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97 records – page 1 of 10.

[Anthropurgic foci of pseudotuberculosis and the mechanisms of their formation in groups of servicemen].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168924
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2006 Mar-Apr;(2):11-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
M V Makhnev
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2006 Mar-Apr;(2):11-7
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Disease Reservoirs - microbiology
Environmental Microbiology
Environmental monitoring
Epidemiological Monitoring
Humans
Military Personnel
Rodentia - microbiology
Russia - epidemiology
Vegetables - microbiology
Yersinia pseudotuberculosis - isolation & purification
Yersinia pseudotuberculosis Infections - epidemiology
Abstract
At the period of 1982 - 2003, morbidity rate in pseudotuberculosis and the Yersinia pseudotuberculosis culture rates in groups of servicemen (from different abiotic objects, from humans and small rodents) in different geographic zones were studied. The cases of the isolation of Y. pseudotuberculosis were most frequently registered in groups of servicemen in the Far East and the Kola Peninsula. In these regions the highest morbidity rate in pseudotuberculosis was registered among servicemen. The contamination rate of vegetables during the year was always greater than in other objects under study, including small rodents. The study demonstrated that in the Armed Forces could appear, temporary and relatively constant anthropurgic foci of pseudotuberculosis even in non endemic regions. They were formed in the objects of the food supply service due to the supply of contaminated vegetables. Synanthropic rodents played a secondary role, though they too facilitated the formation of new anthropurgic foci. Under definite conditions anthropurgic foci could exist autonomously, independently of natural foci.
PubMed ID
16758891 View in PubMed
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[Assessment of epidemic manifestations of the West Nile fever in the Volgograd region depending on the climatic conditions].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263064
Source
Vopr Virusol. 2014;59(6):42-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
V A Safronov
V Ju Smolenskij
V P Smeljanskij
S T Savchenko
A S Razdorskij
V P Toporkov
Source
Vopr Virusol. 2014;59(6):42-6
Date
2014
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Climate
Culicidae - virology
Epidemics
Epidemiological Monitoring
Humans
Incidence
Insect Vectors - virology
Russia - epidemiology
Temperature
West Nile Fever - epidemiology - transmission - virology
West Nile virus - physiology
Abstract
Results of the analysis of the increase in the incidence of epidemic of the West Nile fever and climate conditions in the Volgograd region were presented. Certain seasonal periods and threshold values of temperature and humidity statistically associated with the epidemic rise were identified. The discussion of the probable mechanisms of indirect effects of atmospheric heat on the elements of the epidemic process was carried out.
PubMed ID
25929037 View in PubMed
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Benchmark concentrations for methyl mercury obtained from the 9-year follow-up of the Seychelles Child Development Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168589
Source
Neurotoxicology. 2006 Sep;27(5):702-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
Edwin van Wijngaarden
Christopher Beck
Conrad F Shamlaye
Elsa Cernichiari
Philip W Davidson
Gary J Myers
Thomas W Clarkson
Author Affiliation
Department of Community and Preventive Medicine, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Box 644, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, NY 14642, USA. edwin_van_wijngaarden@urmc.rochester.edu
Source
Neurotoxicology. 2006 Sep;27(5):702-9
Date
Sep-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Child
Child Development
Child, Preschool
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Epidemiological Monitoring
Female
Fishes
Follow-Up Studies
Food Contamination
Humans
Male
Maternal-Fetal Exchange
Maximum Allowable Concentration
Mercury Poisoning, Nervous System - etiology - physiopathology
Methylmercury compounds - analysis
Models, Statistical
Neuropsychological Tests - statistics & numerical data
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Seychelles - epidemiology
Abstract
Methyl mercury (MeHg) is highly toxic to the developing nervous system. Human exposure is mainly from fish consumption since small amounts are present in all fish. Findings of developmental neurotoxicity following high-level prenatal exposure to MeHg raised the question of whether children whose mothers consumed fish contaminated with background levels during pregnancy are at an increased risk of impaired neurological function. Benchmark doses determined from studies in New Zealand, and the Faroese and Seychelles Islands indicate that a level of 4-25 parts per million (ppm) measured in maternal hair may carry a risk to the infant. However, there are numerous sources of uncertainty that could affect the derivation of benchmark doses, and it is crucial to continue to investigate the most appropriate derivation of safe consumption levels. Earlier, we published the findings from benchmark analyses applied to the data collected on the Seychelles main cohort at the 66-month follow-up period. Here, we expand on the main cohort analyses by determining the benchmark doses (BMD) of MeHg level in maternal hair based on 643 Seychellois children for whom 26 different neurobehavioral endpoints were measured at 9 years of age. Dose-response models applied to these continuous endpoints incorporated a variety of covariates and included the k-power model, the Weibull model, and the logistic model. The average 95% lower confidence limit of the BMD (BMDL) across all 26 endpoints varied from 20.1 ppm (range=17.2-22.5) for the logistic model to 20.4 ppm (range=17.9-23.0) for the k-power model. These estimates are somewhat lower than those obtained after 66 months of follow-up. The Seychelles Child Development Study continues to provide a firm scientific basis for the derivation of safe levels of MeHg consumption.
