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Adenocarcinoma of the prostate in perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature248080
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1978 Nov 4;119(9):1077-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-4-1978
Author
A W Bruce
D E Mahan
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1978 Nov 4;119(9):1077-84
Date
Nov-4-1978
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acid Phosphatase - blood
Adenocarcinoma - therapy
Aged
Bone Neoplasms - diagnosis
Clinical Enzyme Tests
Ethinyl Estradiol - therapeutic use
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Humans
Immunologic Techniques
Lymph Nodes - pathology
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Metastasis
Neoplasm Staging
Ontario
Prostate - pathology
Prostatic Neoplasms - pathology - therapy
Radiotherapy, High-Energy
Seminal Vesicles - pathology
Abstract
Adenocarcinoma of the prostate is responsible for one of every nine deaths from cancer in Canada. In this review epidemiologic factors are considered and current staging systems are outlined. The American Urological System is recommended for staging because of its ability to reflect changes in the understanding of the biologic behaviour of this neoplasm. The adoption of a quantitative grading scheme is suggested to complement the information obtained from the staging assessment. The routes of spread of this disease, along with the procedures used to assess metastatic involvement, are described. Immunologic methods for the analysis of prostatic acid phosphatase have been shown to be superior to the enzymatic methods previously used, and the role of the new techniques is discussed. Emphasis is placed on radiotherapy and endocrine therapy for the treatment of this neoplasm, and the concept of withholding endocrine therapy until symptoms appear is discussed. Potential future developments in this field are considered.
Notes
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PubMed ID
105800 View in PubMed
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Also with a restrictive transfusion policy, screening with second-generation anti-hepatitis C virus enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay would have reduced post-transfusion hepatitis C after open-heart surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature56831
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 1993 Jul;28(7):581-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1993
Author
U L Mathiesen
E. Karlsson
U. Foberg
A. Frydén
L. Franzén
A. Widell
G. Bodemar
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Internal Medicine, Oskarshamn Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 1993 Jul;28(7):581-4
Date
Jul-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alanine Transaminase - blood
Blood Donors
Blood Transfusion - adverse effects
Cardiac Surgical Procedures
Enzyme Tests
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Hepacivirus - immunology
Hepatitis Antibodies - analysis
Hepatitis C - diagnosis - prevention & control - transmission
Hepatitis C Antibodies
Humans
Immunoblotting
Male
Middle Aged
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
The incidence of post-transfusion hepatitis non-A, non-B (PTH-NANB) was prospectively assessed among open-heart surgery patients from the southeast region of Sweden before the introduction of antihepatitis C virus (HCV) blood donor screening. Blood samples for alanine aminotransferase analysis were drawn before and 2, 3, and 4 months after transfusion. Surgery was performed in four centres. Of 190 transfused and followed-up patients 2 (1.1%) contracted PTH-NANB, both operated on at the centre with significantly fewer transfusions than the other centres. One patient had antibodies to HCV detected by first-generation (C100-3) and later by second-generation anti-HCV enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA-2) and by positive second-generation recombinant immunoblot assay (4-RIBA). The other patient, although negative by first-generation anti-HCV ELISA, was positive by second-generation ELISA and by 4-RIBA. Both patients were hepatitis C-viremic by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). All the six donors implicated in the two hepatitis cases were first-generation anti-HCV-negative, but two, one for each patient, were positive by second-generation anti-HCV ELISA. This finding was confirmed by positive 4-RIBA in only 1 donor, the other being 'indeterminate'. However, in both donors hepatitis C viremia was found by PCR. This study shows that the second-generation anti-HCV ELISA will further reduce the risk for PTH-NANB/C and draws attention to the problem of evaluation of confirmatory tests.
PubMed ID
7689744 View in PubMed
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[Blood copper oxidase and copper content in primiparae during pregnancy and in the dynamics of labor as dependent on age]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature66272
Source
Pediatr Akus Ginekol. 1975 Jul-Aug;(4):35-7
Publication Type
Article

[Blood serum enzymatic activity in pyelonephritis in children]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature41590
Source
Pediatr Akus Ginekol. 1978 Sep-Oct;(5):19-20
Publication Type
Article

[Circadian rhythms and the risk of the development of a myocardial infarct]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54611
Source
Lik Sprava. 1996 Oct-Dec;(10-12):66-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
V K Tashchuk
O Iu Polishchuk
Ie A Menchits
M V Romaniuk
Source
Lik Sprava. 1996 Oct-Dec;(10-12):66-9
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Angina Pectoris - complications - diagnosis
Circadian Rhythm
Coronary Disease - complications - diagnosis
English Abstract
Enzyme Tests
Humans
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - diagnosis - etiology
Myocardial Ischemia - complications - diagnosis
Risk factors
Time Factors
Abstract
As many as 70 patients were examined under conditions of a cardio resuscitation unit to gain insight into relatedness of time of development of acute of myocardial infarction (AMI) to its forms and particular clinical picture. The highest risk of AMI development was recordable within the time interval of 6-12 hours with the existing dependence for morning probability of microfocal AMI, daytime probability of microfocal and transmural AMI, with significant reduction thereof within the interval of 18-24 hours. Lesser probability of AMI development within 18-24 hours was closely related to reduction of levels of aspartate aminotransferases, lactatdegidrogenases, and creatinphosphokinases in AMI patients within this time interval.
PubMed ID
9138818 View in PubMed
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70 records – page 1 of 7.