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11 records – page 1 of 2.

[15 years of social service in a specialized hospital].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature253292
Source
Vie Med Can Fr. 1974 Aug;3(8):800-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1974
Source
Epilepsia. 1972 Jan;13(1):219-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1972
Author
M. Lund
Source
Epilepsia. 1972 Jan;13(1):219-20
Date
Jan-1972
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Denmark
Epilepsy - rehabilitation
Hospitals, Special - supply & distribution
Humans
Rehabilitation Centers
PubMed ID
4501890 View in PubMed
Less detail

The impact of service and hearing dogs on health-related quality of life and activity level: a Swedish longitudinal intervention study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297487
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2018 06 27; 18(1):497
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
06-27-2018
Author
Martina Lundqvist
Lars-Åke Levin
Kerstin Roback
Jenny Alwin
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linkoping University, Linköping, Sweden. martina.lundqvist@liu.se.
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2018 06 27; 18(1):497
Date
06-27-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Animals
Diabetes Mellitus - rehabilitation
Disabled Persons - rehabilitation
Dogs
Epilepsy - rehabilitation
Exercise
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Quality of Life
Self Concept
Social Behavior
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Individuals with severe disability often require personal assistance and help from informal caregivers, in addition to conventional health care. The utilization of assistance dogs may decrease the need for health and social care and increase the independence of these individuals. Service and hearing dogs are trained to assist specific individuals and can be specialized to meet individual needs. The aim of this study was to describe and explore potential consequences for health-related quality of life, well-being and activity level, of having a certified service or hearing dog.
A longitudinal interventional study with a pre-post design was conducted. At inclusion, all participants in the study had a regular (untrained) companion dog. Data were collected before training of the dog started and three months after certification of the dog. Health-related quality of life was assessed with EQ-5D-3L, EQ-VAS and RAND-36. Well-being was measured with WHO-5 and self-esteem with the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. In addition, questions were asked about physical activity and time spent away from home and on social activities. Subgroups were analyzed for physical service and diabetes alert dogs.
Fifty-five owner-and-dog pairs completed the study (30 physical service dogs, 20 diabetes alert dogs, 2 epilepsy alert dogs, and 3 hearing dogs). Initially, study participants reported low health-related quality of life compared with the general population. At follow-up, health-related quality of life measured with the EQ-VAS, well-being and level of physical activity had improved significantly. In the subgroup analysis, physical service dog owners had lower health-related quality of life than diabetes alert dog owners. The improvement from baseline to follow-up measured with EQ-5D statistically differed between the subgroups.
The target population for service and hearing dogs has an overall low health-related quality of life. Our study indicates that having a certified service or hearing dog may have positive impact on health-related quality of life, well-being and activity level. Service and hearing dogs are a potentially important "wagging tail aid" for this vulnerable population, able to alleviate strain, increase independence, and decrease the risk of social isolation.
The trial was retrospectively registered in http://clinicaltrial.gov , NCT03270592. September, 2017.
PubMed ID
29945630 View in PubMed
Less detail

Improving functional rehabilitation outcome following epilepsy surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234150
Source
Acta Neurol Scand Suppl. 1988;117:122-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Author
R T Fraser
Author Affiliation
University of Washington Regional Epilepsy Center, Seattle.
Source
Acta Neurol Scand Suppl. 1988;117:122-8
Date
1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Counseling
Employment
Epilepsy - rehabilitation - surgery
Family
Humans
Intelligence
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Postoperative Complications - epidemiology
Scandinavia
United States
Abstract
This article reviews the literature on rehabilitation outcome following epilepsy surgery to provide perspective on the research issues in examining vocational and independent living outcome. The existing literature does not suggest dramatic independent living or employment gains as a result of this surgery. Those most likely to profit in these areas are adult seizure patients with excellent surgical outcome, freedom from pre-existing impairments (psychiatric, neuropsychological, or financial dependence on subsidy), and recent presurgical vocational activity. Recommendations are offered toward improving this outcome.
PubMed ID
3051860 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Institution and society. Katrinebjerg Center is not a necessary evil]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature74266
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1983 Dec 14;83(49):4-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-14-1983

[My workplace: Røsumtunet Habiliteringssenter for persons with epilepsy--safety before all. Interview by Marit Fonn].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206402
Source
Tidsskr Sykepl. 1998 Jan 27;86(2):26-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-27-1998

Physical activity in a total population of children and adolescents with cerebral palsy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121092
Source
Res Dev Disabil. 2013 Jan;34(1):157-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Katarina Lauruschkus
Lena Westbom
Inger Hallström
Philippe Wagner
Eva Nordmark
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. katarina.lauruschkus@med.lu.se
Source
Res Dev Disabil. 2013 Jan;34(1):157-67
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Cerebral Palsy - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Child
Epilepsy - rehabilitation
Female
Humans
Leisure Activities
Male
Motor Activity
Motor Skills
Physical Education and Training - statistics & numerical data
Physical Therapy Modalities - utilization
Sports
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The aims of this study were to describe the participation in physical activity of children with cerebral palsy (CP) at school and during leisure time and to identify characteristics associated with physical activity. The frequency of receiving physiotherapeutic interventions were described as a variable of interest. A total population of 364 children with verified CP aged 7-17 years living in the Skåne region in Sweden was studied using cross-sectional data from the CP follow-up programme (CPUP). Proportional odds ratios showed the most severe gross motor limitations Gross Motor Function Classification System Expanded and Revised (GMFCS-E&R) to be a characteristic for low participation in physical education at school (PE) and GMFCS-E&R level III to be a characteristic for low participation in regular physical leisure activity. The age group of 7-11 years and obesity were characteristics associated with high participation in PE, whereas thinness was associated with low participation in regular physical leisure time activities. The highest proportion of children receiving physiotherapeutic interventions was found in GMFCS-E&R level III, while mental retardation, especially if moderate or severe, proved to be an independent characteristic associated with low frequency of physiotherapeutic interventions. Gender and epilepsy did not influence the odds for participation in physical activities. Special considerations are needed when planning interventions for increased physical activity in children with CP, as the individual prerequisites differ, even among children with the same gross motor function level according to the GMFCS-E&R.
PubMed ID
22940169 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Rehabilitation of epileptics in Pitäjänmäki rehabilitation center. Follow-up study of 500 patients].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature252695
Source
Duodecim. 1975;91(4):221-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1975
Author
A. Heinonen
R. Lehtovaara
Source
Duodecim. 1975;91(4):221-4
Date
1975
Language
Finnish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Disability Evaluation
Epilepsy - rehabilitation
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
PubMed ID
1149669 View in PubMed
Less detail

11 records – page 1 of 2.