PubMed ID
16806480 View in PubMed
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[BIOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF SALMONELLA, ISOLATED FROM CLINICAL MATERIAL AND AQUATIC ENVIRONMENT IN ROSTOV REGION].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271088
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2015 Nov-Dec;(6):90-3
Publication Type
Article
Author
O P Panasovets
A V Usatkin
O A Shmailenko
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2015 Nov-Dec;(6):90-3
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Deoxyribonucleases - genetics - metabolism
Disk Diffusion Antimicrobial Tests
Drug Resistance, Bacterial
Epidemiological Monitoring
Gene Expression
Hemolysis
Humans
Mice
Rivers - microbiology
Russia - epidemiology
Salmonella - drug effects - growth & development - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Salmonella Infections - epidemiology - microbiology - pathology
Salmonella Infections, Animal - microbiology - mortality - pathology
Survival Analysis
Virulence
Virulence Factors - genetics - metabolism
Abstract
Study biological properties of salmonella, isolated from clinical materials and water of Don river.
Salmonella strains of various serovars were used in the study. Biochemical characteristics were studied by generally accepted methods, antigenic properties were evaluated in agglutination reactions, virulence was determined by Dlm for laboratory animals, antibiotics sensitivity was verified by disc-diffusion method.
The presence of pathogenicity factors in isolated strains was shown: hemolytic activity--in 64 and 36.8% of cases, DNAse activity--in 28 and 26%, respectively in clinical and wild strains. Microorganism dose, resulting in death of all the animals (LD100) did not depend on serovar of salmonella and varied from 10(3) to 10(10) PFU/ml.
Clinical strains were established to possess higher virulence and resistance to antibiotics compared with strains isolated from the aquatic envionment.
PubMed ID
26950996 View in PubMed
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[Biological screening of the level of anthropogenic environmental pollution and its hazard for the health of the population].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213219
Source
Tsitologiia. 1996;38(4-5):555-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
G G Kornienko
A A Kozhin
Source
Tsitologiia. 1996;38(4-5):555-9
Date
1996
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Drug-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Adult
Animals
Environmental health
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Environmental Pollution - adverse effects - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Epidemiological Monitoring
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Male
Micronucleus Tests - methods
Rana ridibunda
Reproduction - drug effects
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
A possibility was examined to use a screening cytogenetic method for calculating micronuclei in frog blood cells as an indicator of the degree of environmental pollution and its hazard to human health. Data obtained correlate with an increased rate of reproductive function disorders in women and congenital malformations in children, living in regions where the cytologic studies of biological objects were carried out. The informational value of biogeochemical screening with the use of test objects for the assessment of the region ecological imbalance is stressed.
PubMed ID
8966757 View in PubMed
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Canadian poison control centres: preliminary assessment of their potential as a resource for public health surveillance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106641
Source
Clin Toxicol (Phila). 2013 Nov;51(9):886-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
M. Durigon
C. Elliott
R. Purssell
T. Kosatsky
Author Affiliation
Canadian Field Epidemiology Program, Public Health Agency of Canada , Ottawa, ON , Canada.
Source
Clin Toxicol (Phila). 2013 Nov;51(9):886-91
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Canada - epidemiology
Capacity Building - economics
Epidemiological Monitoring - veterinary
Government Programs - economics
Health Impact Assessment
Humans
Poison Control Centers - economics - manpower
Poisoning - economics - epidemiology - veterinary
Public Health Surveillance
Questionnaires
Abstract
In the United States (US) and Europe, surveillance based on calls to poison control centres has identified new hazards and evolving exposure trends. In Canada, the value of poison control centre calls as a tool for health hazard surveillance is largely unrecognized.
This preliminary survey was undertaken to describe current operational characteristics and surveillance capacities at Canadian poison control centres and to determine potential for developing a Canadian poison control centre collaborative network.
A structured quantitative-qualitative survey was administered to medical directors and clinical supervisors at the five Canadian poison control centres between March and May, 2012.
All five Canadian poison control centres operate 24/7 with each serving more than one province/territory. Annual call volumes range from 10,000 to 58,000. Data analysis is limited to detection of previously unrecognized hazards and short-term event-based adverse health monitoring. Currently no centre maintains systematic ongoing collection, integration and analysis of data. Constraints on personnel, resources and funding were identified as barriers to increasing capacity to provide and analyse call data.
The potential exists to use Canadian poison control data as a novel source of public health surveillance. That they serve as sentinels for new or unexpected exposure events, have real-time electronic call-record capacity and demonstrate an interest in developing and sharing their call-record information supports their integration into existing public health networks.
