens were contaminated by visible residual organic debris. The physical integrity of each device was verified in a specially designed leakage-fatigue tester for 72 h. Ninety-seven percent of the devices passed the leakage inspection. Stress-strain testing, differential scanning calorimetry, attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared, and scanning electron microscopy analyses clearly indicated that there were no significant differences in the mechanical properties, bulk material morphology, surface chemistry, and external surface morphology between the used balloons and virgin controls. Although some surface modifications occurred on the internal side of the balloons, the external surfaces of most balloons suffered no trauma. Most of the used IABs examined in this study maintained physical and mechanical properties similar to those of the virgin devices. The chemistry of the balloon material was stable after short-term in vivo use. However, it does not seem possible to establish a rigorous protocol of cleaning, sterilization, and inspection to guarantee a safer reuse of these devices. The presence of residual organic debris that cannot be eliminated results in an imperative preclusion not to reuse the IABs.
Notes
Erratum In: Artif Organs 1998 Jan;22(1):96
PubMed ID
9028494 View in PubMed
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Cleaning and disinfection of reusable items in Swedish hospitals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217407
Source
Todays OR Nurse. 1994 Sep-Oct;16(5):20-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
B. Fryklund
M. Marland
Source
Todays OR Nurse. 1994 Sep-Oct;16(5):20-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cross Infection - prevention & control
Disinfection
Equipment Reuse
Equipment and Supplies, Hospital - standards
Humans
Sweden
Abstract
1. In Sweden, every ward has one or two utility rooms equipped with a washer disinfector for cleaning and disinfection of such items as instruments and wash basins, and a flusher disinfector for cleaning and disinfection of bedpans/urinals and emptying of fluids. 2. Thermal disinfection of reusable items is accomplished in a sealed chamber with an efficient, controlled process--which is a simple, inexpensive, and reliable method for high-level disinfection. 3. The use of flusher and washer disinfectors in hospital wards, surgery areas, and critical care units is recommended to minimize the use of single-use items and provide a safer environment for patients and personnel.
PubMed ID
7974645 View in PubMed
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Code Grey: Stained Surgical Instruments and Their Impact on One Canadian Health Authority.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292585
Source
Healthc Q. 2017; 20(3):65-68
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2017
Author
Rob Kean
Ron Johnson
Michael Doyle
Author Affiliation
Policy, planning, and research analyst at Eastern Health. He has worked in the field of applied health research for the past nine years, helping managers and decision-makers to optimize the delivery of healthcare services in Newfoundland and Labrador.
Source
Healthc Q. 2017; 20(3):65-68
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Equipment Contamination - prevention & control
Equipment Reuse
Minerals
Newfoundland and Labrador
Sterilization - economics - methods - standards
Surgical Instruments - economics - standards - supply & distribution
Water supply
Abstract
In 2016, NL's largest RHA was faced with serious challenges stemming from the discovery of stained surgical instruments at its two largest hospitals. This discovery prompted a series of postponed surgeries, an extensive internal mobilization of labour and the purchase of millions of dollars of new equipment. In tackling these challenges, the organization not only acquired a better understanding of its surgical tools, but it also gained renewed appreciation for the resilience of its human resources. By describing this incident and the lessons learned, we hope to offer insight to providers in similar circumstances.
PubMed ID
29132453 View in PubMed
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Comparative cost-efficiency of the EVOTECH endoscope cleaner and reprocessor versus manual cleaning plus automated endoscope reprocessing in a real-world Canadian hospital endoscopy setting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130791
Source
BMC Gastroenterol. 2011;11:105
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Lindy Forte
Cynthia Shum
Author Affiliation
VALORE Research, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. lindy.forte@sympatico.ca
Source
BMC Gastroenterol. 2011;11:105
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Automation
Canada
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Cross Infection - prevention & control
Disinfection - economics - methods
Endoscopes
Equipment Reuse
Humans
Time and Motion Studies
Abstract
Reprocessing of endoscopes generally requires labour-intensive manual cleaning followed by high-level disinfection in an automated endoscope reprocessor (AER). EVOTECH Endoscope Cleaner and Reprocessor (ECR) is approved for fully automated cleaning and disinfection whereas AERs require manual cleaning prior to the high-level disinfection procedure. The purpose of this economic evaluation was to determine the cost-efficiency of the ECR versus AER methods of endoscopy reprocessing in an actual practice setting.
