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The 1891-1920 birth cohort of Quebec chrysotile miners and millers: development from 1904 and mortality to 1992.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210233
Source
Ann Occup Hyg. 1997 Jan;41(1):13-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1997
Author
F D Liddell
A D McDonald
J C McDonald
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McGill University Montreal, Canada.
Source
Ann Occup Hyg. 1997 Jan;41(1):13-36
Date
Jan-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects
Asbestos, Serpentine - adverse effects
Asbestosis - etiology - mortality
Cause of Death
Cohort Studies
Environmental monitoring
Epidemiological Monitoring
Humans
Male
Mesothelioma - etiology - mortality
Mining - statistics & numerical data
Neoplasms - etiology - mortality
Quebec - epidemiology
Abstract
This paper draws together the mortality experience for a cohort of some 11000 male Quebec Chrysotile miners and millers, reported at intervals since 1971 and now again updated. Of the 10918 men in the complete cohort, 1138 were lost to view, almost all never traced after employment of only a month or two before 1935; the other 9780 men were traced into 1992. Of these, 8009 (82%) are known to have died: 657 from lung cancer, 38 from mesotheliona, 1205 from other malignant disease, 108 from pneumoconiosis and 561 from other non-malignant respiratory diseases (excluding tuberculosis). After early fluctuations. SMRs (all causes) against Quebec rates have been reasonably steady since about 1945. For men first employed in Asbestos, mine or factory, they were very much what might have been expected for a blue collar population without any hazardous exposure. SMRs in the Thetford Mines area were almost 8% higher, but in line with anecdotal evidence concerning socio-economic status. At exposures below 300 (million particles per cubic foot) x years, (mpcf.y), equivalent to roughly 1000 (fibres/ml) x years-or, say, 10 years in the 1940s at 80 (fibres/ml)-findings were as follows. There were no discernible associations of degree of exposure and SMRs, whether for all causes of death or for all the specific cancer sites examined. The average SMRs were 1.07 (all causes), and 1.16, 0.93, 1.03 and 1.21, respectively, for gastric, other abdominal, laryngeal and lung cancer. Men whose exposures were less then 300 mpcf.y suffered almost one-half of the 146 deaths from pneumoconiosis or mesothelioma; the elimination of these two causes would have reduced these men's SMR (all causes) from 1.07 to approximately 1.06. Thus it is concluded from the viewpoint of mortality that exposure in this industry to less than 300 mpcf.y has been essentially innocuous, although there was a small risk or pneumoconiosis or mesothelioma. Higher exposures have, however, led to excesses, increasing with degree of exposure, of mortality from all causes, and from lung cancer and stomach cancer, but such exposures, of at least 300 mpcf.y, are several orders of magnitude more severe than any that have been seen for many years. The effects of cigarette smoking were much more deleterious than those of dust exposure, not only for lung cancer (the SMR for smokers of 20+ cigarettes a day being 4.6 times higher than that for non-smokers), but also for stomach cancer (2.0 times higher), laryngeal cancer (2.9 times higher), and-most importantly-for all causes (1.6 times higher).
Notes
Comment In: Ann Occup Hyg. 1997 Jan;41(1):3-129072948
Comment In: Ann Occup Hyg. 2001 Jun;45(4):329-35; author reply 336-811414250
PubMed ID
9072947 View in PubMed
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[Accumulation of heavy metals in biologic materials of mining workers and of nearby population].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176713
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2004;(11):38-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
M A Mukasheva
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2004;(11):38-40
Date
2004
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Catchment Area (Health)
Environmental monitoring
Epidemiological Monitoring
Hair - chemistry
Humans
Metals, Heavy - analysis
Middle Aged
Mining
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - metabolism
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
The article contains results concerning spectral analysis of biologic materials (blood and hair) for heavy metals content. These results helped to reveal health risk factors for workers engaged into chromium ores extraction and for nearby residents.
