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3-D modeling substantiates perfluorinated theory.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82705
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2006 Feb 1;40(3):632-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1-2006
Author
Renner Rebecca
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2006 Feb 1;40(3):632-3
Date
Feb-1-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Movements
Alcohols
Arctic Regions
Environmental Pollutants - analysis
Fluorocarbons - analysis - chemistry
Industry
Manufactured Materials
Models, Theoretical
Octanoic Acids - analysis - chemistry
Notes
Comment On: Environ Sci Technol. 2006 Feb 1;40(3):924-3016509338
PubMed ID
16509290 View in PubMed
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4-Nonylphenol and bisphenol A in Swedish food and exposure in Swedish nursing women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125631
Source
Environ Int. 2012 Aug;43:21-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Irina Gyllenhammar
Anders Glynn
Per Ola Darnerud
Sanna Lignell
Rob van Delft
Marie Aune
Author Affiliation
National Food Agency, P.O. Box 622, 75126 Uppsala, Sweden. irina.gyllenhammar@slv.se
Source
Environ Int. 2012 Aug;43:21-8
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Benzhydryl Compounds
Breast Feeding - statistics & numerical data
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Endocrine Disruptors - analysis - blood - metabolism
Environmental monitoring
Environmental Pollutants - analysis - blood - metabolism
Female
Food analysis
Food Contamination - statistics & numerical data
Fruit - chemistry
Humans
Maternal Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Meat - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Phenols - analysis - blood - metabolism
Sweden
Vegetables - chemistry
Young Adult
Abstract
4-Nonylphenol (NP) and bisphenol A (BPA) are phenolic substances used in high volumes by the industry. Studies on cells and in experimental animals have shown that both these compounds can be classified as estrogenic hormone disrupters. Information about the exposure of humans to NP and BPA is still scarce, especially regarding levels in human blood. The first aim of this study was to investigate possible sources of NP and BPA exposure from food, by analyzing the levels of NP and BPA from a Swedish food market basket, based on the Swedish per capita food consumption. A second aim was to investigate blood serum levels of NP and BPA, as well as NP-ethoxylates, among young women in Sweden (n=100). Moreover, associations between food consumption and blood NP and BPA levels were studied. In food, NP was to some extent found at levels above limit of quantification (LOQ 20 ng/g fresh weight) in fruits, cereal products, vegetables, and potatoes. BPA levels above LOQ (2 ng/g fresh weight) were found in fish, meats, potatoes, and dairy products. The estimated mean intakes per capita were (medium bound) 27 µg NP/day and 3.9 µg BPA/day, showing that food is a source of BPA and NP in the general Swedish population. In blood serum, free NP above limit of detection (LOD 0.5 ng/g) was detected in 46% of the study participants while detectable levels of total NP (LOD 0.8 ng/g) were observed in 43%. The corresponding percentages for BPA were 25% and 22%, respectively. The results indicate that there is a continuous source of exposure to NP and BPA that is high enough for free NP and BPA to be detected in some consumers. Among the participants with quantifiable levels of free and total NP (n=38), 85% (median, range: 38-112%) of the NP was present as free NP. For BPA 76% (49-109%) was detected as free BPA (n=15). All women had levels of ethoxylates of NP below LOD (0.1-0.7 ng/g). A significantly higher total consumption of fruits and vegetables was reported in questionnaires by participants with NP levels at or above LOD than among women with levels below LOD. This result is supporting the market basket results of relatively high NP levels in these types of food.