A time and motion study was conducted at a Canadian hospital to collect data on the personnel resources and consumable supplies costs associated with the use of EVOTECH ECR versus manual cleaning followed by AER with Medivators DSD-201. Reprocessing of all endoscopes was observed and timed for both reprocessor types over three days. Laboratory staff members were interviewed regarding the consumption and cost of all disposable supplies and equipment. Exact Wilcoxon rank sum test was used for assessing differences in total cycle reprocessing time.
Endoscope reprocessing was significantly shorter with the ECR than with manual cleaning followed by AER. The differences in median time were 12.46 minutes per colonoscope (p
Notes
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Cites: BMC Infect Dis. 2010;10:20020618935
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1997 Dec 18;337(25):1848-99411262
PubMed ID
21967345 View in PubMed
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A cost analysis of reusable and disposable flexible optical scopes for intubation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126936
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2012 May;56(5):577-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
M F Tvede
M S Kristensen
M. Nyhus-Andreasen
Author Affiliation
Department of Anaesthesia and Operating Theatre Services, Center of Head and Orthopaedics, Copenhagen University Hospital Rigshospitalet, Denmark. michael.friis.tvede@rh.regionh.dk
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2012 May;56(5):577-84
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anesthesia, Inhalation
Costs and Cost Analysis
Databases, Factual
Denmark
Disposable Equipment - economics
Equipment Reuse - economics
Fiber Optic Technology
Humans
Intubation, Intratracheal - economics - instrumentation
Laryngoscopes - economics
Personnel, Hospital - economics
Retrospective Studies
Sterilization - economics
Abstract
Intubation using a flexible optical scope (FOS) is a cornerstone technique for managing the predicted and unpredicted difficult airway. The term FOS covers both fibre-optic scopes and videoscopes. The total costs of using flexible scopes for intubation are unknown. The recent introduction of a disposable flexible scope for intubation merits closer scrutiny of the total costs associated with both modalities.
The costs incurred during intubations using FOSs at a large anaesthesia department were identified, and a series of intubations using a disposable scope were analyzed for comparison. Recognized health-economic methodology was applied.
During a 1-year period, 360 FOS intubations were performed. In this clinical setting, the average cost of an intubation using a reusable FOS was €177.7. When using the disposable Ambu(®) aScope (Ambu A/S, Ballerup, Denmark), the cost was €204.4. The break-even point, i.e. the number of intubations per month where the cost of using disposable and non-disposable equipment is identical, was 22.5/month. A subgroup analysis looking solely at intubations performed with flexible videoscopes revealed that the cost per intubation was equal for disposable and reusable videoscopes.
At our institution, the total cost of an intubation is greater when using disposable compared with reusable equipment (€204.4 vs. €177.7). If video equipment with an external monitor is considered mandatory, the expenses are of equal magnitude. The cost analysis is particularly sensitive to the actual number of flexible optic intubations performed; with fewer intubations, the total cost will begin to favour disposable equipment.
PubMed ID
22338623 View in PubMed
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Economic analysis of reprocessing single-use medical devices: a systematic literature review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157308
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2008 Apr;29(4):297-301
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Philip Jacobs
Julie Polisena
David Hailey
Susan Lafferty
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. pjacobs@ihe.ca
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2008 Apr;29(4):297-301
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Cross Infection - transmission
Disposable Equipment - economics - standards
Equipment Reuse - economics
Health Care Costs
Humans
Infection Control - economics
Sterilization - economics
Abstract
Although an increasing number of medical devices are labeled "for single use only," cleaning and reuse of single-use medical devices continues, because of the economic incentive. We conducted a survey of the economic literature to obtain the current evidence available and to assess the costs and benefits of reusing single-use medical devices.
A comprehensive literature search was carried out to identify articles that compared single use and reuse of single-use medical devices and that met specific scientific criteria, including evaluation of economic outcomes. Each selected article was independently reviewed by 2 reviewers to extract cost and clinical outcome data and to assess the quality of the study.
Nine published articles met the selection criteria. The savings were about 49% of the direct cost. These savings would be offset by adverse-event costs, but none were detected. However, quality of the studies was generally poor.
There is little available evidence of quality in the published literature to assess the practice of reuse of single-use medical devices. Moreover, data on clinical outcomes are missing and, where available, cannot be attributed specifically to the reuse of single-use medical devices.
PubMed ID
18462140 View in PubMed
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46 records – page 1 of 5.