PubMed ID
15636126 View in PubMed
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Age distribution of infection and hospitalization among Canadian First Nations populations during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118146
Source
Am J Public Health. 2013 Feb;103(2):e39-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Luiz C Mostaço-Guidolin
Sherry M J Towers
David L Buckeridge
Seyed M Moghadas
Author Affiliation
Centre for Disease Modelling, York Institute for Health Research, York University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Am J Public Health. 2013 Feb;103(2):e39-44
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Epidemiological Monitoring
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Indians, North American - ethnology
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype
Influenza, Human - ethnology
Manitoba - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Pandemics - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
We estimated age-standardized ratios of infection and hospitalization among Canadian First Nations (FN) populations and compared their distributions with those estimated for non-FN populations in Manitoba, Canada.
For the spring and fall 2009 waves of the H1N1 pandemic, we obtained daily numbers of laboratory-confirmed and hospitalized cases of H1N1 infection, stratified by 5-year age groups and FN status. We calculated age-standardized ratios with confidence intervals for each wave and compared ratios between age groups in each ethnic group and between the 2 waves for FN and non-FN populations.
Incidence and hospitalization ratios in all FN age groups during the first wave were significantly higher than those in non-FN age groups (P
PubMed ID
23237152 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Duodecim. 1996;112(15):1378-89
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
T. Haahtela
Author Affiliation
Department of Allergology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Finland.
Source
Duodecim. 1996;112(15):1378-89
Date
1996
Language
Finnish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Air Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects
Allergens - adverse effects
Environmental monitoring
Epidemiological Monitoring
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Hypersensitivity - epidemiology - etiology
Risk assessment
PubMed ID
10596122 View in PubMed
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Air pollution and emergency department visits for otitis media: a case-crossover study in Edmonton, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141881
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2010 Nov;118(11):1631-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Roger Zemek
Mieczyslaw Szyszkowicz
Brian H Rowe
Author Affiliation
Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario and University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2010 Nov;118(11):1631-6
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis
Air Pollution - statistics & numerical data
Alberta
Carbon Monoxide - analysis
Child, Preschool
Cross-Over Studies
Emergency Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Environmental monitoring
Epidemiological Monitoring
Female
Humans
Infant
Inhalation Exposure - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Logistic Models
Male
Nitrogen Dioxide - analysis
Odds Ratio
Otitis Media - epidemiology
Ozone - analysis
Particle Size
Particulate Matter - analysis
Risk factors
Sulfur Dioxide - analysis
Weather
Abstract
Otitis media (OM) is one of the most common early childhood infections, resulting in an enormous economic burden to the health care system through unscheduled doctor visits and antibiotic prescriptions.
The objective of this study was to investigate the potential association between ambient air pollution exposure and emergency department (ED) visits for OM.
Ten years of ED data were obtained from Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, and linked to levels of air pollution: carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), ozone (O3), sulfur dioxide, and particulate matter (PM) of median aerometric diameter
Notes
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PubMed ID
20663739 View in PubMed
Less detail

All-time high tularaemia incidence in Norway in 2011: report from the national surveillance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263869
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2014 Nov;33(11):1919-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
K W Larssen
K. Bergh
B T Heier
L. Vold
J E Afset
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2014 Nov;33(11):1919-26
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Epidemiological Monitoring
Female
Francisella tularensis - isolation & purification
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Seasons
Topography, Medical
Tularemia - epidemiology - pathology
Young Adult
Abstract
Tularaemia has mainly been a sporadic disease in Norway. In 2011, 180 persons (3.7 per 100,000 population) were diagnosed with tularaemia. This article describes the epidemiological and clinical features of tularaemia cases during a year with exceptionally high tularaemia incidence. Data from the national reference laboratory for tularaemia combined with epidemiological data from the Norwegian Surveillance System for Communicable Diseases (MSIS) were used. The incidence of tularaemia varied greatly between counties, but almost every county was involved. The majority (77.8 %) of the cases were diagnosed during the autumn and winter months. The geographic distribution also showed seasonal patterns. Overall, oropharyngeal tularaemia (41.1 %) was the most common clinical presentation, followed by glandular (14.4 %), typhoidal (14.4 %), respiratory (13.3 %) and ulceroglandular (12.8 %) tularaemia. From January to April, oropharyngeal tularaemia dominated, from May to September, ulceroglandular tularaemia was most common, whereas from October to December, there was an almost even distribution between several clinical forms of tularaemia. Eighty-five (47.2 %) of all tularaemia cases were admitted to, or seen as outpatients in, hospitals. An unexpectedly high number (3.9 %) of the patients had positive blood culture with Francisella tularensis. The clinical manifestations of tularaemia in Norway in 2011 were diverse, and changing throughout the year. Classification was sometimes difficult due to uncharacteristic symptoms and unknown mode of transmission. In rodent years, tularaemia is an important differential diagnosis to keep in mind at all times of the year for a variety of clinical symptoms.
