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927 records – page 1 of 93.

[3 cases of viral carriage detected during screening for HIV antibodies].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226768
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1991 Mar;(3):16-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1991
Author
E M Shelukhina
E V Chekunova
G R Matsevich
I A Okunev
S S Marennikova
M R Zak
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1991 Mar;(3):16-8
Date
Mar-1991
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - epidemiology - immunology - prevention & control
Blood Donors
Carrier State - epidemiology - immunology - prevention & control
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
HIV Antibodies - blood
HIV Seropositivity - epidemiology - immunology
HIV-1 - immunology
Humans
Immunoblotting
Lithuania - epidemiology
Mass Screening - methods
Moscow - epidemiology
Risk factors
Abstract
The results of screening more than 23,000 serum samples from persons belonging to risk groups, as well as those not belonging to such groups, in Moscow, Vilnius and Klaipeda are presented. Screening was carried out with the use of an assay system manufactured by the Scientific and Industrial Amalgamation "Antigen" (USSR). In this screening 3 HIV carriers were detected; of these, 2 were foreign students from two African countries.
PubMed ID
1872091 View in PubMed
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25(OH)D levels in trained versus sedentary university students at 64° north.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290407
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1314414
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Date
2017
Author
Scott P Jerome
Kendra D Sticka
Theresia M Schnurr
Sally J Mangum
Arleigh J Reynolds
Kriya L Dunlap
Author Affiliation
a Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry , University of Alaska Fairbanks , Fairbanks , AK , USA.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1314414
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Arctic Regions
Athletes - statistics & numerical data
Body Weights and Measures
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Dietary Supplements
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Humans
Male
Metabolic Equivalent
Sedentary lifestyle
Students
Sunlight
Universities
Vitamin D - administration & dosage
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) deficiency is associated with compromised bone mineralisation, fatigue, suppressed immune function and unsatisfactory skeletal muscle recovery. We investigated the risk of 25(OH)D insufficiency or deficiency in endurance athletes compared to sedentary non-athletes living at 64° north.
University student-athletes (TS) and sedentary students (SS) volunteered to participate in this study. TS engaged in regular exercise while SS exercised no more than 20 minutes/week. Metabolic Equivalent of Task (MET) scores for participants were determined. Vitamin D intake was assessed using the National Cancer Institute's 24-hour food recall (ASA24). Fasting plasma 25(OH)D levels were quantified via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.
TS reported higher activity levels than SS as assessed with MET-minutes/week and ranking of physical activity levels (p
Notes
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PubMed ID
28452288 View in PubMed
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Absence of evidence of Borna disease virus infection in Swedish patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200265
Source
J Neurovirol. 1999 Oct;5(5):495-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1999
Author
B. Evengård
T. Briese
G. Lindh
S. Lee
W I Lipkin
Author Affiliation
Department of Immunology, Microbiology, Pathology and Infectious Diseases, Clinic for Infectious Diseases, Karolinska Institutet at Huddinge University Hospital.
Source
J Neurovirol. 1999 Oct;5(5):495-9
Date
Oct-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Blotting, Western
Borna Disease - virology
Borna disease virus - immunology - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic - virology
Female
Humans
Leukocytes, Mononuclear - chemistry - metabolism - virology
Male
Middle Aged
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Sweden
Abstract
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) is characterized by debilitating fatigue, somatic symptoms and cognitive impairment. An infectious basis has been proposed; candidate agents include enteroviruses, herpesviruses, retroviruses and Borna disease virus (BDV), a novel neurotropic virus associated with neuropsychiatric disorders. Sera and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from Swedish CFS patients were assayed for evidence of infection using ELISA and Western immunoblot for detection of antibodies to BDV proteins N, P and gp18; and using nested reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for detection of BDV N- and P-gene transcripts. No specific immunoreactivity to BDV proteins was found in sera from 169 patients or 62 controls. No BDV N- or P-gene transcripts were found through RT-PCR analysis of PBMC from 18 patients with severe CFS. These results do not support a role for BDV in pathogenesis of CFS.