PubMed ID
22466019 View in PubMed
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[About the formation of legislation in the field of chemical and biological safety of the Russian Federation].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290153
Source
Gig Sanit. 2016; 95(8):717-21
Publication Type
Journal Article
Author
E A Boyko
N N Goncharuk
A D Dashitsyrenova
N A Kostenko
O O Sinitsina
M P Shevyreva
Source
Gig Sanit. 2016; 95(8):717-21
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Environmental Monitoring - legislation & jurisprudence - methods
Environmental Pollutants - analysis
Hazardous Substances - analysis
Humans
National Health Programs - legislation & jurisprudence
Policy Making
Public Health - legislation & jurisprudence - methods
Russia
Abstract
The realization of the package of measures directed at the consecutive decrease of the negative effect of hazardous chemical and biological factors on the population and environment to the acceptable risk level stipulates the development of standard legal regulation in the field of ensuring the chemical and biological safety. For this purpose article presents substantiation and conceptual approaches to the creation of legislation in the field of the chemical and biological security of the Russian Federation within the pursued state policy. In determination of conceptual approaches, in the article there are reported: the main idea, the purpose, a subject of legal regulation, the circle of people who will be subjected to the laws, the place offuture laws in the system of current legislation, the provisions of the Constitution of the Russian Federation, the Federal backbone laws of the Russian Federation to realization of which laws are directed, there is given the general characteristic and an assessment of a condition of legal regulation in this field, results of the analysis of the information on the need for correspondence of Russian laws to provision of international treaties, concerning prohibitions of the biological and chemical weapon, safe handling with biological agents and chemicals, and also the development of uniform procedures of ensuring chemical and biological safety. The major aspect in the shaping of the legislation is the global character ofproblems of chemical and biological safety in this connection in article there is indicated the need of rapprochement of rules of law for this area with partners in economic cooperation and integration. Taking into account an orientation of future laws on the decrease in the level of the negative impact of dangerous chemical and biological factors on the population and environment, there are designated medical, social, economic and political consequences of their implementation. There are presented the proposed structure for bills: “About biological safety”, “On Chemical Safety” and “On the National collection of pathogens.
PubMed ID
29430893 View in PubMed
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Accumulation features and temporal trends of PCDDs, PCDFs and PCBs in Baikal seals (Pusa sibirica).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90631
Source
Environ Pollut. 2009 Mar;157(3):737-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Imaeda Daisuke
Kunisue Tatsuya
Ochi Yoko
Iwata Hisato
Tsydenova Oyuna
Takahashi Shin
Amano Masao
Petrov Evgeny A
Batoev Valeriy B
Tanabe Shinsuke
Author Affiliation
Center for Marine Environmental Studies (CMES), Ehime University, Bunkyo-cho 2-5, Matsuyama 790-8577, Japan.
Source
Environ Pollut. 2009 Mar;157(3):737-47
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - chemistry - metabolism
Animals
Body Burden
Ecotoxicology - methods
Environmental Pollutants - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Female
Fresh Water
Male
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Seals, Earless - metabolism
Siberia
Tetrachlorodibenzodioxin - analogs & derivatives - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Time Factors
Abstract
This study investigated the accumulation features and temporal trends of PCDD/Fs, dioxin-like PCBs (DL-PCBs) and non-dioxin-like PCBs (NDL-PCBs) in the blubber of Baikal seals collected in 1992 and 2005. DL-PCBs (480-3600ng/g) and NDL-PCBs (980-35,000ng/g) were dominant contaminants. Concentrations of PCDDs and PCBs in males were significantly higher than in females. In males, age-dependent accumulation was observed for PCDDs, mono-ortho PCBs and NDL-PCBs. PCDFs and non-ortho PCBs showed no such trends, implying that exposure of seals to these contaminants has been decreasing in recent years. No decreasing temporal trend was observed for PCDDs, mono-ortho PCBs and NDL-PCBs, suggesting that Baikal seals are still exposed to PCDDs and PCBs. TEQs of PCDDs and mono-ortho PCBs in seals collected in 2005 accounted for 62-77% of total TEQs. The TEQ levels in 40% of the specimens exceeded the threshold level for immunosuppression observed in harbor seals (209pg/g).