PubMed ID
24134535 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence following chlorophenol exposure in a community in southern Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223846
Source
Arch Environ Health. 1992 May-Jun;47(3):167-75
Publication Type
Article
Author
P. Lampi
T. Hakulinen
T. Luostarinen
E. Pukkala
L. Teppo
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute-Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Arch Environ Health. 1992 May-Jun;47(3):167-75
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Chlorophenols
Environmental monitoring
Epidemiological Monitoring
Finland - epidemiology
Fishes
Humans
Incidence
Industry
Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin - chemically induced - epidemiology
Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Residence Characteristics
Risk factors
Sarcoma - chemically induced - epidemiology
Soft Tissue Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Water Pollution, Chemical - adverse effects
Water Supply - standards
Wood
Abstract
Chlorophenols have contaminated the drinking water system and the local lake in the village of Järvelä in southern Finland. Local geology, ground water streams, and chemical analyses incriminated a local sawmill as the only plausible source of exposure. Cancer incidence in the municipality of Kärkölä (half of the population lives in Järvelä), compared with the rest of the local health-care district and with the greater cancer control region, indicated an excess of soft-tissue sarcomas and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. A case-control study, which focused on cancers of the colon, bladder and soft tissues, lymphomas, and leukemia, demonstrated a significantly elevated risk ratio for non-Hodgkin's lymphomas among persons who consumed fish from the local lake, which was contaminated with chlorophenols. Probable exposure to chlorophenol-contaminated drinking water played a role in the increased incidence of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas and possibly was a factor in the development of soft-tissue sarcoma.
PubMed ID
1596099 View in PubMed
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Chemical contaminants and parasites: assessment of human health risks associated with consumption of whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) from two boreal lakes in northern Saskatchewan, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125914
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2012 May 1;424:97-103
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1-2012
Author
Olesya Hursky
Michael Pietrock
Author Affiliation
Toxicology Centre, University of Saskatchewan, 44 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, SK, Canada S7N 5B3.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2012 May 1;424:97-103
Date
May-1-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Chromatography, Gas
Environmental Exposure
Environmental monitoring
Epidemiological Monitoring
Fish Diseases - epidemiology - parasitology
Food contamination - analysis
Food Parasitology
Humans
Indians, North American
Lakes
Mass Spectrometry
Prevalence
Risk assessment
Salmonidae - metabolism - parasitology
Saskatchewan - epidemiology
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
In Canada there is increasing concern about potential effects of industrial activities on wildlife and human health. In an interdisciplinary study concentrations of inorganic (metals, metalloids) and organic (PCBs, organochlorine pesticides) contaminants, and parasitic infections of lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) from Montreal and Reindeer lakes, Saskatchewan, were investigated to assess human health risk related to fish consumption. In both lakes contamination of fish with chemical substances and compounds, respectively, were very low and often close to detection limits. Lake whitefish parasite communities consisted of 15 (Montreal Lake) and 12 (Reindeer Lake) species most of which were found in the intestinal tract. Many parasite species showed seasonal differences in prevalence and/or mean intensity of infection. None of the identified parasites are known to be human-pathogenic and overall, whitefish from both locations can be considered safe and healthy food. Nevertheless, women of child-bearing age and young children should limit their consumption to 3 and 2 meals, respectively, of Reindeer Lake whitefish per week to minimize potentially harmful exposure to mercury. As well, intestines of Montreal Lake fish should be removed prior to fish consumption if large parasite cysts containing a yet unidentified cestode species are detected.
PubMed ID
22440886 View in PubMed
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A comparison of extended spectrum ß-lactamase producing Escherichia coli from clinical, recreational water and wastewater samples associated in time and location.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286839
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(10):e0186576
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Silje B Jørgensen
Arne V Søraas
Lotte S Arnesen
Truls M Leegaard
Arnfinn Sundsfjord
Pål A Jenum
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(10):e0186576
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Bathing Beaches
Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial
Epidemiological Monitoring
Escherichia coli - drug effects - genetics - growth & development - isolation & purification
Escherichia coli Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Fresh Water - microbiology
Gene Expression
Genome, Bacterial
High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing
Humans
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Multilocus Sequence Typing
Norway - epidemiology
Recreation
Urinary Tract Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Waste Water - microbiology
Water Microbiology
beta-Lactamases - genetics
Abstract
Extended spectrum ß-lactamase producing Escherichia coli (ESBL-EC) are excreted via effluents and sewage into the environment where they can re-contaminate humans and animals. The aim of this observational study was to detect and quantify ESBL-EC in recreational water and wastewater, and perform a genetic and phenotypic comparative analysis of the environmental strains with geographically associated human urinary ESBL-EC. Recreational fresh- and saltwater samples from four different beaches and wastewater samples from a nearby sewage plant were filtered and cultured on differential and ESBL-selective media. After antimicrobial susceptibility testing and multi-locus variable number of tandem repeats assay (MLVA), selected ESBL-EC strains from recreational water were characterized by whole genome sequencing (WGS) and compared to wastewater and human urine isolates from people living in the same area. We detected ESBL-EC in recreational water samples on 8/20 occasions (40%), representing all sites. The ratio of ESBL-EC to total number of E. coli colony forming units varied from 0 to 3.8%. ESBL-EC were present in all wastewater samples in ratios of 0.56-0.75%. ST131 was most prevalent in urine and wastewater samples, while ST10 dominated in water samples. Eight STs and identical ESBL-EC MLVA-types were detected in all compartments. Clinical ESBL-EC isolates were more likely to be multidrug-resistant (p
Notes
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PubMed ID
29040337 View in PubMed
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97 records – page 1 of 10.