PubMed ID
10568886 View in PubMed
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Absence of indigenous specific West Nile virus antibodies in Tyrolean blood donors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134646
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2012 Jan;31(1):77-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
S T Sonnleitner
J. Simeoni
E. Schmutzhard
M. Niedrig
F. Ploner
H. Schennach
M P Dierich
G. Walder
Author Affiliation
Hygiene and Medical Microbiology, Medical University Innsbruck, Fritz Pregl Straße 1-3/III, Innsbruck, Austria. sissyson@gmx.at
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2012 Jan;31(1):77-81
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Blood Donors
Child, Preschool
Encephalitis Viruses, Tick-Borne - immunology
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Europe
False Positive Reactions
Female
Humans
Italy
Male
Middle Aged
Neutralization Tests
West Nile Fever - diagnosis - epidemiology - virology
West Nile virus - immunology
Abstract
In the last several years, West Nile virus (WNV) was proven to be present especially in the neighboring countries of Austria, such as Italy, Hungary, and the Czech Republic, as well as in eastern parts of Austria, where it was detected in migratory and domestic birds. In summer 2010, infections with WNV were reported from Romania and northern Greece with about 150 diseased and increasingly fatal cases. We tested the sera of 1,607 blood donors from North Tyrol (Austria) and South Tyrol (Italy) for antibodies against WNV by using IgG enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Initial results of the ELISA tests showed seroprevalence rates of 46.2% in North Tyrol and 0.5% in South Tyrol, which turned out to be false-positive cross-reactions with antibodies against tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) by adjacent neutralization assays. These results indicate that seropositivity against WNV requires confirmation by neutralization assays, as cross-reactivity with TBEV is frequent and because, currently, WNV is not endemic in the study area.
PubMed ID
21556676 View in PubMed
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[A case of Lyme borreliosis which was suspected to be caused by Borrelia japonica infection in Shizuoka, Japan]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34907
Source
Kansenshogaku Zasshi. 1996 Mar;70(3):264-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1996
Author
T. Masuzawa
Y. Yanagihara
H. Fujita
Author Affiliation
Department of Microbiology, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka, Japan.
Source
Kansenshogaku Zasshi. 1996 Mar;70(3):264-7
Date
Mar-1996
Language
Japanese
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antibodies, Bacterial - analysis
Borrelia - immunology
Borrelia Infections - immunology - microbiology
Child
English Abstract
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Humans
Japan
Lyme Disease - immunology - microbiology
Abstract
We report a case of Lyme borreliosis (Lyme disease) found in Shizuoka City, Japan which was suspected to be caused by Borrelia japonica infection. A 8-year-old female was bitten on her head by a tick at a camping ground, near Tamagawa, Shizuoka. The tick was removed by the patient and was discarded before species identification. After one week, lymph node swelling with tenderness developed on her left neck. She consulted a local pediatrician and was suspected to have upper respiratory infection. As oral antibiotic, cefaclor was not effective, the patient was referred to us. The patient's serum showed positive reaction with Lyme Borreliosis ELISA kit (Dakopatts, Denmark) using Borrelia burgdorferi flagellum as antigen. The serum also gave positive results with home-made ELISA to B. japonica strain IKA2, which was isolated from I. ovatus, but not with other borrelial strain isolated in the United States, Europe, and from I. persulcatus and wild rodent in Japan. In western blotting, the serum reacted with flagellin and outer surface protein A (OspA) of B. japonica. We diagnosed her as Lyme disease and got a successful result with oral penicillin, sultamicillin. From a result of our field tick survey, we have not collected I. persulcatus around the area where the patient had a tick bite. These findings indicated that Lyme disease was caused by B. japonica infection with I. ovatus bite.
