Skip header and navigation

Refine By

16 records – page 1 of 2.

Association of blood cadmium to the area of residence and hypertensive disease in Arctic Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3557
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1995 Jan 15;160-161:571-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-15-1995
Author
P V Luoma
S. Näyhä
L. Pyy
J. Hassi
Author Affiliation
Regional Institute of Occupational Health in Oulu, Finland.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1995 Jan 15;160-161:571-5
Date
Jan-15-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Cadmium - adverse effects - blood
Environmental Pollutants - adverse effects - blood
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Hypertension - chemically induced - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
The association of cadmium exposure with area of residence, blood pressure, and arterial hypertensive disease was examined in 230 reindeer herders in northernmost arctic Finland. Blood cadmium concentration averaged 10.0 nmol/l, and was three times higher in smokers than in nonsmokers (16.7 vs. 5.5 nmol/l). Concentrations increased from the southwestern to the northeastern area west of the Kola Peninsula, Russia, both in nonsmokers (3.1 vs. 6.8 nmol/l) and smokers (10.8 vs. 32.0 nmol/l). High cadmium levels were most common in the northeast: 32% of the values were at least 15 nmol/l, 10% at least 45 nmol/l (health-based limit of WHO), and 3% at least 90 nmol/l (the critical limit for renal damage). High cadmium concentration was associated with a rise in blood pressure; the rise was particularly pronounced in subjects with hypertensive diseases. These associations were not affected by age, body mass index, smoking, and alcohol consumption. The results suggest that cadmium exposure may have harmful health effects in arctic Finland and emphasize the importance of reducing pollution from industrial sources in the Kola Peninsula.
PubMed ID
7892586 View in PubMed
Less detail

Breast cancer risk after exposure to perfluorinated compounds in Danish women: a case-control study nested in the Danish National Birth Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271853
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2014 Nov;25(11):1439-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
Eva C Bonefeld-Jørgensen
Manhai Long
Stine Overvad Fredslund
Rossana Bossi
Jørn Olsen
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2014 Nov;25(11):1439-48
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alkanesulfonic Acids
Breast Neoplasms - blood - chemically induced - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Chromatography, Liquid
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Environmental Pollutants - adverse effects - blood
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Risk factors
Sulfonic Acids - adverse effects - blood
Surveys and Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
Animal studies have indicated that perfluoroalkylated substances (PFAS) increase mammary fibroadenomas. A recent case-control study in Greenlandic Inuit women showed an association between the PFAS serum levels and breast cancer (BC) risk. The present study evaluates the association between serum levels of PFAS in pregnant Danish women and the risk of premenopausal BC during a follow-up period of 10-15 years using prospectively collected exposure data during the pregnancy.
Questionnaire and blood samples were taken during 1996-2002 and at the end of follow-up, all 250 BC cases and 233 frequency-matched controls were chosen for further analyses. Serum levels of ten perfluorocarboxylated acids, five perfluorosulfonated acids, and one sulfonamide (perflurooctane-sulfonamide, PFOSA) were determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization in negative mode. Computer-assisted telephone interviews taken during pregnancy provided data on potential confounders.
Weak positive and negative insignificant associations were found between BC risk and levels of perfluorooctane sulfonamide (PFOSA) and perfluorohexanesulfonate (PFHxS), respectively. Grouped into quintile, the BC cases had a significant positive association with PFOSA at the highest quintiles and a negatively association for PFHxS. Sensitivity analyses excluding uncertain cases caused stronger data for PFOSA and weaker for PFHxS. No further significant associations were observed.
This study does not provide convincing evidence for a causal link between PFAS exposures and premenopausal BC risks 10-15 years later.
Notes
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1989 Mar;79(3):340-92916724
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2011 Oct;119(10):1466-7121665566
Cites: Chemosphere. 2005 Mar;58(11):1471-9615694468
Cites: Mutat Res. 2005 Nov 10;587(1-2):38-4416219484
Cites: Environ Health. 2011;10:8821978366
Cites: Int J Hyg Environ Health. 2011 Nov;214(6):493-921676652
Cites: ScientificWorldJournal. 2011;11:1963-8022125449
Cites: JAMA. 2012 Jan 25;307(4):391-722274686
Cites: Toxicology. 2012 Aug 16;298(1-3):1-1322531602
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012;71:1915522901290
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2012 Dec 4;46(23):12960-723102093
Cites: Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 2013 Jan 1;266(1):132-4223142464
Cites: Toxicology. 2013 Feb 8;304:185-9123287389
Cites: Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2013 Nov;20(11):8045-5623539207
Cites: Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2013 Nov;20(11):8031-4423764977
Cites: Toxicol Lett. 2013 Nov 25;223(2):211-2024035753
Cites: Environ Health. 2014;13(1):1924629213
Cites: Environ Health. 2013;12(1):3523597293
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2001 Apr 1;35(7):1339-4211348064
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2001 Dec;29(4):300-711775787
Cites: Toxicol Sci. 2002 Apr;66(2):244-5211896291
Cites: ScientificWorldJournal. 2001 Nov 6;1:627-912805763
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2003 Dec;111(16):1892-90114644663
Cites: Chemosphere. 2004 Mar;54(11):1599-61114675839
Cites: SAR QSAR Environ Res. 2004 Feb;15(1):69-8215113070
Cites: Regul Toxicol Pharmacol. 2004 Jun;39(3):363-8015135214
Cites: Crit Rev Toxicol. 2004 Jul-Aug;34(4):351-8415328768
Cites: Fed Proc. 1970 Sep-Oct;29(5):1699-7035457573
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2006 Jan;114(1):100-516393665
Cites: Chemosphere. 2006 Apr;63(3):490-616213555
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2006 Jun 1;40(11):3463-7316786681
Cites: Chemosphere. 2006 Aug;64(9):1582-9116403420
Cites: Toxicol Sci. 2007 Mar;96(1):133-4417132714
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2007 Feb;115(2):226-3017384769
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2007 Apr 1;41(7):2237-4217438769
Cites: Environ Int. 2007 Aug;33(6):782-817442394
Cites: Toxicol Sci. 2007 Oct;99(2):366-9417519394
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2007 Nov;115(11):1596-60218007991
Cites: Toxicology. 2007 Dec 5;242(1-3):123-917950980
Cites: Neurotoxicology. 2008 Jan;29(1):160-918063051
Cites: Toxicol Sci. 2008 Mar;102(1):3-1418003598
Cites: Eur J Cancer. 2008 Jul;44(10):1345-8918280139
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2008 Jun;116(6):716-2218560525
Cites: Hum Genet. 2008 Aug;124(1):31-4218575892
Cites: Toxicol Sci. 2009 Apr;108(2):412-819211617
Cites: Drug Chem Toxicol. 2010 Apr;33(2):131-720307141
Cites: Anal Bioanal Chem. 2010 May;397(2):439-5119862506
Cites: Mutat Res. 2010 Jul 19;700(1-2):39-4320451658
Cites: CA Cancer J Clin. 2011 Mar-Apr;61(2):69-9021296855
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2011 Oct 1;45(19):8151-921682250
Cites: J Natl Cancer Inst. 1995 Nov 15;87(22):1681-57473816
PubMed ID
25148915 View in PubMed
Less detail

