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1009 records – page 1 of 101.

[3-year experiences with surgical treatment of epilepsy at the Hvidovre hospital].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225409
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1991 Nov 4;153(45):3144-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-4-1991
Author
B. Rogvi-Hansen
J. Alving
A R Andersen
M. Dam
L. Friberg
A. Fuglsang-Frederiksen
L. Gram
M G Herning
H. Høgenhaven
K. Højgaard
Author Affiliation
Neuromedicinsk afdeling, Hvidovre Hospital, København.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1991 Nov 4;153(45):3144-8
Date
Nov-4-1991
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Brain - surgery
Denmark
Epilepsy - surgery
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Methods
Middle Aged
Postoperative Complications - etiology
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
The results of a retrospective survey of 48 patients submitted to neurosurgery for medically intractable epilepsy are presented. Twenty-eight patients were treated with selective amygdalohippocampectomy, one with temporal lobe resection, 12 with anterior callosotomy and seven with a total callosotomy. Of the amygdalohippocampectomized patients and the one with temporal lobe resection (n = 29), 52% were seizure free, 17% experienced rare seizures, 7% had a worthwhile improvement while 24% observed no worthwhile improvement (follow-up time 6 to 36 months). Of the callosotomized patients, 11% were free from generalized seizures, 69% had a significant seizure reduction and 18% experienced no worthwhile improvement. The observed neurological complications were: one patient had hemianopia, one had superior quadrant anopia, four developed unilateral anosmia and one complete anosmia. The callosotomized patients, with two exceptions, were all mentally and physically handicapped. In the callosotomy group, two patients died, one from a intracerebral hematoma three months after the operation and another patient seven months postoperatively from unknown causes.
PubMed ID
1957360 View in PubMed
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10-year outcome of childhood epilepsy in well-functioning children and adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136518
Source
Eur J Paediatr Neurol. 2011 Jul;15(4):331-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
Pysse Jonsson
Orvar Eeg-Olofsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Women's and Children's Health/Neuropaediatrics, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Paediatr Neurol. 2011 Jul;15(4):331-7
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Cohort Studies
Epilepsy - classification - drug therapy - epidemiology
Family Health
Female
Humans
Infant
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
A population based study of epilepsy in children from a Swedish county including all children aged 1 month to 16 years was reported in 2006.
To describe the medical outcome, seizure types, epilepsy syndromes, treatment, individual and family history in children from this study who were well-functioning in January 1997 and the outcome after 10 years.
Forty-five individuals, 11-21 years, 19 females, and their parents responded to a questionnaire and the hospital records were reviewed.
At the end of the 10-year period 75.6% of the patients were in remission. Focal seizures and focal seizures with secondary generalization were found in 57.8%. Rolandic epilepsy had been diagnosed in 33.3%, other idiopathic focal epilepsies in 11.0%, cryptogenic and symptomatic focal epilepsies in 22.2%, childhood absence epilepsy in 8.9%, juvenile absence epilepsy and Jeavons syndrome in each 2.2%, West syndrome in 4.4%, and other "generalized" epilepsies in 15.5%. The patients had a history of simple febrile seizures in 15.6% and of primary headache in 24.4%. Monotherapy with antiepileptic drugs was used by 64.4%, and valproate was the most common first drug of choice. A family history of epilepsy was found in 44.4%, febrile seizures in 17.7%, and primary headache in 57.8%. A coincidence of focal and generalized epilepsy phenotypes was found in some families.
Longitudinal studies are of importance in epilepsy epidemiology. Our results reflect the selection of only well-functioning individuals with epilepsy from the population based original study.
PubMed ID
21371918 View in PubMed
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A 14-year follow-up of children with normal and abnormal birth weight for their gestational age. A population study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature239462
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1985 Jan;74(1):62-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1985
Author
P. Rantakallio
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1985 Jan;74(1):62-9
Date
Jan-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Birth weight
Cerebral Palsy - epidemiology
Child Development
Epilepsy - epidemiology
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Gestational Age
Health Surveys
Humans
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Intellectual Disability - epidemiology
Male
Mortality
Nervous System Diseases - epidemiology
Abstract
Mortality, major neurological handicaps--including mental retardation, cerebral palsy and epilepsy--educational subnormality and height at 14 years of age were studied by birth weight percentiles in a birth cohort of 12 000 children from northern Finland. Infant mortality was significantly higher below the mean -2 SD, 10th and 25th percentiles, than in the median class, from 25th to 75th percentiles, but mortality from one to 14 years only in the lowest weight class. Educational subnormality, including mental retardation +/- some other handicap, was highly significantly more frequent in all the percentile classes lower than the median class but showed no significant tendency to be less frequent in the percentiles over the median. It was also highly significantly more frequent among the preterm than the term infant. The number of children with a major neurological handicap but normal school performance did not vary significantly by birth weight percentiles or by gestational age. Height at 14 years increased significantly by birth weight percentiles. The height of the boys with birth weight mean - and +2 SD was nevertheless within the 25th-75th percentiles for height at 14 years in general, while the height of the girls came close to these percentile limits. The preterm infants were significantly shorter than the term infants at 14 years.
