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Thawing of permafrost may disturb historic cattle burial grounds in East Siberia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129387
Source
Glob Health Action. 2011;4:74-79.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
  1 document  
Author
Boris A Revich
Marina A Podolnaya
Author Affiliation
Institute of Forecasting, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russian Federation. revich@ecfor.ru
Source
Glob Health Action. 2011;4:74-79.
Date
2011
Language
English
Geographic Location
Russia
Publication Type
Article
File Size
405359
Keywords
Animals
Anthrax - epidemiology - transmission - veterinary
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Bacillus anthracis - growth & development - pathogenicity
Cattle - microbiology
Cemeteries
Climate change
Deer - microbiology
Disease Outbreaks - veterinary
Environmental monitoring
Epidemiological Monitoring
Humans
Ice
Siberia - epidemiology
Transition Temperature
Zoonoses
Abstract
Climate warming in the Arctic may increase the risk of zoonoses due to expansion of vector habitats, improved chances of vector survival during winter, and permafrost degradation. Monitoring of soil temperatures at Siberian cryology control stations since 1970 showed correlations between air temperatures and the depth of permafrost layer that thawed during summer season. Between 1900s and 1980s, the temperature of surface layer of permafrost increased by 2-4°C; and a further increase of 3°C is expected. Frequent outbreaks of anthrax caused death of 1.5 million deer in Russian North between 1897 and 1925. Anthrax among people or cattle has been reported in 29,000 settlements of the Russian North, including more than 200 Yakutia settlements, which are located near the burial grounds of cattle that died from anthrax. Statistically significant positive trends in annual average temperatures were established in 8 out of 17 administrative districts of Yakutia for which sufficient meteorological data were available. At present, it is not known whether further warming of the permafrost will lead to the release of viable anthrax organisms. Nevertheless, we suggest that it would be prudent to undertake careful monitoring of permafrost conditions in all areas where an anthrax outbreak had occurred in the past.
Notes
Cites: Adv Gerontol. 2009;22(2):253-819947388
PubMed ID
22114567 View in PubMed
Documents

Revich-Vulnerable_populations.pdf

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