PubMed ID
19110354 View in PubMed
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[Actual problem of methodology and development of evidence-based health risk assessment associated with chemical exposure].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290154
Source
Gig Sanit. 2016; 95(8):711-6
Publication Type
Journal Article
Author
S M Novikov
M V Fokin
T N Unguryanu
Source
Gig Sanit. 2016; 95(8):711-6
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Environmental Exposure - prevention & control - standards
Environmental Pollutants - analysis - standards
Evidence-Based Practice
Hazardous Substances - analysis - standards
Humans
Hygiene - standards
Public Health - methods
Risk Assessment - methods - standards
Russia
Abstract
Paramount problems of the development of the assessment of population health risks associated with the chemical exposure in Russia are considered on the ground of critical analysis of reports devoted to methodological issues of the risk assessment and guidelines published since 2010. Causes of the lack in progress of risk assessment are discussed. The information of executed research revealed the significant retardation number of Russian publications devoted to the evidence-based health risk assessment compare to worldwide trend. The analysis of publications according to evidence-based health risk assessment in Russia in 1998 - 2012 demonstrated methodical problems to be leading to the underestimation of the real risk to population’s health. There are demonstrated directions in the renewal of methodology and practice of hygienic standardization on the basis of the risk assessment. The comparative analysis of values of uncertainty factors (modifying factors, conversion factors) used for extrapolation and accepted in different countries and organizations was made. The system of extrapolation coefficients of DNEL (Derive No-Effect Level) is presented. The leading principles of modern toxicology and risk assessment based on strict scientific proofs are showed. Criteria of evidence-based toxicology and risk assessment are presented.Among actual problems which demand their decision there are considered: the assessment of combined action in regulatory toxicology; expansion of spheres of the application of health risk assessment methodology; the improvement ofpreparation and certification of experts in the field of health risk assessment; need of check of dispersion models and their replacement by more modern models; the improvement of exposure assessment with taking into account the international requirements; the assessment of regional exposure factors; expansion of atmospheric air monitoring in all the large cities of Russia.
PubMed ID
29430892 View in PubMed
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Acute infections and environmental exposure to organochlorines in Inuit infants from Nunavik.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4455
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2004 Oct;112(14):1359-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2004
Author
Frédéric Dallaire
Eric Dewailly
Gina Muckle
Carole Vézina
Sandra W Jacobson
Joseph L Jacobson
Pierre Ayotte
Author Affiliation
Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Laval University, and Public Health Research Unit, CHUQ-Laval University Medical Center, 945 Wolfe Street, Sainte-Foy, Québec G1V 5B3, Canada.
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2004 Oct;112(14):1359-65
Date
Oct-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Cohort Studies
Dichlorodiphenyl Dichloroethylene - analysis - poisoning
Environmental Exposure
Environmental Pollutants - analysis - poisoning
Female
Gastrointestinal Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - microbiology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Insecticides - analysis - poisoning
Inuits
Male
Otitis Media - epidemiology - etiology
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - analysis - poisoning
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Quebec - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Respiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology - etiology
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
The Inuit population of Nunavik (Canada) is exposed to immunotoxic organochlorines (OCs) mainly through the consumption of fish and marine mammal fat. We investigated the effect of perinatal exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) on the incidence of acute infections in Inuit infants. We reviewed the medical charts of a cohort of 199 Inuit infants during the first 12 months of life and evaluated the incidence rates of upper and lower respiratory tract infections (URTI and LRTIs, respectively), otitis media, and gastrointestinal (GI) infections. Maternal plasma during delivery and infant plasma at 7 months of age were sampled and assayed for PCBs and DDE. Compared to rates for infants in the first quartile of exposure to PCBs (least exposed), adjusted rate ratios for infants in higher quartiles ranged between 1.09 and 1.32 for URTIs, 0.99 and 1.39 for otitis, 1.52 and 1.89 for GI infections, and 1.16 and 1.68 for LRTIs during the first 6 months of follow-up. For all infections combined, the rate ratios ranged from 1.17 to 1.27. The effect size was similar for DDE exposure but was lower for the full 12-month follow-up. Globally, most rate ratios were > 1.0, but few were statistically significant (p
PubMed ID
15471725 View in PubMed
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Age and seasonal variability of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in free-ranging East Greenland polar bears (Ursus maritimus).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80128
Source
Environ Pollut. 2007 Mar;146(1):166-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2007
Author
Dietz Rune
Rigét Frank F
Sonne Christian
Letcher Robert J
Backus Sean
Born Erik W
Kirkegaard Maja
Muir Derek C G
Author Affiliation
Department of Arctic Environment, National Environmental Research Institute, Frederiksborgvej 399, P.O. Box 358, DK-4000 Roskilde, Denmark. rdi@dmu.dk
Source
Environ Pollut. 2007 Mar;146(1):166-73
Date
Mar-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - chemistry
Aging - physiology
Animals
Body Burden
Environmental Exposure
Environmental Pollutants - analysis
Female
Flame Retardants - analysis
Food chain
Greenland
Male
Polybrominated Biphenyls - analysis
Seasons
Ursidae - physiology
Abstract
Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were analysed in adipose tissue from 92 East Greenland polar bears (Ursus maritimus) sampled during 1999-2001. Mean SigmaPBDE concentrations were 70 ng/g lipid weight (lw) (range: 22-192 ng/g lw) and showed no relationship with age or sex. Of the 32 analysed PBDE congeners; BDE47, BDE153, BDE99 and BDE100 dominated, and comprised 99.6% of the SigmaPBDE concentration. The SigmaPBDE concentration had a highly significant correlation with SigmaPCB, SigmaCHL, dieldrin, HCB and SigmaHCH concentrations. We found a seasonal pattern of median SigmaPBDE concentration with 1.2 to 1.8 times higher concentrations in March to July than the rest of the year. The seasonal variation also provides a clue to the seasonal exposure, bio-availability, toxic exposure and degradation. We suggest that future geographical PBDE data comparisons may not need corrections for sex or age, but such data sets should be corrected for seasonal variability, using the presented correctional trigonometric regression.
