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2nd Norwegian Environmental Toxicology Symposium: joining forces for an integrated search for environmental solutions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90204
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2009;72(3-4):111
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009

6TH NORWEGIAN ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICOLOGY SYMPOSIUM: Assessing and solving environmental challenges in a multiple stressor world.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296704
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2017; 80(16-18):805-806
Publication Type
Introductory Journal Article
Date
2017
Author
Knut Erik Tollefsen
Sam Kacew
Author Affiliation
a Section for Ecotoxicology and Risk Assessment, Norwegian Institute for Water Research (NIVA) , Oslo , Norway.
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2017; 80(16-18):805-806
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Introductory Journal Article
Keywords
Ecotoxicology
Environmental Exposure
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Environmental Pollutants - toxicity
Norway
Risk Assessment - methods
PubMed ID
28829685 View in PubMed
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Abundance and diversity of human-biting flies (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae, Culicidae, Tabanidae, Simuliidae) around a nickel-copper smelter at Monchegorsk, northwestern Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169895
Source
J Vector Ecol. 2005 Dec;30(2):263-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
M V Kozlov
N K Brodskaya
A. Haarto
K. Kuusela
M. Schäfer
V. Zverev
Author Affiliation
Section ofEcology, Department ofBiology, University of Turku, FIN-20014 Turku, Finland.
Source
J Vector Ecol. 2005 Dec;30(2):263-71
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Bites and Stings - epidemiology
Ceratopogonidae - growth & development
Copper - toxicity
Culicidae - growth & development
Diptera - growth & development
Environmental Pollutants - toxicity
Humans
Nickel - toxicity
Population Density
Population Dynamics
Russia
Seasons
Simuliidae - growth & development
Species Specificity
Abstract
In the summers of 2001 and 2002, we quantitatively sampled human-biting flies in twelve sites located 1.6 to 63 km from a large copper-nickel smelter at Monchegorsk on the Kola Peninsula, Russia. We collected 429 specimens of three species of Ceratopogonidae, 92 specimens of seven species of Culicidae, 76 specimens of seven species of Tabanidae, and 4,788 specimens of 19 species of Simuliidae. Culicoides chiropterus was for the first time reported from the Kola Peninsula. Catches of Culicidae and Simuliidae decreased near the smelter, presumably due to the combined action of toxicity of pollutants, pollution-induced forest damage, and decline in vertebrate density. An abundance of Ceratopogonidae and Tabanidae, the size of the most common black fly species, Simulium pusillum, and the diversity of all families did not change along the pollution gradient.
PubMed ID
16599161 View in PubMed
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Addressing the linkage between exposure to pesticides and human health effects--research trends and priorities for research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166662
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health B Crit Rev. 2006 Nov-Dec;9(6):441-56
Publication Type
Article
Author
L. Ritter
N C I Goushleff
Tye Arbuckle
Donald Cole
Mark Raizenne
Author Affiliation
Canadian Network of Toxicology Centres and Department of Environmental Biology, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada. Iritter@uoguelph.ca
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health B Crit Rev. 2006 Nov-Dec;9(6):441-56
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Environmental Exposure
Environmental Pollutants - toxicity
Humans
Pesticides - toxicity
Public Health
Public Policy
Research Design
Risk assessment
Abstract
In recent years, there has been escalating concern over the possible association between exposure to pesticides and adverse human health effects by a number of non-governmental organizations, professional and public interest groups. Recognizing the need to document the scientific basis of these concerns as a foundation for initiating a research theme devoted to linkages between exposures to pesticides and human health effects, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) requested a summary of recent research trends that address these linkages. Experts across Canada in the field of pesticide regulation and research were invited to participate in the review. The review summarizes the limitations of past and current studies related to pesticides and human health effects research and makes suggestions for future research priorities and proposed study designs that will improve the assessment of pesticide exposure, the associated health risks, and improved methodology for regulatory decision making.
PubMed ID
17090482 View in PubMed
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Almost half of women with malignant mesothelioma were exposed to asbestos at home through their husbands or sons.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262972
Source
Dan Med J. 2014 Sep;61(9):A4902
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
Maja Dahl Langhoff
Maren Brøndberg Kragh-Thomsen
Sharleny Stanislaus
Ulla Møller Weinreich
Source
Dan Med J. 2014 Sep;61(9):A4902
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Asbestos - toxicity
Denmark - epidemiology
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Environmental Pollutants - toxicity
Female
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Lung Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Male
Mesothelioma - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Pleural Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Retrospective Studies
Spouses
Survival Rate
Abstract
Women often develop malignant mesothelioma (MM) without occupational asbestos exposure. Northern Jutland has a high prevalence of MM due to previously high occupational exposures to asbestos. The aim of this study was to elucidate a possible domestic exposure to asbestos through first-degree relatives in women who develop MM.
