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946 records – page 1 of 95.

[2 Montreal physicians of the 19th century adept at ecologic thought].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature109629
Source
Union Med Can. 1970 Mar;99(3):487-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1970
Author
E. Desjardins
Source
Union Med Can. 1970 Mar;99(3):487-92
Date
Mar-1970
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Environmental Health - history
History, 19th Century
Humans
Quebec
PubMed ID
4908614 View in PubMed
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[4th International Symposium on arctic medicine]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4380
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1979 Feb;(2):60
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Feb-1979

7th International Symposium on Neurobehavioral Methods and Effects in Occupational and Environmental Health. 20-23 June 1999. Stockholm, Sweden. Abstracts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49214
Source
Neurotoxicology. 2000 Oct;21(5):867-910
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Oct-2000

43rd Nordic work environment meeting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49285
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1994 Dec;20(6):468-70
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Dec-1994
Author
T. Leino
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki.
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1994 Dec;20(6):468-70
Date
Dec-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Keywords
Environmental health
Humans
Norway
Occupational Health
PubMed ID
7701294 View in PubMed
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Acculturation and celiac disease risk in second-generation immigrants: a nationwide cohort study in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122335
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2012 Oct;47(10):1174-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Carl Johan Wingren
Daniel Agardh
Juan Merlo
Author Affiliation
Unit for Social Epidemiology, Department of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden. carl_johan.wingren@med.lu.se
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2012 Oct;47(10):1174-80
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Celiac Disease - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Effect
Cohort Studies
Cost of Illness
Emigrants and Immigrants - statistics & numerical data
Environmental health
Female
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Incidence
Male
Mothers - statistics & numerical data
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The burden of celiac disease (CD) is increasingly recognized as a global problem. However, whether this situation depends on genetics or environmental factors is uncertain. The authors examined these aspects in Sweden, a country in which the risk of CD is generally considered to be high. If environmental factors are relevant, CD risk in second-generation immigrant children should be related to maternal length of stay in Sweden before delivery.
Linking the Swedish Medical Birth Registry to other national registries, the authors investigated all singleton children (n = 792,401) born in Sweden between 1987 and 1993. They studied the risk of CD in children before age 6 as a function of the mother's geographical region of birth and length of stay in Sweden before delivery using Cox regression models.
In children whose mothers immigrated to Sweden from a country outside of Europe, a maternal length of stay in Sweden of more than 5 years increased the hazard ratio (HR) of CD (1.73, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.06-2.81). The authors observed a similar result among children born to mothers from a Nordic country outside of Sweden (HR 1.57, 95% CI 0.89-2.75), but a non-conclusive protective effect was observed in second-generation immigrant children from a non-Nordic European country (HR 0.65, 95% CI 0.39-1.09).
The risk of CD among second-generation immigrants seems to be conditioned by maternal length of stay in Sweden before delivery, suggesting that environmental factors contribute to the variation in CD risk observed across populations.
PubMed ID
22827636 View in PubMed
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[A concept of promoting health in the population of the circumpolar regions]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4359
Source
Vestn Ross Akad Med Nauk. 1993 Sep-Oct;(8):32-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
V I Khasnulin
Source
Vestn Ross Akad Med Nauk. 1993 Sep-Oct;(8):32-5
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Antarctic Regions
Arctic Regions
Cold Climate
Ecology
English Abstract
Environmental health
Health promotion
Health status
Humans
Siberia
Abstract
The preservation of human health in polar and circumpolar regions depends mainly on the strategy for future development of these regions. The consequences of human intervention into northern ecology are irreversible, as in the case of greenhouse effect, industrial and atomic pollutions of polar nature, tundra devastation, destruction of northern flora and fauna, etc. The ongoing creation of large-scale industrial population centers in the North due to newcomers is to be stopped. Polar regions are to be used for biospheric reservation and tourist sanitary zones, to preserve specific flora and fauna, to provide the rhythms and customs necessary to survive in extreme climatic and geophysical conditions of high latitudes. The programme for securing man's survival in circumpolar regions should comprise several stages of practical measures to provide necessary resources and to combine international efforts. The preservation of human health should be based on the understanding of the relationship between the health status and biospheric processes and the assessment of the role of human intervention into polar ecology. A programme facilitating the preservation of human health and survival in the North and in the Antarctic should be launched.
PubMed ID
7507378 View in PubMed
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946 records – page 1 of 95.