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The 6-F nitinol TrapEase inferior vena cava filter: results of a prospective multicenter trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195125
Source
J Vasc Interv Radiol. 2001 Mar;12(3):299-304
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2001
Author
H. Rousseau
P. Perreault
P. Otal
L. Stockx
J. Golzarian
V. Oliva
P. Reynaud
F. Raat
F. Szatmari
G. Santoro
G. Emanuelli
M. Nonent
Y. Hoogeveen
Author Affiliation
Radiology Department, CHU Rangueil, Toulouse, France. rousseau.h@chu-toulouse.fr
Source
J Vasc Interv Radiol. 2001 Mar;12(3):299-304
Date
Mar-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alloys
Canada
Equipment Design
Europe
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Prospective Studies
Pulmonary Embolism - prevention & control
Risk
Time Factors
Vena Cava Filters - adverse effects
Venous Thrombosis - epidemiology
Abstract
The authors report the first results of a new 6-F symmetrically designed permanent nitinol inferior vena cava (IVC) filter, the Cordis TrapEase, evaluated in a multicenter prospective study with 6-months of follow-up.
A total of 65 patients (29 men, 36 women) who ranged in age from 37 to 96 years (mean age, 68 years) and who were at high risk of pulmonary embolism (PE) were enrolled in 12 centers in Europe and Canada. The study was approved by the institutional review boards at all centers. Study objectives were to evaluate filter effectiveness, filter stability, and caval occlusion. Indications for filter placement were deep vein thrombosis with recurrent thromboembolism and/or free-floating thrombus with contraindication to anticoagulation in 37 patients, and complications in achieving adequate anticoagulation in 28 patients. Follow-up included clinical examination, plain film, Doppler ultrasound, CT scan, and nuclear medicine.
The analysis of the data revealed a technical success of 95.4% (three filter-system related implantations not at the intended site, no events of filter tilting) and a clinical success of 100% at 6 months (no cases of symptomatic PE), the study primary endpoint. There were no cases (0%) of filter migration, insertion site thrombosis, filter fracture, or vessel wall perforation. During the study period, there were two cases of filter thrombosis: one case of early symptomatic thrombosis that was successfully treated in the hospital, and one case of nonsymptomatic filter thrombosis detected at 1-month follow-up, with spontaneous recanalization at 3 months. In the latter patient, some residual thrombus was still detected at 6 months. Of the study population of 65 patients, there were 23 deaths. These deaths were not related to the device or the implantation procedure but to the underlying disease process.
This study demonstrates the new nitinol permanent IVC filter to be a safe and an effective device, with a low overall complication rate, for use in patients with thromboembolic disease at high risk of PE.
PubMed ID
11287505 View in PubMed
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The accessibility of a new oral motor pacifier to infants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120045
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2012 Dec;76(12):1844-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Marja-Leena Haapanen
Anne Pitkäranta
Author Affiliation
Department of Phoniatrics, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki University, Faculty of Medicine, PO Box 220, FI-00029 Helsinki, Finland. marja-leena.haapanen@hus.fi
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2012 Dec;76(12):1844-8
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Automation - methods
Child, Preschool
Equipment Design
Equipment Safety
Female
Finland
Humans
Infant
Male
Pacifiers
Questionnaires
Sampling Studies
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to examine whether infants would accept an oral motor pacifier (OMP).
Sixteen infants were examined for their immediate acceptance of an OMP. The pacifier was regarded as accepted, if the child took it in the mouth and kept it there actively, i.e. sucked it in one way or other. Their parents were informed verbally and in writing literally about how to offer the OMP to the child and how to use it. The OMP was presented to the child and the child permitted to insert it into her/his mouth by her/himself or if the child failed to do so, the OMP was gently put to the child's mouth. The subjects' reactions were structurally evaluated in terms of 11 statements. The parents of the children received a structured questionnaire with a space for optional free comments and personal opinions.