This was a retrospective study in women with MM of the pleura. A total of 30 women were diagnosed with and treated for MM in Northern Jutland from 1996 to 2012. In all, 24 women were included. Demographic data, subtype of MM, time from first hospital contact to diagnosis, survival and information on occupational and domestic exposure to asbestos were obtained from hospital records.
A total of 12.5% of the study population were primarily exposed to asbestos. 46% had domestic exposure to asbestos through their husbands or sons. The median age of the study population was 66.5 years. In all, 75% suffered from the epitheloid subtype, 12.5% from the biphasic and 8.4% from the sarcomatoid subtype. Time from first hospital contact to diagnosis was one month and the median survival time was 12 months. The 1- and 5- year-survival were 58% and 0%, respectively.
Nearly 50% of the women affected by MM have been domestically exposed to asbestos through first-degree relatives.
not relevant.
PubMed ID
25186542 View in PubMed
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Analysis of multiaberrant cells in lymphocytes of persons living in different ecological regions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59438
Source
Mutat Res. 1994 Jan-Feb;323(1-2):7-10
Publication Type
Article
Author
N P Bochkov
L D Katosova
Author Affiliation
Sechenov Moscow Medical Academy, Russia.
Source
Mutat Res. 1994 Jan-Feb;323(1-2):7-10
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Adult
Cells, Cultured
Chromosome Aberrations
Environmental Pollutants - toxicity
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Lymphocytes - drug effects - radiation effects
Male
Middle Aged
Nuclear Reactors
Occupational Exposure
Radioactive Pollutants - toxicity
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Ukraine
Abstract
An analysis was carried out of multiaberrant ("rogue") cells in lymphocytes of persons living in unpolluted areas (controls), and in areas chemically or radioactively (Chernobyl fall-out) polluted. The total number of analysed cells was 102,391, among these 10 cells with three and more aberrations were found. These multiaberrant cells occur in persons of both sexes and various ages living in regions with a moderate degree of mutagenic exposure. The main types of aberrations in multiaberrant cells were chromosome exchanges, accompanied by double fragments.
PubMed ID
7508570 View in PubMed
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Application of a yeast estrogen screen in non-biomarker species Varicorhinus barbatulus fish with two estrogen receptor subtypes to assess xenoestrogens.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165448
Source
Toxicol In Vitro. 2007 Jun;21(4):604-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2007
Author
Keng-Yen Fu
Chung-Yuan Chen
Whei-Meih Chang
Author Affiliation
Institute of Environmental Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan, ROC.
Source
Toxicol In Vitro. 2007 Jun;21(4):604-12
Date
Jun-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cloning, Molecular
Cyprinidae - physiology
Environmental Pollutants - toxicity
Estrogen Receptor alpha - drug effects - genetics - metabolism
Estrogen Receptor beta - drug effects - genetics - metabolism
Estrogens, Non-Steroidal - toxicity
Female
Humans
Ligands
Liver - drug effects - metabolism
Oncorhynchus mykiss
Receptors, Estrogen - drug effects - genetics - metabolism
Transcriptional Activation - genetics
Xenobiotics - toxicity
Yeasts - genetics - metabolism
Abstract
Xenoestrogens can interfere with normal estrogen signaling by competitively binding to the estrogen receptor (ER) and activating transcription of target genes. In this study, we cloned the estrogen receptor alpha (vbERalpha) and beta 2 (vbERbeta2) genes from liver of the indigenous Taiwanese cyprinid fish Varicorhinus barbatulus and tested the direct impact of several xenoestrogens on these ERs. Transcriptional activity of xenoestrogens was measured by the enzymatic activity of estrogen responsive element (ERE)-containing beta-galactosidase in a yeast reporter system. The xenoestrogens tested were phenol derivatives, DDT-related substances, phthalic acid esters, and polychlorinated biphenyls, with 17beta-estradiol (E2) as a subjective standard. The phenol derivatives [4-nonylphenol (4-NP), 4-t-octylphenol (4-t-OP) and bisphenol A (BPA)] exhibited significant dose-dependent responses in both ligand potency and ligand efficiency. Consistent with yeast assays using human or rainbow trout ERs, we observed a general subtype preference in that vbERalpha displayed higher relative potencies and efficiencies than vbERbeta2, although our assays induced a stronger response for xenoestrogens than did human or trout ERs. Whereas 4-NP and 4-t-OP have similar EC50 values relative to E2 for both ER subtypes, the strong estrogenic response of BPA markedly differentiates vbERalpha from vbERbeta2, suggesting possible species-specific BPA sensitivity. We report that the ameliorative yeast tool is readily applicable for indigenous wildlife studies of the bio-toxic influence of xenoestrogens with wildlife-specific estrogen receptors.
