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Evidence for a separate type of migraine with aura: sporadic hemiplegic migraine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186547
Source
Neurology. 2003 Feb 25;60(4):595-601
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-25-2003
Author
Lise L Thomsen
Elsebet Ostergaard
Jes Olesen
Michael B Russell
Author Affiliation
Danish Headache Center, Department of Neurology, Glostrup Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. LLT@dadlnet.dk
Source
Neurology. 2003 Feb 25;60(4):595-601
Date
Feb-25-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Age of Onset
Comorbidity
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Progression
Epilepsy - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Female
Hemiplegia - diagnosis - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Migraine with Aura - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Sex Distribution
Abstract
To compare clinical characteristics of patients with sporadic hemiplegic migraine (SHM) with those of patients with migraine with typical aura (MA) and patients with familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM).
The authors used a computer search of Denmark's National Patient Register to screen the population for patients with migraine with aura with motor weakness, and also examined case records from headache clinics and private practicing neurologists and placed advertisements. The authors screened patients and their relatives with a semi-structured validated telephone interview. All recruited patients were then interviewed by a physician and given a neurologic examination.
A total of 105 patients with SHM were identified. Seventy-two percent had four typical aura symptoms: visual, sensory, aphasic, and motor. All had at least two symptoms present during SHM attacks. A gradual progression and sequential appearance of aura symptoms was typical; compared with MA, the duration of each aura symptom was usually prolonged and bilateral motor symptoms were more frequent. Of the patients with SHM, 72% fulfilled the criteria for basilar migraine during SHM attacks. The aura was usually followed by headache, as is common in FHM but not MA.
Patients with sporadic hemiplegic migraine had clinical symptoms identical to familial hemiplegic migraine and significantly different from migraine with typical aura. Sporadic hemiplegic migraine is a separate entity, and should be classified with familial hemiplegic migraine.
Notes
Comment In: Neurology. 2003 Feb 25;60(4):536-712601089
PubMed ID
12601098 View in PubMed
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[Medical and social aspects of childhood epilepsy].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172275
Source
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 2005;105(9):64-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005

Prevalence of benign epileptiform variants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151573
Source
Clin Neurophysiol. 2009 May;120(5):856-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Balagopal Santoshkumar
Jaron J R Chong
Warren T Blume
Richard S McLachlan
G Bryan Young
David C Diosy
Jorge G Burneo
Seyed M Mirsattari
Author Affiliation
Epilepsy Programme, London Health Sciences Centre, B10-108, 339 Windermere Rd, London, Ont., Canada N6A 5A5.
Source
Clin Neurophysiol. 2009 May;120(5):856-61
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cerebral Cortex - physiopathology
Child
Child, Preschool
Electroencephalography - methods
Epilepsy - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Evoked Potentials - physiology
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Predictive value of tests
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Theta Rhythm
Young Adult
Abstract
There are numerous distinctive benign electroencephalographic (EEG) patterns which are morphologically epileptiform but are non-epileptic. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of different benign epileptiform variants (BEVs) among subjects who underwent routine EEG recordings in a large EEG laboratory over 35 years.
We retrospectively studied the prevalence of BEVs among 35,249 individuals who underwent outpatient EEG recordings at London Health Sciences Centre in London, Ontario, Canada between January 1, 1972 and December 31, 2007. The definitions of the Committee on Terminology of the International Federation of Societies for EEG and Clinical Neurophysiology (IFSECN) were used to delineate epileptiform patterns (Chatrian et al. A glossary of terms most commonly used by clinical electroencephlographers. Electroenceph Clin Neurophysiol 1974;37:538-48) and the descriptions of Klass and Westmoreland [Klass DW, Westmoreland BF. Nonepileptogenic epileptiform electroenephalographic activity. Ann Neurol 1985;18:627-35] were used to categorize the BEVs.
BEVs were identified in 1183 out of 35,249 subjects (3.4%). The distribution of individual BEVs were as follows: benign sporadic sleep spikes 1.85%, wicket waves 0.03%, 14 and 6 Hz positive spikes 0.52%, 6 Hz spike-and-waves 1.02%, rhythmic temporal theta bursts of drowsiness 0.12%, and subclinical rhythmic electrographic discharge of adults in 0.07%.
The prevalence of six types of BEVs was relatively low among the Canadian subjects when compared to the reports from other countries.
BEVs are relatively uncommon incidental EEG findings. Unlike focal epileptic spikes and generalized spike-and-waves, BEVs do not predict the occurrence of epilepsy. Accurate identification of the BEVs can avoid misdiagnosis and unnecessary investigations.
Notes
Comment In: Epilepsy Curr. 2010 Mar;10(2):34-520231918
PubMed ID
19362516 View in PubMed
Less detail