The median age (6 females, 10 males) was 18 months (mean 19.2 months, s.d. 10.6 and range 2-38 months). The statement scores showed no significant differentiation based on the age of the subject. The parents' reports indicated that 14 (87.5%) of the 18 subjects accepted the OMP, 13 (81.3%) enjoyed watching the pacifier as it was shown to them, and 11 (68.8%) explored it with their fingers while holding it in their hands.
The vast majority of the children accepted the new OMP either at the first trial or after a few trials.
PubMed ID
23044359 View in PubMed
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Acoustically invisible feeding blue whales in Northern Icelandic waters.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267088
Source
J Acoust Soc Am. 2014 Aug;136(2):939-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Tomonari Akamatsu
Marianne Helene Rasmussen
Maria Iversen
Source
J Acoust Soc Am. 2014 Aug;136(2):939-44
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acoustics - instrumentation
Animals
Balaenoptera - physiology - psychology
Equipment Design
Feeding Behavior
Iceland
Oceans and Seas
Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted
Sound Spectrography
Time Factors
Transducers, Pressure
Vocalization, Animal
Abstract
Fixed passive acoustic monitoring can be used for long-term recording of vocalizing cetaceans. Both presence monitoring and animal density estimation requires the call rates and sound source levels of vocalizations produced by single animals. In this study, blue whale calls were recorded using acoustic bio-logging systems in Skjálfandi Bay off Húsavík, Northeast Iceland, in June 2012. An accelerometer was attached to individual whales to monitor diving behavior. During 21?h recording two individuals, 8?h 45?min and 13?h 2?min, respectively, 105 and 104 lunge feeding events and four calls were recorded. All recorded calls were down-sweep calls ranging from 105 to 48?Hz. The sound duration was 1-2?s. The source level was estimated to be between 158 and 169?dB re 1µPa rms, assuming spherical sound propagation from the possible sound source location to the tag. The observed sound production rates and source levels of individual blue whales during feeding were extremely small compared with those observed previously in breeding grounds. The feeding whales were nearly acoustically invisible. The function of calls during feeding remains unknown.
PubMed ID
25096128 View in PubMed
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Acoustic vector sensor beamforming reduces masking from underwater industrial noise during passive monitoring.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289559
Source
J Acoust Soc Am. 2016 04; 139(4):EL105
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-2016
Author
Aaron M Thode
Katherine H Kim
Robert G Norman
Susanna B Blackwell
Charles R Greene
Author Affiliation
Marine Physical Laboratory, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, San Diego, California 92093-0205, USA athode@ucsd.edu.
Source
J Acoust Soc Am. 2016 04; 139(4):EL105
Date
04-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Acoustics - instrumentation
Animals
Environmental Monitoring - instrumentation - methods
Equipment Design
Models, Theoretical
Motion
Noise - adverse effects
Oceans and Seas
Oil and Gas Industry
Pressure
Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted
Signal-To-Noise Ratio
Sound Spectrography
Time Factors
Transducers, Pressure
Vocalization, Animal
Water
Abstract
Masking from industrial noise can hamper the ability to detect marine mammal sounds near industrial operations, whenever conventional (pressure sensor) hydrophones are used for passive acoustic monitoring. Using data collected from an autonomous recorder with directional capabilities (Directional Autonomous Seafloor Acoustic Recorder), deployed 4.1?km from an arctic drilling site in 2012, the authors demonstrate how conventional beamforming on an acoustic vector sensor can be used to suppress noise arriving from a narrow sector of geographic azimuths. Improvements in signal-to-noise ratio of up to 15?dB are demonstrated on bowhead whale calls, which were otherwise undetectable using conventional hydrophones.
