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Absolute and attributable risk of venous thromboembolism in women on combined cyproterone acetate and ethinylestradiol.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184568
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2003 Jul;25(7):575-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2003
Author
Øjvind Lidegaard
Author Affiliation
Danish Centre for Human Reproductive Epidemiology (DaHRE), Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Herlev University Hospital, Copenhagen County, Denmark.
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2003 Jul;25(7):575-7
Date
Jul-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Contraceptives, Oral, Combined - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Cyproterone Acetate - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Denmark - epidemiology
Epidemiologic Studies
Ethinyl Estradiol - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Thromboembolism - chemically induced - epidemiology
Venous Thrombosis - chemically induced - epidemiology
Abstract
To achieve absolute risk estimates of venous thromboembolism (VTE) among women on cyproterone acetate plus ethinylestradiol (CPA/EE), and among women on combined oral contraceptives (COCs).
From the Danish National Register of Patients (NRP), 1996 to 1998, the records of 1.1 million Danish women, ages 15 to 44 years, were searched for evidence of VTE. COC use was ascertained through mailed questionnaires. Sales statistics of COCs and CPA/EE were provided through Danish Drug Statistics.
During the time frame of the study, 330 women were found to have had VTE while on COCs. Of these women, 67 were on levonorgestrel-containing COCs. Eleven were on CPA/EE. The corresponding absolute risk of VTE was 3.4 (range, 3.1-3.8) per 10 000 women years among the women on COCs, 4.2 (range, 3.2-5.2) per 10 000 women years among women on levonorgestrel-containing COCs, and 3.1 (range, 1.3-4.9) per 10 000 women years among the women on CPA/EE.
Our results suggest the absolute risk of VTE among Danish women on COCs is similar to that among women taking CPA/EE.
PubMed ID
12851669 View in PubMed
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Accommodation of additional non-randomly sampled cases in a study of Helicobacter pylori infection in families.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29334
Source
Stat Med. 2005 Dec 30;24(24):4045-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-30-2005
Author
Mårten Kivi
Anna L V Johansson
Agus Salim
Ylva Tindberg
Marie Reilly
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics (MEB), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Stat Med. 2005 Dec 30;24(24):4045-54
Date
Dec-30-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Epidemiologic Studies
Family
Helicobacter Infections - epidemiology
Helicobacter pylori - pathogenicity
Humans
Logistic Models
Patient Selection
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Epidemiological studies with two-stage designs typically gather information about some covariates from all study subjects in the first sampling stage, while additional data from only a subset of the subjects are collected in the second sampling stage. Appropriate analysis of two-stage studies maintains validity and can also improve precision. We describe an application of a weighted likelihood method, mean-score logistic regression, to accommodate data from a cross-sectional study of Helicobacter pylori infection in children, where the study sample was enriched with additional non-randomly sampled cases. The present work exemplifies how careful analysis of epidemiological data from complex sampling schemes can adjust for potential selection bias, improve precision and enable a more complete investigation of factors of interest. Our results highlight the importance of H. pylori infected mothers and siblings as risk factors for the infection in children in Sweden.
PubMed ID
16320286 View in PubMed
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[Activity-based registration of computer use in epidemiological studies. Danish Society of Occupational and Environmental Medicine].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175240
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2005 Mar 21;167(12-13):1377
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-21-2005

[Acute myocardial infarction in Denmark. Incidence development and prognosis during a 20-year period]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54012
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2000 Oct 30;162(44):5918-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-30-2000
Author
M. Madsen
S. Rasmussen
K. Juel
Author Affiliation
Statens Institut for Folkesundhed, København. mm@dike.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2000 Oct 30;162(44):5918-23
Date
Oct-30-2000
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Comparative Study
Denmark - epidemiology
English Abstract
Epidemiologic Studies
Female
Humans
Incidence
International Cooperation
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Patient Admission
Prognosis
Registries
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: The paper describes the epidemiology of acute myocardial infarction in Denmark. The study provides statistics on mortality, incidence and case-fatality for 1996 and the time trend since 1978. The results are compared to the results from the international MONICA study. METHOD: The analyses are based on national population-based registers on causes of death and hospital admissions. RESULTS: The mortality from ischaemic heart disease has declined considerably. The study confirms that the decline in mortality can be ascribed to a decrease in incidence as well as a decrease in case fatality. In the period 1985-1996 the incidence decreased by 3.5% per year for men and 2.5% for women. Mortality rates within 28 days after admission to hospital with MI was almost constant until 1988 following which there was a significant drop. Despite the improved prognosis for MI patients, one quarter die before admission to hospital, and one quarter die within one year after an MI. DISCUSSION: The incidence rates of MI based on the national population-based registers are consistent with the results from the Danish MONICA study. The reduction in incidence rates is a little smaller than the results in the Danish part of the MONICA study, whereas the marked reduction in case-fatality found in this study is not in agreement with the results from MONICA. This discrepancy is not yet understood. The declining trend in case fatality started in 1988 and may be related to the introduction of thrombolysis and acetylsalcylic acid treatment.