PubMed ID
17055135 View in PubMed
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Altitudinal and thermal gradients of hepatic Cyp1A gene expression in natural populations of Salmo trutta from high mountain lakes and their correlation with organohalogen loads.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98080
Source
Environ Pollut. 2010 May;158(5):1392-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Sergio Jarque
Eva Gallego
Mireia Bartrons
Jordi Catalan
Joan O Grimalt
Benjamin Piña
Author Affiliation
Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research (IDAEA-CSIC), Jordi Girona 18, 08034-Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.
Source
Environ Pollut. 2010 May;158(5):1392-8
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Altitude
Animals
Cytochrome P-450 CYP1A1 - genetics - metabolism
Environmental monitoring
Environmental Pollutants - analysis - toxicity
Fish Proteins - genetics - metabolism
Fresh Water - analysis
Gene Expression - drug effects
Hydrocarbons, Halogenated - analysis - toxicity
Liver - enzymology
Norway
Temperature
Trout - metabolism
Abstract
The biomarker of xenobiotic exposure cytochrome p450A1 (Cyp1A) was used to analyze the biological response to chemical pollution in Salmo trutta (brown trout) from nine high mountain European lakes in Norway, Tatras, Tyrol, and central Pyrenees. Hepatic Cyp1A mRNA levels correlated both with the reciprocal of absolute annual average air temperatures of the sampled lakes and with muscle concentrations of several hydrophobic organohalogen compounds (OC), including chlorinated polychlorobiphenyls (PCB), DDE, and DDT. The correlation between Cyp1A expression and OC content was observed across the whole temperature range (between -0.7 degrees C and +6.2 degrees C), but also in the absence of any thermal gradient. We concluded that airborne pollutants accumulate in high mountain lake fish at concentrations high enough to increase Cyp1A expression, among other possible effects. As geographical distribution of semi-volatile OC is strongly influenced by air temperatures, future climate modifications will potentially enhance their physiological effects in lake ecosystems.
PubMed ID
20149942 View in PubMed
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An air pollution model for use in epidemiological studies: evaluation with measured levels of nitrogen dioxide and benzene.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199269
Source
J Expo Anal Environ Epidemiol. 2000 Jan-Feb;10(1):4-14
Publication Type
Article
Author
O. Raaschou-Nielsen
O. Hertel
E. Vignati
R. Berkowicz
S S Jensen
V B Larsen
C. Lohse
J H Olsen
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society, Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Copenhagen O. ole@cancer.dk
Source
J Expo Anal Environ Epidemiol. 2000 Jan-Feb;10(1):4-14
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollution - analysis
Benzene - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Denmark
Environmental pollution - analysis
Epidemiologic Studies
Half-Life
Humans
Models, Theoretical
Nitrogen Dioxide - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Research Design
Vehicle Emissions
Abstract
The aim of the study was to evaluate the predictions derived from the Danish Operational Street Pollution Model (OSPM) when the input data are obtained by simple methods that could be used in large-scale epidemiological studies. The model calculations were thus compared with passive sampler measurements of nitrogen dioxide and benzene at 103 street locations in Copenhagen, Denmark, and at 101 locations in rural areas. Data on traffic and street configuration were collected by means of a simple registration scheme in which forms were filled out by local municipal authorities. Meteorological data were derived from routine measurements at Copenhagen airport, and data on background air pollution were based on a simple empirical model. Differences in air pollution levels between rural areas and Copenhagen and differences in nitrogen dioxide concentrations at various locations in Copenhagen were well reproduced by the OSPM. The correlation coefficients (r) between the measured and the predicted half-year average concentrations of nitrogen dioxide in Copenhagen were between 0.75 and 0.80 for various degrees of precision of the input data for the model. The results indicate that the OSPM used with the presented methods for generation of input data might be useful in assessing long-term exposure to air pollutants in epidemiological studies.