PubMed ID
27106345 View in PubMed
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Acoustic vector sensor beamforming reduces masking from underwater industrial noise during passive monitoring.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289717
Source
J Acoust Soc Am. 2016 04; 139(4):EL105
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-2016
Author
Aaron M Thode
Katherine H Kim
Robert G Norman
Susanna B Blackwell
Charles R Greene
Author Affiliation
Marine Physical Laboratory, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, San Diego, California 92093-0205, USA athode@ucsd.edu.
Source
J Acoust Soc Am. 2016 04; 139(4):EL105
Date
04-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Acoustics - instrumentation
Animals
Environmental Monitoring - instrumentation - methods
Equipment Design
Models, Theoretical
Motion
Noise - adverse effects
Oceans and Seas
Oil and Gas Industry
Pressure
Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted
Signal-To-Noise Ratio
Sound Spectrography
Time Factors
Transducers, Pressure
Vocalization, Animal
Water
Abstract
Masking from industrial noise can hamper the ability to detect marine mammal sounds near industrial operations, whenever conventional (pressure sensor) hydrophones are used for passive acoustic monitoring. Using data collected from an autonomous recorder with directional capabilities (Directional Autonomous Seafloor Acoustic Recorder), deployed 4.1?km from an arctic drilling site in 2012, the authors demonstrate how conventional beamforming on an acoustic vector sensor can be used to suppress noise arriving from a narrow sector of geographic azimuths. Improvements in signal-to-noise ratio of up to 15?dB are demonstrated on bowhead whale calls, which were otherwise undetectable using conventional hydrophones.
PubMed ID
27106345 View in PubMed
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Adaptation of a seated postural control measure for adult wheelchair users.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173363
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2005 Aug 19;27(16):951-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-19-2005
Author
Brigitte Gagnon
Claude Vincent
Luc Noreau
Author Affiliation
Rehabilitation Department, Faculty of Medicine, Laval University, Quebec City, Canada. claude.vincent@rea.ulaval.ca
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2005 Aug 19;27(16):951-9
Date
Aug-19-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Biomechanical Phenomena
Disabled Persons - rehabilitation
Equipment Design - standards
Humans
Mechanics
Posture - physiology
Quality of Life
Quebec
Wheelchairs - standards
Abstract
Clinical measures of seated postural control in adults are not standardized and most are derived from in-house tools. The purpose of this study is to adapt a pediatric instrument to evaluate seated postural control in adult wheelchair users.
The new instrument is called the Seated Postural Control Measure for Adults (SPCMA) 1.0. Five preliminary versions were pretested with some 20 adults by two raters and a group of experts.
This instrument comprises three sections: Section 1, level of sitting scale for adults (1 item, 7-point ordinal scale); Section 2, static postural alignment (22 items, 7-point ordinal scale); and Section 3, postural alignment after a dynamic activity, propulsion of the wheelchair on flat terrain and an incline (22 items, 7-point ordinal scale).
The SPCMA for Adults 1.0 improves the quality and uniformity of evaluations done by different raters, which facilitates more rigorous follow-up of clients over time, communication between professionals, and objective verification of the attainment of intervention objectives.