PubMed ID
8621970 View in PubMed
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Accelerated decline in Helicobacter pylori seroprevalence rate during the screen and treat project in Vammala, Finland, as demonstrated in 29- to 45-year-old pregnant women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181548
Source
APMIS. 2004 Jan;112(1):34-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2004
Author
Leena Rehnberg-Laiho
Anniina Salomaa
Hilpi Rautelin
Pentti Koskela
Seppo Sarna
Timo U Kosunen
Author Affiliation
Department of Bacteriology and Immunology, Haartman Institute, Haartmaninkatu 3, 00014 University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
APMIS. 2004 Jan;112(1):34-8
Date
Jan-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Helicobacter Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Helicobacter pylori - isolation & purification
Humans
Middle Aged
Pilot Projects
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - epidemiology - microbiology
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Stomach Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Urban Population
Abstract
The potential preventability of serious helicobacter-associated diseases - especially gastric cancer - has evoked interest in eradicating this pathogen from the population. We assessed the efficacy of the pioneering screen and treat intervention project in Vammala by studying helicobacter seroprevalence in pregnant women representing the normal population. Consecutive maternity clinic samples from native Finnish females at five different localities in 1995 (n=701) and 2000 (n=772) were investigated for class IgG H. pylori antibodies by enzyme immunoassay (Pyloriset EIA-G III, Orion Diagnostica, Espoo, Finland). In Vammala the change in helicobacter seroprevalence was -13%-units (between 1995 and 2000; p=0.0125, chi-square test) in > or =29-year-old females, +1.6%-units (difference statistically non-significant) in
PubMed ID
14961972 View in PubMed
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Acceptance and outcome of herpes simplex virus type 2 antibody testing in patients attending an STD clinic--recognized and unrecognized infections.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70622
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2005;85(3):248-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Gun-Britt Löwhagen
Matilda Berntsson
Ellen Bonde
Petra Tunbäck
Ingela Krantz
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, SE-413 45 Göteborg, Sweden. gun-britt.lowhagen@vgregion.se
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2005;85(3):248-52
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antibodies, Viral - analysis
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Herpes Genitalis - blood - epidemiology - prevention & control
Herpesvirus 2, Human - immunology - isolation & purification
Humans
Male
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Questionnaires
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Sexually Transmitted Diseases - blood - epidemiology - prevention & control
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The majority of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) genital infections are asymptomatic. We wanted to evaluate the acceptance of HSV-2 antibody testing among people attending an STD clinic and to estimate, after counselling, the percentage of recognized and unrecognized HSV-2 infections. First visitors to an STD clinic were invited to participate by answering a questionnaire and taking a blood test for HSV-2 antibodies. HSV-2 seropositive individuals, who were unaware of having genital herpes, were offered an HSV-2 counselling visit and follow-up. Of 1769 patients offered testing, 57% accepted. Of 152 (15%) HSV-2 seropositive individuals, 41% had a self-reported history of genital herpes, approximately 30% had genital symptoms and 30% had no genital symptoms. The percentage of patients reporting genital symptoms was much higher in HSV-2 seropositives (45%) without a history of genital herpes than in an HSV-2 seronegative group (28%). HSV-2 antibody testing should be performed generously in all cases of uncharacteristic genital symptoms.
PubMed ID
16040412 View in PubMed
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The accuracy of serologic diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection in school-aged children of mixed ethnicity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32221
Source
Helicobacter. 2001 Mar;6(1):24-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2001
Author
Y. Tindberg
C. Bengtsson
M. Bergström
M. Granström
Author Affiliation
Sachs' Department of Pediatrics, Södersjukhuset, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Ylva.Tindberg@mep.ki.se
Source
Helicobacter. 2001 Mar;6(1):24-30
Date
Mar-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Antigens, Bacterial - metabolism
Bacterial Proteins - metabolism
Breath Tests
Child
Comparative Study
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Evaluation Studies
Female
Helicobacter Infections - diagnosis - ethnology
Helicobacter pylori - metabolism
Humans
Immunoblotting
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sensitivity and specificity
Serologic Tests - methods
Sweden - epidemiology
Urea - analysis
Abstract
The present study evaluated two non-invasive diagnostic methods for H. pylori infection in children, i.e. an in-house ELISA using sonicated Campylobacter jejuni antigen for absorption of cross-reacting antibodies and an immunoblot kit (Helico Blot 2.0, Genelabs, Singapore). 13C -Urea breath test (13C-UBT) was used as reference METHOD: Sera and questionnaires were collected from 695/858 (81%) Swedish school children with mixed ethnic backgrounds within a cross-sectional, community-based study. Of 133 children with an ELISA OD value of > or = 0.1, all were screened with immunoblot and 107 made a 13C-UBT. The negative controls were 34/37 children from three school classes with an ELISA OD value of
PubMed ID
11328362 View in PubMed
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[A comparative evaluation of the diagnostic value of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide and rheumatoid factor in rheumatoid arthritis]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93534
Source
Korean J Lab Med. 2008 Feb;28(1):39-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
Cho Sun Young
Kang So Young
Lee Hee Joo
Lee Woo In
Author Affiliation
Department of Laboratory Medicine, East-West Neo-Medical Center, School of Medicine, Kyung-Hee University, Seoul, Korea.