PubMed ID
24874046 View in PubMed
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Ambient sulphur dioxide exposure and emergency department visits for migraine in Vancouver, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151800
Source
Int J Occup Med Environ Health. 2009;22(1):7-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Mieczyslaw Szyszkowicz
Brian H Rowe
Gilaad G Kaplan
Author Affiliation
Population Studies Division, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada. mietek_szyszkowicz@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Int J Occup Med Environ Health. 2009;22(1):7-12
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Air Pollutants - toxicity
Air Pollution - adverse effects
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Emergency Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Environmental monitoring
Epidemiological Monitoring
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Migraine Disorders - chemically induced
Seasons
Sex Factors
Sulfur Dioxide - toxicity
Young Adult
Abstract
Ambient exposure to sulphur dioxide (SO2) has been previously associated with emergency department (ED) visits for migraine headaches. In the present study, the objective was to examine the relationship between ED visits for migraine and ambient sulphur dioxide concentrations.
This was a time-series study of 1059 ED visits for migraine (ICD-9: 346) recorded at a Vancouver hospital between 1999 and 2003 (1 520 days). Air pollution levels of SO2 were measured by fixed-site monitoring stations. The generalized linear mixed models technique was applied to regress daily counts of ED visits for migraine on the levels of the pollutant after adjusting for meteorological conditions: temperature and relative humidity. The analysis was stratified by season and gender.
Positive and statistically significant correlations were observed for SO2 exposure and ED visits for migraine for females during colder months (October-March). The percentage increase in daily visits was 16.8% (95% CI: 1.2-34.8) for a 4-day average (of daily mean concentrations) SO2 level, for an interquartile range (IQR) increase of 1.9 ppb.
Our findings provide additional support for a consistent correlation between migraine headache and air pollution (SO2).
PubMed ID
19329386 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Analysis of prevalence and variability of Legionella pneumophila and Legionella spp. strains on the basis of study of allelic profiles].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145915
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2009 Nov-Dec;(6):17-21
Publication Type
Article
Author
O L Voronina
M S Kunda
V V Bitkina
T I Karpova
V V Romanenko
A L Durasova
I S Tartakovskii
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2009 Nov-Dec;(6):17-21
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alleles
Environmental monitoring
Epidemiological Monitoring
Genes, Bacterial - genetics
Humans
Legionella - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Legionella pneumophila - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Legionnaires' Disease - epidemiology - microbiology
Phylogeny
Russia - epidemiology
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Water Microbiology
Water Supply - analysis
Abstract
To analyze prevalence and variability of Legionella strains isolated in town Verkhnaya Pyshma located in Sverdlovsk region during prophylactic surveillance of potentially dangerous water objects in 2007 - 2008.
Sequencing of mip gene was conducted for identification of species of Legionella. Multi-locus sequence typing was used for describing of allelic profiles of Legionella pneumophila strains.
Five firstly identified on Russian territory strains of Legionella species were deposited in institute's collection. Sixty-three strains of L. pneumophila belonging to 28 sequence types were characterized. Relation between strains isolated in industrial building and from water supply system was demonstrated.
Observations made on the basis of study of L. pneumophila strains isolated from cooling stacks of industrial plants confirmed potential danger of these objects as a source of dissemination of Legionella infection.
PubMed ID
20095417 View in PubMed
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238 records – page 1 of 24.