PubMed ID
16096248 View in PubMed
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The adoption of nickel-titanium rotary instrumentation increases root-filling quality amongst a group of Swedish general dental practitioners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272669
Source
Swed Dent J. 2014;38(1):15-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Helena Göransson
Anders Molander
Jörgen Karlsson
Leif Jansson
Claes Reit
Source
Swed Dent J. 2014;38(1):15-22
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Dental Alloys
Dental Instruments
Equipment Design
General Practice, Dental - instrumentation - standards
Humans
Nickel - chemistry
Public Health Dentistry
Root Canal Preparation - instrumentation - methods
Sweden
Titanium - chemistry
Abstract
The aim of the present study was testing the hypothesis that the adoption of nickel-titanium rotary instrumentation (NTRI) will improve the technical quality of root-fillings. The investigation was carried out within a mandatory continuing education program (CEP) for general dental practitioners (GDPs). The study was conducted amongst GDPs employed by the Public Dental Health Service in the County of Stockholm. Identical questionnaires were distributed before the CEP (Pre-Q) and 9 to 12 months after the course (Post-Q). The CEP consisted of two parts: lectures and hands-on training. From each GDP, radiographs of two cases completed before the course and two cases treated 9-12 months after the course were randomly selected. Primarily molars were selected for evaluation. The radiographs were individually evaluated by two endodontists. Teeth treated before and after training were presented in random order. Adoption rate of NTRI increased from 35% to 75%. Cases from 124 GDPs were included in the final analysis. The rate of good quality root-fillings increased from 27% to 49% (p
PubMed ID
26995807 View in PubMed
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Advancement of the artificial pancreas through the development of interoperability standards.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108263
Source
J Diabetes Sci Technol. 2013 Jul;7(4):1066-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Peter E Picton
Melanie Yeung
Nathaniel Hamming
Lane Desborough
Eyal Dassau
Joseph A Cafazzo
Author Affiliation
Centre for Global eHealth Innovation, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. peter.picton@uhn.ca
Source
J Diabetes Sci Technol. 2013 Jul;7(4):1066-70
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Community Networks
Computer Communication Networks - standards
Congresses as topic
Diabetes Mellitus - surgery
Endocrine Surgical Procedures - standards
Equipment Design - standards
Humans
Pancreas, Artificial - standards
Research
Systems Integration
Abstract
Despite advancements in the development of the artificial pancreas, barriers in the form of proprietary data and communication protocols of diabetes devices have made the integration of these components challenging. The Artificial Pancreas Standards and Technical Platform Project is an initiative funded by the JDRF Canadian Clinical Trial Network with the goal of developing device communication standards for the interoperability of diabetes devices. Stakeholders from academia, industry, regulatory agencies, and medical and patient communities have been engaged in advancing this effort. In this article, we describe this initiative along with the process involved in working with the standards organizations and stakeholders that are key to ensuring effective standards are developed and adopted. Discussion from a special session of the 12th Annual Diabetes Technology Meeting is also provided.
Notes
Cites: Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc. 2007;2007:6175-718003430
Cites: Hypertension. 2012 Jul;60(1):51-722615116
Cites: J Med Internet Res. 2012;14(1):e3122356799
Cites: JAMA. 2005 Jul 27;294(4):490-216046656
Cites: IEEE Trans Inf Technol Biomed. 2008 Jul;12(4):470-918632327
Cites: Radiology. 2005 Aug;236(2):382-516040896
Cites: J Med Internet Res. 2012;14(3):e7022564332
PubMed ID
23911190 View in PubMed
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Adverse reactions associated with respirator fit testing of healthcare workers in British Columbia, Canada: a review of compensation claim cases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157374
Source
Arch Environ Occup Health. 2007;62(4):197-200
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Sami Youakim
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. syouakim@telusplanet.net
Source
Arch Environ Occup Health. 2007;62(4):197-200
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational - statistics & numerical data
Adult
British Columbia
Equipment Design
Female
Health Personnel
Humans
Male
Materials Testing
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Occupational Health
Quaternary Ammonium Compounds - adverse effects - immunology
Respiratory Protective Devices
Retrospective Studies
Workers' Compensation
Abstract
Thousands of healthcare workers in British Columbia are being fit tested for respirator use as a part of respiratory protection programs emanating from the SARS outbreak in 2003. The author reviews 8 claims submitted to the Workers' Compensation Board of British Columbia for adverse reactions related to denatonium benzoate fit testing. The adverse effects varied in severity. Most claims involved respiratory symptoms and 3 dermatitis or angioedema symptoms. One asthmatic required hospitalization for a severe asthmatic reaction. These cases indicate that there may be potentially significant health risks associated with denatonium benzoate-based fit testing at least for a small group of susceptible individuals. More systematic research is required.
PubMed ID
18458024 View in PubMed
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575 records – page 1 of 58.