PubMed ID
3984729 View in PubMed
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[15 years of social service in a specialized hospital].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature253292
Source
Vie Med Can Fr. 1974 Aug;3(8):800-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1974

Aberrant expression of miR-218 and miR-204 in human mesial temporal lobe epilepsy and hippocampal sclerosis-convergence on axonal guidance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260948
Source
Epilepsia. 2014 Dec;55(12):2017-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Sanne S Kaalund
Morten T Venø
Mads Bak
Rikke S Møller
Henning Laursen
Flemming Madsen
Helle Broholm
Bjørn Quistorff
Peter Uldall
Niels Tommerup
Sakari Kauppinen
Anne Sabers
Kees Fluiter
Lisbeth B Møller
Anne Y Nossent
Asli Silahtaroglu
Jørgen Kjems
Eleonora Aronica
Zeynep Tümer
Source
Epilepsia. 2014 Dec;55(12):2017-27
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Animals
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Embryo, Mammalian
Epilepsy, Temporal Lobe - complications - metabolism - pathology
Female
Gene Expression Profiling
Gene Expression Regulation - physiology
Glutamate Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins - genetics - metabolism
Hippocampus - metabolism
Humans
Male
MicroRNAs - metabolism
Middle Aged
Nerve Tissue Proteins - metabolism
Netherlands
Pyramidal Cells - metabolism - pathology
Receptors, Metabotropic Glutamate - metabolism
Reproducibility of Results
Sclerosis - etiology - pathology
Sequence Analysis, RNA
Swine
Young Adult
Abstract
Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) is one of the most common types of the intractable epilepsies and is most often associated with hippocampal sclerosis (HS), which is characterized by pronounced loss of hippocampal pyramidal neurons. microRNAs (miRNAs) have been shown to be dysregulated in epilepsy and neurodegenerative diseases, and we hypothesized that miRNAs could be involved in the pathogenesis of MTLE and HS.
miRNA expression was quantified in hippocampal specimens from human patients using miRNA microarray and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction RT-PCR, and by RNA-seq on fetal brain specimens from domestic pigs. In situ hybridization was used to show the spatial distribution of miRNAs in the human hippocampus. The potential effect of miRNAs on targets genes was investigated using the dual luciferase reporter gene assay.
miRNA expression profiling showed that 25 miRNAs were up-regulated and 5 were down-regulated in hippocampus biopsies of MTLE/HS patients compared to controls. We showed that miR-204 and miR-218 were significantly down-regulated in MTLE and HS, and both were expressed in neurons in all subfields of normal hippocampus. Moreover, miR-204 and miR-218 showed strong changes in expression during fetal development of the hippocampus in pigs, and we identified four target genes, involved in axonal guidance and synaptic plasticity, ROBO1, GRM1, SLC1A2, and GNAI2, as bona fide targets of miR-218. GRM1 was also shown to be a direct target of miR-204.
miR-204 and miR-218 are developmentally regulated in the hippocampus and may contribute to the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of MTLE and HS.
PubMed ID
25410734 View in PubMed
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Abnormal electroencephalograms in patients with long QT syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106966
Source
Heart Rhythm. 2013 Dec;10(12):1877-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Kristina H Haugaa
Tommy Tveit Vestervik
Stein Andersson
Jan Peder Amlie
Ellen Jørum
Leif Gjerstad
Erik Taubøll
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Oslo University Hospital-Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway; Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: kristina.haugaa@rr-research.no.
Source
Heart Rhythm. 2013 Dec;10(12):1877-83
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Brain - physiopathology
Electroencephalography
Epilepsy - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Long QT Syndrome - complications - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Survival Rate - trends
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The long QT syndrome (LQTS) is an inherited cardiac channelopathy associated with syncope and sudden cardiac death due to ventricular arrhythmias. It is most frequently caused by potassium channel mutations. Potassium channels are also expressed in brain tissue and play an important role in idiopathic epilepsies. Recent reports have indicated that related potassium channel mutations may coexpress as concomitant epilepsy and LQTS.
The purpose of this study was to explore cerebral activity by means of EEG recordings in individuals with LQTS related to potassium channel mutations.