PubMed ID
10703843 View in PubMed
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An assessment of the toxicological significance of anthropogenic contaminants in Canadian arctic wildlife.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75394
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2005 Dec 1;351-352:57-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1-2005
Author
Aaron T Fisk
Cynthia A de Wit
Mark Wayland
Zou Zou Kuzyk
Neil Burgess
Robert Letcher
Birgit Braune
Ross Norstrom
Susan Polischuk Blum
Courtney Sandau
Elisabeth Lie
Hans Jørgen S Larsen
Janneche Utne Skaare
Derek C G Muir
Author Affiliation
Warnell School of Forest Resources, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-2152, USA. afisk@forestry.uga.edu
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2005 Dec 1;351-352:57-93
Date
Dec-1-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Birds
Canada
Environmental monitoring
Environmental Pollutants - analysis - toxicity
Fishes
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - analysis - toxicity
Mammals
Metals, Heavy - analysis - toxicity
Abstract
Anthropogenic contaminants have been a concern in the Canadian arctic for over 30 years due to relatively high concentrations of bioaccumulating and biomagnifying organochlorine contaminants (OCs) and toxic metals found in some arctic biota and humans. However, few studies have addressed the potential effects of these contaminants in Canadian arctic wildlife. Prior to 1997, biological effects data were minimal and insufficient at any level of biological organization. The present review summarizes recent studies on biological effects related to contaminant exposure, and compares new tissue concentration data to threshold effects levels. Weak relationships between cadmium, mercury and selenium burdens and health biomarkers in common eider ducks (Somateria mollissima borealis) in Nunavut were found but it was concluded that metals were not influencing the health of these birds. Black guillemots (Cepphus grylle) examined near PCB-contaminated Saglek Bay, Labrador, had enlarged livers, elevated EROD and liver lipid levels and reduced retinol (vitamin A) and retinyl palmitate levels, which correlated to PCB levels in the birds. Circulating levels of thyroid hormones in polar bears (Ursus maritimus) were correlated to PCB and HO-PCB plasma concentrations, but the impact at the population level is unknown. High PCB and organochlorine pesticide concentrations were found to be strongly associated with impaired humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in polar bears, implying an increased infection risk that could impact the population. In beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas), cytochromes P450 (phase I) and conjugating (phase II) enzymes have been extensively profiled (immunochemically and catalytically) in liver, demonstrating the importance of contaminants in relation to enzyme induction, metabolism and potential contaminant bioactivation and fate. Concentrations of OCs and metals in arctic terrestrial wildlife, fish and seabirds are generally below effects thresholds, with the possible exception of PCBs in burbot (Lota lota) in some Yukon lakes, Greenland shark (Somniosus microcephalus), glaucous and great black-backed gulls (Larus hyperboreus and L. marinus), and TEQs of dioxin-like chemicals in seabird eggs. PCB and DDT concentrations in several arctic marine mammal species exceed effects thresholds, although evidence of stress in these populations is lacking. There is little evidence that contaminants are having widespread effects on the health of Canadian arctic organisms, with the possible exception of polar bears. However, further research and better understanding of organohalogen exposure in arctic biota is needed considering factors such as tissue levels that exceed effects thresholds, exposure to "new" organohalogen contaminants of concern, contaminated regions, and climate change.
PubMed ID
16154621 View in PubMed
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387 records – page 1 of 39.