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26 records – page 1 of 3.

Age, sleep and irregular workhours: A field study with electroencephalographic recordings, catecholamine excretion and self-ratings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99134
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1981 Sep;7(3):196-203
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1981
Author
L. Torsvall
T. Akerstedt
M. Gillberg
Author Affiliation
The Laboratory for Clinical Stress Research, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1981 Sep;7(3):196-203
Date
Sep-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Catecholamines - urine
Epinephrine - urine
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norepinephrine - urine
Polysomnography
Sleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythm - diagnosis - physiopathology
Sleep Stages
Sweden
Work Schedule Tolerance - physiology
Abstract
Day sleep (after night work) and night sleep (after day work) were studied in two groups of locomotive engineers aged 25-35 and 50-60 a, respectively. All recordings were made in the homes of the subjects. For both groups day sleep was reduced by approximately 3.3 h, mainly affecting rapid eye movement sleep and stage 2 sleep. Diuresis and the excretion of noradrenaline were increased during day sleep. The ratings of sleepiness were higher after night work than after day work. Several indices of disturbed daytime sleep correlated significantly with catecholamine excretion. The age groups differed mainly in that the older subjects had relatively more stage shifts, awakenings, stage 1 sleep, a higher diuresis, and a higher noradrenaline excretion during day sleep. It was concluded that night work is detrimental to sleep and that negative effects are exacerbated by increasing age.
PubMed ID
20120585 View in PubMed
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[Catecholamine excretion in children born in a state of asphyxia]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13407
Source
Pediatr Akus Ginekol. 1973;3:41-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1973

[Catecholemine excretion in young children with acute gastrointestinal diseases]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13440
Source
Pediatr Akus Ginekol. 1972 May-Jun;3:7-8
Publication Type
Article

Catechol-o-methyltransferase gene polymorphism modifies the effect of coffee intake on incidence of acute coronary events.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165792
Source
PLoS One. 2006;1:e117
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Pertti Happonen
Sari Voutilainen
Tomi-Pekka Tuomainen
Jukka T Salonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, School of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, University of Kuopio, Kuopio, Finland. pertti.happonen@uku.fi
Source
PLoS One. 2006;1:e117
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Base Sequence
Caffeine - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Catechol O-Methyltransferase - genetics - metabolism
Catecholamines - metabolism
Coffee - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Coronary Disease - enzymology - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
DNA Primers - genetics
Epinephrine - urine
Finland - epidemiology
Genotype
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - enzymology - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Polymorphism, Genetic
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
The role of coffee intake as a risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD) has been debated for decades. We examined whether the relationship between coffee intake and incidence of CHD events is dependent on the metabolism of circulating catecholamines, as determined by functional polymorphism of the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene.
In a cohort of 773 men who were 42 to 60 years old and free of symptomatic CHD at baseline in 1984-89, 78 participants experienced an acute coronary event during an average follow-up of 13 years. In logistic regression adjusting for age, smoking, family history of CHD, vitamin C deficiency, blood pressure, plasma cholesterol concentration, and diabetes, the odds ratio (90% confidence interval) comparing heavy coffee drinkers with the low activity COMT genotype with those with the high activity or heterozygotic genotypes was 3.2 (1.2-8.4). Urinary adrenaline excretion increased with increasing coffee intake, being over two-fold in heavy drinkers compared with nondrinkers (p = 0.008 for trend).
Heavy coffee consumption increases the incidence of acute coronary events in men with low but not high COMT activity. Further studies are required to determine to which extent circulating catecholamines mediate the relationship between coffee intake and CHD.
Notes
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PubMed ID
17205121 View in PubMed
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[Dynamics of the changes in metabolic and endocrine processes in helicopter crews on commercial flights]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12813
Source
Kosm Biol Aviakosm Med. 1984 Mar-Apr;18(2):43-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
I M Nosova
T A Drobyshevskaia
N A Osadchieva
Source
Kosm Biol Aviakosm Med. 1984 Mar-Apr;18(2):43-7
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aerospace Medicine
Cold Climate
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Epinephrine - urine
Fatty Acids, Nonesterified - blood
Humans
Hydrocortisone - analysis
Insulin - blood
Lactates - blood
Lactic Acid
Middle Aged
Norepinephrine - urine
Time Factors
Tropical Climate
USSR
Abstract
Metabolic and hormonal variations of crewmembers of MI-6 and MI-8 helicopters were investigated. The investigation was performed on 61 pilots, including 18 in the hot and 43 in the cold climate. The following parameters were measured before and after flight: nonesterified fatty acids, lactic acid, insulin, and cortisol in blood, and catecholamines and cortisol in urine. In the hot climate the content of nonesterified fatty acids, lactic acid and insulin increased. The renal excretion of catecholamines and cortisol grew drastically. In the cold climate nonesterified fatty acids increased postflight. Insulin, catecholamines and cortisol tended to grow.
PubMed ID
6371373 View in PubMed
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[Effect of glutaminic acid on the activity of the sympatho-adrenal system and the concentration of calcium in urine under conditions of development of the alcohol abstinence syndrome]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9606
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 2003 Mar-Apr;75(2):78-82
Publication Type
Article
Author
N K Kharchenko
V M Synyts'kyi
T V Kovtun
N A Stohnii
Z O Koval'
Author Affiliation
Ukrainian Scientific-Research Institute of Social and Forensic Psychiatry, Ministry of Public Health of Ukraine, Kyiv.
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 2003 Mar-Apr;75(2):78-82
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adrenal Glands - physiology
Adult
Calcium - urine
Comparative Study
Dopamine - urine
English Abstract
Epinephrine - urine
Ethanol - adverse effects
Female
Glutamates - pharmacology
Humans
Male
Substance Withdrawal Syndrome - urine
Sympathetic Nervous System - physiology
Abstract
The paper deals with the influence of glutaminic acid on the functional activity of the sympatho-adrenal system and the concentration of calcium in urine under conditions of the alcoholic abstinence syndrome development. Changes in the functional activity of sympatho-adrenal system and in the concentration of calcium in the process of the abstinence syndrome development are shown to be of the phase character. It is established that in the period of the developed abstinence syndrome glutaminic acid produces a normalizing action on the excretion of adrenaline and dopamine and also facilitates a decrease in the level of calcium in urine.
PubMed ID
14577175 View in PubMed
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Effects of cold exposure on urinary catecholamines in arctic lemmings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13188
Source
Comp Biochem Physiol C. 1977;58(2C):133-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1977

26 records – page 1 of 3.