Seventeen individuals with confirmed LQTS related to potassium channel mutations (11 LQT1 and 6 LQT2) were prospectively studied with 21-channel electroencephalography (EEG) LQTS -related symptoms, comorbidity, medication, and QTc (12-lead ECG) were recorded. Sixteen healthy individuals previously studied with EEG served as a control group. All EEGs were reviewed by two independent neurophysiologists.
EEG recordings were abnormal in 12 of 17 patients (71%) in the LQTS group, whereas abnormalities were present in only 2 of 16 healthy controls (13%; P
Notes
Comment In: Heart Rhythm. 2013 Dec;10(12):1884-524121000
PubMed ID
24080067 View in PubMed
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Absence of electroencephalographic seizure activity in patients treated for head injury with an intracranial pressure-targeted therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92263
Source
J Neurosurg. 2009 Feb;110(2):300-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
Olivecrona Magnus
Zetterlund Bo
Rodling-Wahlström Marie
Naredi Silvana
Koskinen Lars-Owe D
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden. magnus.olivecrona@vll.se
Source
J Neurosurg. 2009 Feb;110(2):300-5
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Conscious Sedation
Drug Therapy, Combination
Electroencephalography - drug effects
Epilepsy, Post-Traumatic - physiopathology - prevention & control
Female
Fentanyl
Frontal Lobe - drug effects - physiopathology
Glasgow Coma Scale
Humans
Hypnotics and Sedatives
Intensive Care
Intracranial Pressure - drug effects - physiology
Male
Midazolam
Middle Aged
Parietal Lobe - drug effects - physiopathology
Propofol
Thiopental
Abstract
OBJECT: The authors prospectively studied the occurrence of clinical and nonclinical electroencephalographically verified seizures during treatment with an intracranial pressure (ICP)-targeted protocol in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). METHODS: All patients treated for TBI at the Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital Umeå, Sweden, were eligible for the study. The inclusion was consecutive and based on the availability of the electroencephalographic (EEG) monitoring equipment. Patients were included irrespective of pupil size, pupil reaction, or level of consciousness as long as their first measured cerebral perfusion pressure was > 10 mm Hg. The patients were treated in a protocol-guided manner with an ICP-targeted treatment based on the Lund concept. The patients were continuously sedated with midazolam, fentanyl, propofol, or thiopental, or combinations thereof. Five-lead continuous EEG monitoring was performed with the electrodes at F3, F4, P3, P4, and a midline reference. Sensitivity was set at 100 muV per cm and filter settings 0.5-70 Hz. Amplitude-integrated EEG recording and relative band power trends were displayed. The trends were analyzed offline by trained clinical neurophysiologists. RESULTS: Forty-seven patients (mean age 40 years) were studied. Their median Glasgow Coma Scale score at the time of sedation and intubation was 6 (range 3-15). In 8.5% of the patients clinical seizures were observed before sedation and intubation. Continuous EEG monitoring was performed for a total of 7334 hours. During this time neither EEG nor clinical seizures were observed. CONCLUSIONS: Our protocol-guided ICP targeted treatment seems to protect patients with severe TBI from clinical and subclinical seizures and thus reduces the risk of secondary brain injury.
PubMed ID
18759609 View in PubMed
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Absence of glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies in childhood epilepsies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33038
Source
Pediatr Neurol. 1999 Nov;21(5):794-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1999
Author
H. Rantala
P. Kulmala
K. Savola
M. Knip
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Pediatr Neurol. 1999 Nov;21(5):794-6
Date
Nov-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antibodies - blood
Biological Markers - blood
Child
Child, Preschool
Epilepsy - diagnosis - enzymology
Female
Glutamate Decarboxylase - blood - immunology
Humans
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies are present in some patients with therapy-resistant epilepsy. The authors measured glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies in an unselected population of 114 children with different types of epilepsy. Three children with temporal lobe epilepsy and six children with various other types of epilepsy had intractable epilepsy. None of the children tested positive for glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies. The study suggests that glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody testing cannot be recommended in unselected cases of childhood epilepsy.
PubMed ID
10593668 View in PubMed
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Access to surgery for paediatric patients with medically refractory epilepsy: a systems analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106328
Source
Epilepsy Res. 2013 Dec;107(3):286-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Morgan E Lim
James M Bowen
O Carter Snead
Irene Elliott
Elizabeth Donner
Shelly K Weiss
Hiroshi Otsubo
Ayako Ochi
James Drake
James T Rutka
Andrew Worster
Robert B Hopkins
Ron Goeree
Jean-Eric Tarride
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Faculty of Health Sciences, McMaster University, McMaster University Medical Centre, 1200 Main Street West, HSC-2C, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8N 3Z5; Programs for Assessment of Technology in Health (PATH) Research Institute, St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton, 2000-25 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8P 1H1. Electronic address: limme@mcmaster.ca.
