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4-Nonylphenol and bisphenol A in Swedish food and exposure in Swedish nursing women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125631
Source
Environ Int. 2012 Aug;43:21-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Irina Gyllenhammar
Anders Glynn
Per Ola Darnerud
Sanna Lignell
Rob van Delft
Marie Aune
Author Affiliation
National Food Agency, P.O. Box 622, 75126 Uppsala, Sweden. irina.gyllenhammar@slv.se
Source
Environ Int. 2012 Aug;43:21-8
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Benzhydryl Compounds
Breast Feeding - statistics & numerical data
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Endocrine Disruptors - analysis - blood - metabolism
Environmental monitoring
Environmental Pollutants - analysis - blood - metabolism
Female
Food analysis
Food Contamination - statistics & numerical data
Fruit - chemistry
Humans
Maternal Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Meat - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Phenols - analysis - blood - metabolism
Sweden
Vegetables - chemistry
Young Adult
Abstract
4-Nonylphenol (NP) and bisphenol A (BPA) are phenolic substances used in high volumes by the industry. Studies on cells and in experimental animals have shown that both these compounds can be classified as estrogenic hormone disrupters. Information about the exposure of humans to NP and BPA is still scarce, especially regarding levels in human blood. The first aim of this study was to investigate possible sources of NP and BPA exposure from food, by analyzing the levels of NP and BPA from a Swedish food market basket, based on the Swedish per capita food consumption. A second aim was to investigate blood serum levels of NP and BPA, as well as NP-ethoxylates, among young women in Sweden (n=100). Moreover, associations between food consumption and blood NP and BPA levels were studied. In food, NP was to some extent found at levels above limit of quantification (LOQ 20 ng/g fresh weight) in fruits, cereal products, vegetables, and potatoes. BPA levels above LOQ (2 ng/g fresh weight) were found in fish, meats, potatoes, and dairy products. The estimated mean intakes per capita were (medium bound) 27 µg NP/day and 3.9 µg BPA/day, showing that food is a source of BPA and NP in the general Swedish population. In blood serum, free NP above limit of detection (LOD 0.5 ng/g) was detected in 46% of the study participants while detectable levels of total NP (LOD 0.8 ng/g) were observed in 43%. The corresponding percentages for BPA were 25% and 22%, respectively. The results indicate that there is a continuous source of exposure to NP and BPA that is high enough for free NP and BPA to be detected in some consumers. Among the participants with quantifiable levels of free and total NP (n=38), 85% (median, range: 38-112%) of the NP was present as free NP. For BPA 76% (49-109%) was detected as free BPA (n=15). All women had levels of ethoxylates of NP below LOD (0.1-0.7 ng/g). A significantly higher total consumption of fruits and vegetables was reported in questionnaires by participants with NP levels at or above LOD than among women with levels below LOD. This result is supporting the market basket results of relatively high NP levels in these types of food.
PubMed ID
22466019 View in PubMed
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The identification of lead ammunition as a source of lead exposure in First Nations: the use of lead isotope ratios.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158820
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2008 Apr 15;393(2-3):291-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-2008
Author
Leonard J S Tsuji
Bruce C Wainman
Ian D Martin
Celine Sutherland
Jean-Philippe Weber
Pierre Dumas
Evert Nieboer
Author Affiliation
Department of Environment and Resource Studies, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada. ljtsuji@fes.uwaterloo.ca
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2008 Apr 15;393(2-3):291-8
Date
Apr-15-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Environmental monitoring
Environmental Pollutants - analysis - blood - metabolism
Female
Firearms
Humans
Isotopes - analysis
Lead - analysis - blood - metabolism
Lichens - metabolism
Male
Ontario
Abstract
The use of lead shotshell to hunt water birds has been associated with lead-contamination in game meat. However, evidence illustrating that lead shotshell is a source of lead exposure in subsistence hunting groups cannot be deemed definitive. This study seeks to determine whether lead shotshell constitutes a source of lead exposure using lead isotope ratios. We examined stable lead isotope ratios for lichens, lead shotshell and bullets, and blood from residents of Fort Albany and Kashechewan First Nations, and the City of Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and regression analyses. ANOVA of isotope ratios for blood revealed significant differences with respect to location, but not sex. Hamilton differed from both Kashechewan and Fort Albany; however, the First Nations did not differ from each other. ANOVA of the isotope ratios for lead ammunition and lichens revealed no significant differences between lichen groups (north and south) and for the lead ammunition sources (pellets and bullets). A plot of (206)Pb/(204)Pb and (206)Pb/(207)Pb values illustrated that lichens and lead ammunition were distinct groupings and only the 95% confidence ellipse of the First Nations group overlapped that of lead ammunition. In addition, partial correlations between blood-lead levels (adjusted for age) and isotope ratios revealed significant (p
PubMed ID
18272204 View in PubMed
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Organohalogen concentrations in blood and adipose tissue of Southern Beaufort Sea polar bears.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92143
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2008 Nov 15;406(1-2):352-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-2008
Author
Bentzen T W
Muir D C G
Amstrup S C
O'Hara T M
Author Affiliation
Department of Biology and Wildlife, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, Alaska 99775, USA. fstwb@uaf.edu
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2008 Nov 15;406(1-2):352-67
Date
Nov-15-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - chemistry - metabolism
Age Factors
Animals
Blood Chemical Analysis
Dichlorodiphenyl Dichloroethylene - analysis - metabolism
Environmental monitoring
Environmental Pollutants - analysis - blood - metabolism
Female
Halogenated Diphenyl Ethers - analysis - metabolism
Hydrocarbons, Halogenated - analysis - blood - metabolism
Insecticides - analysis - blood - metabolism
Male
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - analysis - metabolism
Ursidae - blood - metabolism
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis - blood - metabolism
Abstract
We analyzed 151 organohalogen chemicals (OHCs) in whole blood and subcutaneous fat of 57 polar bears sampled along the Alaskan Beaufort Sea coast in spring, 2003. All major organochlorine pesticides, PCBs, PBDEs and their congeners were assessed. Concentrations of most OHCs continue to be lower among Southern Beaufort Sea polar bears than reported for other populations. Additionally, toxaphenes and related compounds were assessed in adipose tissue, and 8 perflourinated compounds (PFCs) were examined in blood. Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) concentrations exceeded those of any other contaminant measured in blood. SigmaChlordane concentrations were higher in females, and both SigmaPCBs and SigmaChlordane concentrations in adipose tissue decreased significantly with age. The rank order of OHC mean concentrations; SigmaPCB>Sigma10PCB>PCB153>SigmaChlordane>Oxychlordane>PCB180>SigmaHCH>beta-HCH>SigmaDDT>p,p-DDE>SigmaPBDE>HCB>Toxaphene was similar for compounds above detection limits in both fat and blood. Although correlation between OHC concentrations in blood and adipose tissue was examined, the predictability of concentrations in one matrix for the other was limited.
PubMed ID
18775556 View in PubMed
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