Source
Korean J Lab Med. 2008 Feb;28(1):39-45
Date
Feb-2008
Language
Korean
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - diagnosis
Autoantibodies - blood
Biological Markers - blood
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Peptides, Cyclic - immunology
ROC Curve
Reagent kits, diagnostic
Rheumatoid Factor - blood
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Despite its unsatisfactory specificity, rheumatoid factor (RF) is the only serologic marker included in the diagnostic criteria of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) for rheumatoid arthritis. Recently, the diagnostic value of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP) antibodies has been emphasized in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) due to its high specificity. To evaluate the second generation of anti-CCP antibodies as a diagnostic marker, we evaluated anti-CCP test in 163 individuals. METHODS: The study population was divided into the following four groups: RA group (n=18), other disease group with arthritic symptoms (n=44), other disease group without arthritic symptoms (n=45), and healthy group (n=56). Anti-CCP was measured by an ELISA analyzer (Coda, Bio-Rad, USA) with Immunoscan RA (Euro-Diagnostica, Malmo, Sweden) and RF was measured by an automated chemistry analyzer (Toshiba, Japan) with RF-LATEX X1 (Denka Seiken, Japan). RESULTS: The sensitivity of anti-CCP and RF was 72.2% and 100%, respectively, and the respective figures for the specificity were 96.6% and 73%. On each ROC curve, the area under the curve was 0.867 for anti-CCP and 0.959 for RF. In other disease groups, most of the false positive cases of RF were found in the patients with hyperlipidemia or HBV carriage. However, anti-CCP was not detected in any of the patients with these two conditions. False positive rates of RF in the three control groups were 34.1% in other disease group with arthritic symptoms, 48.9% in the other disease group without arthritic symptoms, and 3.6% in healthy group. The respective figures for anti-CCP were 6.8%, 2.2%, and 1.8%. CONCLUSIONS: The specificity of anti-CCP antibodies was higher than that of RF for discriminating RA from other diseases, especially in the patients with hyperlipidemia or HBV carriage. With its high specificity, anti-CCP antibodies can play an additive role in establishing the diagnosis of RA in patients with RF positivity.
PubMed ID
18309254 View in PubMed
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Acute hepatitis A, B and non-A, non-B in a Swedish community studied over a ten-year period.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57000
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1982;14(4):253-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1982
Author
A. Widell
B G Hansson
T. Moestrup
Z. Serléus
L R Mathiesen
T. Johnsson
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1982;14(4):253-9
Date
1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cross Infection
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Epidemiologic Methods
Hepatitis A - epidemiology - immunology - transmission
Hepatitis B - epidemiology - immunology
Hepatitis C - epidemiology - immunology
Hepatitis, Viral, Human - epidemiology
Humans
Sweden
Abstract
985 episodes of hepatitis representing 98% of all acute hepatitis episodes found in a Swedish city during a 10-year period were analyzed for anti-hepatitis A IgM antibodies and hepatitis B surface antigen. Hepatitis A was diagnosed in 311 episodes (32%), hepatitis B in 494 (50%), simultaneous acute hepatitis A and B in 12 (1.2%), and 168 episodes (17%) were classified as hepatitis non-A, non-B. The majority of the hepatitis A cases were drug addicts (58%), and all were concentrated in 3 outbreaks of 1-2 years duration. 16% of all hepatitis A cases were probably imported. Hepatitis B cases decreased significantly (p less than 0.001) between the first and second half of the study period. 47% were drug addicts. Hepatitis non-A, non-B was also dominated by drug addicts (61%). Approximately 20% of the cases in all 3 types of hepatitis had no identifiable source.
PubMed ID
6819637 View in PubMed
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927 records – page 1 of 93.