Source
Epilepsy Res. 2013 Dec;107(3):286-96
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Electroencephalography - methods
Epilepsy - diagnosis - epidemiology - surgery
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Systems Analysis
Video Recording - methods
Abstract
A systems analysis perspective was undertaken to evaluate access to surgery for children with medically refractory epilepsy (MRE) in Ontario, the largest province in Canada. The analysis focused on the assessment of referral patterns, healthcare utilization, time intervals and patient flow to determine surgical candidacy in children with MRE. The purpose of this systems analysis study was to identify rate limiting steps that may lead to delayed surgical candidacy decision and surgery.
Prolonged video electroencephalography (vEEG) is the common entry point into the process for all potential epilepsy surgery candidates. Therefore, a single centre retrospective chart review of children and adolescents referred to the epilepsy monitoring unit (EMU) for vEEG monitoring at the primary referral centre for paediatric epilepsy surgery in the province. Basic demographic and referral data were abstracted for all screened cases. Included cases were: (1) age 8h). Forty five percent (n=160) of patients came to seizure conference for discussion of their data, of whom 40% (64/160) were considered surgical candidates. Time from first seizure to EMU referral was approximately 4.6 years. Time from referral to admission and admission to first seizure conference were approximately 103 days and 71 days, respectively. From initial EMU referral to surgery ranged from 1.6 to 1.1 years depending on whether the patient required invasive monitoring with intracranial EEG. Overall, 95% of surgical patients had a reduction in seizure frequency, 74% were seizure free after one year post-surgery.
Referral rates for surgical assessment are low relative to the estimated number of children living with MRE in Ontario, less than 2%. Hence, only a limited number of children with this disorder in the province of Ontario who could benefit from epilepsy surgery are being assessed for surgical candidacy. The majority of Ontario children with MRE are not being provided the potential opportunity to be seizure free and live without functional limitations following surgical intervention. These data document the critical need for health system redesign in Ontario, the goal of which should be to provide more consistent and just access to evidence-based medical and surgical care for those citizens of the province who suffer from epilepsy.
PubMed ID
24192043 View in PubMed
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Accidental injury is a serious risk in children with typical absence epilepsy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14288
Source
Arch Neurol. 1996 Sep;53(9):929-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1996
Author
E C Wirrell
P R Camfield
C S Camfield
J M Dooley
K E Gordon
Author Affiliation
IWK-Grace Health Centre, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.
Source
Arch Neurol. 1996 Sep;53(9):929-32
Date
Sep-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - statistics & numerical data
Accidents - statistics & numerical data
Accidents, Traffic - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Adult
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - complications - physiopathology
Burns - epidemiology
Child
Comparative Study
Craniocerebral Trauma - epidemiology
Electroencephalography
Epilepsy, Absence - complications - physiopathology
Fractures, Bone - epidemiology
Humans
Medical Records
Near Drowning - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To determine if young adults with a history of typical absence epilepsy (AE) in childhood have a greater risk of accidental injury than controls with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA). To assess the nature and severity of these injuries. METHODS: All patients with AE or JRA diagnosed between 1977 and 1985, who were 18 years or older at the onset of the study, were identified from review of pediatric electroencephalographic records for the province of Nova Scotia (AE) or review of the medical records database at the only tertiary care pediatric center for the province (JRA). Fifty-nine (86%) of 69 patients with AE and 61 (80%) of 76 patients with JRA participated in an interview in 1994 or 1995, assessing nature, severity, and treatment of prior accidental injuries. Patients with AE were further questioned about injuries sustained during an absence seizure. RESULTS: Sixteen (27%) of 59 patients with AE reported accidental injury during an absence seizure, with risk of injury being 9% per person-year of AE. Most injuries (81%) occurred during anti-epileptic drug therapy. Although the majority of injuries did not require treatment, 2 (13%) of 16 patients required minor treatment and 2 (13%) of 16 were admitted to hospital. The risk of accidental injury resulting from an absence seizure in person-years at risk was highest in juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (45%), moderate in juvenile AE (14%), and lowest in childhood AE (3%). Patients with AE had a greater number of overall accidental injuries than those with JRA (P
Notes
Comment In: Arch Neurol. 1997 Sep;54(9):10639311348
PubMed ID
8815859 View in PubMed
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1009 records – page 1 of 101.