PubMed ID
11094552 View in PubMed
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Adjusting distributions of the Health Utilities Index Mark 3 utility scores of health-related quality of life.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186345
Source
Qual Life Res. 2003 Feb;12(1):11-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2003
Author
Jian Sun
Author Affiliation
Institute of Health Economics, Edmonton, AB, Canada. jsun@ihe.ab.ca
Source
Qual Life Res. 2003 Feb;12(1):11-20
Date
Feb-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Employment
Epidemiologic Studies
Health Status Indicators
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Quality of Life
Self-Assessment
Abstract
The Health Utilities Index Mark 3 (HUI3) is a multi-dimensional, preference-based measure of health status and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). HUI3 scores correlate strongly with self-ratings of health status and functional disability and vary according to age, gender and occupation. In comparative studies relating to HRQoL, it is necessary to carry out adjusted comparison of the health status of the different groups. taking into account unbalanced distribution of confounding variables. This paper describes a stratification method to adjust the distributions of HUI3 scores. This method provides a graphical representation of adjusted distribution of HUI3, which can also be used to adjust other HRQoL scores. Cross-sectional data from the 1998/1999 National Population Health Survey (NPHS) in Canada were used to verify the proposed method. Male agriculture workers and male construction workers in Canada had quite different age distributions but similar HUI3 distributions. After adjusting the age distribution of the construction group to match the distribution of agriculture group, the mean HUI3 score of the former significantly decreased.
PubMed ID
12625514 View in PubMed
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Admission blood glucose and short term survival in primary intracerebral haemorrhage: a population based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176129
Source
J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2005 Mar;76(3):349-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2005
Author
R. Fogelholm
K. Murros
A. Rissanen
S. Avikainen
Author Affiliation
Pappilantie 10 B 8, 02400 Kirkkonummi, Finland. r.fogel@kolumbus.fi
Source
J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2005 Mar;76(3):349-53
Date
Mar-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Blood Glucose - analysis
Cerebral Hemorrhage - mortality - pathology
Diabetes Complications - mortality - pathology
Epidemiologic Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Retrospective Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Survival Analysis
Abstract
The role of admission blood glucose level on the prognosis of patients with intracerebral haemorrhage has not been elucidated.
To examine this association on the basis of an epidemiologically representative patient material.
249 500 people living in the catchment area of the Central Hospital of Central Finland. The diagnosis of ICH was established if verified by cranial computed tomography (CT) or autopsy.
Of the 416 patients who fulfilled the diagnostic criteria, 30 died before admission and 386 were admitted to the Central Hospital. All 329 patients (290 nondiabetics and 39 diabetics) with both admission blood glucose and cranial CT data were included in the study. The mean blood glucose level was 10.6 mmol/l for nondiabetics who died on the day of onset, 8.6 mmol/l for those dying during days 1 to 28, and 6.8 mmol/l for the 28 day survivors. The corresponding figures for diabetics were 13.9 mmol/l, 12.5 mmol/l, and 9.3 mmol/l. In both nondiabetics and diabetics, patients who died had significantly higher mean glucose than the 28 day survivors (p
Notes
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PubMed ID
15716524 View in PubMed
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Aging and the occurrence of dementia: findings from a population-based cohort with a large sample of nonagenarians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52582
Source
Arch Neurol. 1999 May;56(5):587-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1999
Author
E. von Strauss
M. Viitanen
D. De Ronchi
B. Winblad
L. Fratiglioni
Author Affiliation
Stockholm Gerontology Research Center, Division of Geriatric Medicine, Neurotec, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. Eva.von.Strauss@neurotec.ki.se
Source
Arch Neurol. 1999 May;56(5):587-92
Date
May-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - psychology
Dementia - epidemiology - psychology
Epidemiologic Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
CONTEXT: In spite of numerous studies on the occurrence of dementia, many questions remain, such as the relation between age, aging, and dementing disorders. This question is relevant both for understanding the pathogenetic mechanism of the dementias and for the public health prospective because of the increasing number of 85-year-old or older persons in our population. OBJECTIVE: To estimate the occurrence of dementia in the very old, including nonagenarians, in relation to age, gender, and different dementia types. DESIGN: An epidemiological survey where all participants were clinically examined by physicians, assessed by psychologists, and interviewed by nurses. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Revised Third Edition (DSM-III-R) criteria for dementia were followed. A category of "questionable dementia" was added when all criteria were not fulfilled. A double diagnostic procedure was used for all subjects. SETTING: Community-based population, including all inhabitants of 2 areas in central Stockholm, Sweden (N = 1848). PARTICIPANTS: Of the 1848 subjects in the study population, 168 (9.1%) had died and 56 (3%) moved before examination. Of the remaining subjects, 1424 (87.7%) were examined, and the refusal rate was 12.3%. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Age- and gender-specific prevalence figures, and gender- and education-adjusted odds ratios were used. RESULTS: At the end of the diagnostic procedure, 358 clinically definite cases of dementia and 101 questionable cases of dementia were identified. Alzheimer disease (AD) contributed to 76.5%, and vascular dementia (VaD) to 17.9%. The prevalence of dementia increases from 13% in the 77- to 84-year-old subjects to 48% among persons 95 years and older (from 18% to 61% when questionable cases were included). The odds ratio for subjects 90 to 94 years and 95 years and older in comparison with 77- to 84-year-old subjects was 3.7 (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.7-5.1) and 6.5 (95% CI, 3.9-10.8) for dementia, 4.8 (95% CI, 3.3-7.0) and 8.0 (95% CI, 4.6-14.0) for persons with AD, 2.3 (95% CI, 1.3-4.2) and 4.6 (95% CI, 1.9-11.2) for VaD, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Dementia prevalence continues to increase even in the most advanced ages. This increase is especially evident among women and is more clear for AD. We believe that our prevalence data reflect the differential distribution of dementia risk.
PubMed ID
10328254 View in PubMed
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Alaska native suicide: lessons for elder suicide.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3656
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 1998 Jun;10(2):205-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1998
Author
P. Kettl
Author Affiliation
Penn State University College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania, USA.
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 1998 Jun;10(2):205-11
Date
Jun-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alaska - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Epidemiologic Studies
European Continental Ancestry Group - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Incidence
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Infant
Inuits - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Sex Distribution
Socioeconomic Factors
Suicide - ethnology
Abstract
Suicide rates in Alaska Native elders are studied to further explore cultural factors in elderly suicide. Data for the 1960s and 1970s are reviewed, and new data on Alaska Native suicide rates are presented for the 10-year period of 1985 through 1994. In many areas throughout the world, suicide rates are the highest for the elderly. During the Alaska "oil boom," suicide rates more than tripled for the general population but decreased to zero for Alaska Native elders. Cultural teachings from the society's elders were more important during this time of culture upheaval. During the study period, the cultural changes dissipated, and suicide rates for Alaska Native elders, although lower than those of White Alaskans, increased. This provides further evidence that suicide rates for elders can be influenced by social factors--both to raise to lower rates.
PubMed ID
9677507 View in PubMed
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Alaskan Natives and alcohol: A sociocultural and epidemiological review

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102401
Source
Pages 223-238 of Alcohol use among U.S. ethnic minorities, a research monograph published by U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services.
Publication Type
Report
Date
Sep-1985
the many differences in drinking patterns among Native communities. At rust, State policy regarded alcoholism solely as an individual problem to be solved by treatment, but later incorporated a community-wide response involving measures of local control. Epidemiological studies have documented the
  1 document  
Author
Kelso, D
DuBay, W
Author Affiliation
University of Alaska, Anchorage
Source
Pages 223-238 of Alcohol use among U.S. ethnic minorities, a research monograph published by U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services.
Date
Sep-1985
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
1799783
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska Natives
Alcohol
Colonization
Community responses
Consumption
Epidemiological studies
Federal healthcare system
Mortality
Social indicators
Suicide
Abstract
The authors review the sociocultural and epidemiological literature about Alaskan Natives and alcohol in the context of Alaska's history and political development. For nearly two centuries, the drinking patterns of Alaskan Natives were attributed to racial deficiencies and used to justify the prohibition against drinking. Beginning in the early 1950s, sociocultural studies of Native drinking challenged racial explanations by describing the many differences in drinking patterns among Native communities. At first, state policy regarded alcoholism solely as an individual problem to be solved by treatment, but later incorporated a community-wide response involving measures of local control. Epidemiological studies have documented the high toll taken by alcohol abuse, which is now the worst health problem for Alaskan Natives. A variety of governmental instruments are now available to Alaskan Native communities for establishing control over the use of alcohol and for establishing alcohol-related programs. Future studies will determine the effects of self-determination on Alaskan Natives and alcohol.
Documents

AKNativesAlcoholSocEpiReview.pdf

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