PubMed ID
17258427 View in PubMed
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Assessing health effects of environmental contaminants by molecular markers. Studies on methylmercury and polychlorinated biphenyls as examples of translational research in environmental toxicology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96998
Source
G Ital Med Lav Ergon. 2010 Jan-Mar;32(1):5-12
Publication Type
Article
Author
T. Coccini
E. Roda
D A Sarigiannis
L. Manzo
Author Affiliation
Salvatore Maugeri Foundation IRCCS, Toxicology Division, Pavia, Italy. teresa.coccini@fsm.it
Source
G Ital Med Lav Ergon. 2010 Jan-Mar;32(1):5-12
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Biological Markers
Ecotoxicology
Environmental Pollutants - toxicity
Female
Gene Expression - drug effects
Humans
Male
Methylmercury Compounds - toxicity
Monoamine Oxidase - drug effects - physiology
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - toxicity
Rats
Receptors, Muscarinic - drug effects - genetics - physiology
Translational Research
Abstract
Evaluating the human effects of combinations of neurotoxicants is extremely difficult. Parallel studies correlating exposure parameters and "surrogate" indicators of neural cell function may represent a promising strategy. Molecular markers such as cholinergic muscarinic receptors (MRs) and monoamine oxidase activity (MAO-B) are expressed not only in brain but also in peripheral blood cells. Measurements of MRs and MAO-B in these easily accessible matrices can provide valuable information on early sub-clinical effects of drugs and chemicals in the CNS. In this paper, examples of application of lymphocyte-MRs and platelet-MAO-B as surrogate markers of CNS function in humans are described. They include (i) neuroepidemiological studies examining 7-year-old members of a birth-cohort at the Faroe-Islands prenatally exposed to elevated concentrations of methylmercury (MeHg) and polychlorinated biphenyls; (ii) clinical investigations in a series of unmedicated children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). The neurochemical markers were examined in association with exposure indicators and neuropsychological tests (Faroe Islands Study) or with specific disease symptoms (ADHD children). Studies of this type have produced valuable information on subclinical responses to low/moderate perinatal exposures to MeHg and/or PCBs, and in addition further supported the applicability of these biomarkers in children with subtle neuropsychiatric disorders. Additional studies investigated the ability of MeHg and/or PCBs to modify the expression of genes codifying for the MR subtypes in rat offspring cerebellum at distinct developmental stages. The results demonstrated persistent gender- and age-related differences in MR density and their associated gene expression pathways. Studies on pathways and metabolic networks involved in developmental toxicity may contribute to elucidate the mode of action of environmental pollutant mixtures and also considerably impact on the risk assessment process.
PubMed ID
20464972 View in PubMed
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The Assessment of Mutagenicity. Health Protection Branch Mutagenicity Guidelines. Health Protection Branch Genotoxicity Committee, Department of National Health and Welfare, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222116
Source
Environ Mol Mutagen. 1993;21(1):15-37; discussion 46-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993

The association between idiopathic environmental intolerance and psychological distress, and the influence of social support and recent major life events.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135934
Source
Environ Health Prev Med. 2012 Jan;17(1):2-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
Sine Skovbjerg
Alice Rasmussen
Robert Zachariae
Lone Schmidt
Rikke Lund
Jesper Elberling
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermato-Allergology, The Danish Research Centre for Chemical Sensitivities, Copenhagen University Hospital Gentofte, Ledreborg Alle 40, 2, 2820, Gentofte, Denmark. sinsko01@geh.regionh.dk
Source
Environ Health Prev Med. 2012 Jan;17(1):2-9
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Depressive Disorder - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Environmental Pollutants - toxicity
Female
Humans
Life Change Events
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Chemical Sensitivity - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Principal Component Analysis
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Factors
Social Support
Somatoform Disorders - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Abstract
Idiopathic environmental intolerance (IEI) is a disorder characterized by non-specific symptoms attributed to common airborne chemicals. Increasing evidence points to an association between IEI and symptoms of psychological distress. However, whether other risk factors influence this association has not been clarified. The objective of this study was to examine the association between psychological distress and IEI and to determine whether the association is confounded by social support and major life events.
Data were collected by postal questionnaires; other results from the study have been published previously in this journal. The study included participants from a general population-based study who had reported symptoms of chemical sensitivities (n = 787) and two patient groups. The first patient group (n = 101) included individuals who had contacted the Danish Research Centre for Chemical Sensitivities, and the second included individuals who had been diagnosed with environmental intolerance (n = 136). Multiple, hierarchical linear regression analyses were conducted with four IEI-related domains, i.e., mucosal and CNS symptoms, chemical intolerances and social consequences, as the dependent variables, and psychological distress, social support and major life events as the independent variables.
Our study confirmed positive and statistically significant associations between psychological distress and IEI. The associations remained statistically significant after adjusting for major life events and social support.
The results suggest that the association between IEI and psychological distress cannot be explained by known risk factors. More studies, including longitudinal studies, are needed to determine the role of psychological distress in the development and course of IEI.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21431806 View in PubMed
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95 records – page 1 of 10.