Contaminants in Svalbard polar bear samples archived since 1967 and possible population level effects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6706
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2003 Jan 1;301(1-3):163-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1-2003
Author
Andrew E Derocher
Hans Wolkers
Theo Colborn
Martin Schlabach
Thor S Larsen
Øystein Wiig
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Polar Institute, N-9296 Tromso, Norway.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2003 Jan 1;301(1-3):163-74
Date
Jan-1-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Newborn
Environmental Exposure
Environmental Pollutants - adverse effects - blood
Female
Insecticides - adverse effects - blood
Male
Mortality
Norway
Polychlorinated biphenyls - adverse effects - blood
Population Dynamics
Reproduction
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Survival
Ursidae
Abstract
Blood plasma samples were collected in 1967 from 32 polar bears (Ursus maritimus) in eastern Svalbard. These samples were stored frozen until 2001 and then analyzed for 33 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), two toxaphene congeners, DDTs, chlordanes (CHL), hexachlorobenzene, hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs), and polybrominated flame retardants (biphenyls and diphenyl ethers). The 1967 pollutant levels were compared with values from 1993 to 1994 for adult females and adult males to obtain insights into the historical development of pollution in the Norwegian Arctic. Differences in the OC levels measured between 1967 and 1993-1994 ranged from a decrease (PCB 187 and p,p-DDE) to unchanged in both sexes (PCBs 105, 118, 209, and HCH) to an increase in females (PCBs 99, 128, and CHL), to increases in both sexes (PCBs 138, 153, 156, 157, 170, 180, 194, and 206). The maximum change was a nine-fold increase in PCB 157 in adult females. Changes from 1967 to 1993-1994 in contaminant pattern expressed relative to PCB 153 could be explained by a combination of selective metabolism and accumulation of organochlorines in polar bears and temporal changes in the contaminant mixture being transported to the Arctic. Harvest of polar bears in Svalbard ended in 1973 and it appears that most pollutant levels were increasing at the same time that the population was expected to recover from over-harvest. The mean age of adult females in the Svalbard population was similar to other populations where pollution levels are lower but harvest is intense. Females with cubs-of-the-year > or =16 years old are uncommon in the population for unknown reasons. The impacts of contaminants on the Svalbard polar bear population are inconclusive but there are suggestions of contaminant-related population level effects that could have resulted from reproductive impairment of females, lower survival rates of cubs, or increased mortality of reproductive females.
PubMed ID
12493194 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effects of low concentrations of organochlorine compounds in women on calcium transfer in human placental syncytiotrophoblast.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183685
Source
Toxicol Sci. 2003 Nov;76(1):182-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2003
Author
Annie Hamel
Donna Mergler
Larissa Takser
Lucie Simoneau
Julie Lafond
Author Affiliation
Laboratoire de Physiologie materno-foetale, Département des Sciences Biologiques, Université du Québec à Montréal, Canada H3C 3P8.
Source
Toxicol Sci. 2003 Nov;76(1):182-9
Date
Nov-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biological Transport - drug effects
Calcium - blood - metabolism
Environmental Pollutants - adverse effects - blood - metabolism
Female
Fetal Blood - metabolism
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - adverse effects - blood - metabolism
Maternal Exposure - adverse effects
Maternal-Fetal Exchange - drug effects
Pregnancy
Quebec
Trophoblasts - cytology - drug effects - metabolism
Abstract
For most Canadians, food represents one of the major sources of environmental contaminants. Among them, organochlorine compounds (OCs) are known to affect calcium (Ca2+) homeostasis. They are neurotoxic by perturbation of Ca2+ channels and pumps, and they interfere with protein kinase C (PKC) and Ca2+ binding protein (CaBP). Ca2+ is an essential element to adequate fetal growth and development. The aim of the present study is to determine the relation between low environmental maternal exposure to OCs, such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB 153), Aroclor 1260, p,p'-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and p,p'-dichlorodiphenyl-dichloroethane (DDE), Ca2+ levels in serum and placenta, placental Ca2+ transfer, and newborn development. Total Ca2+ and OCs were measured in women's serum samples, as well as in umbilical cord's serum and placenta at term. Placentas were taken for trophoblast cells isolation and Ca2+ incorporation kinetic experiments. Our results were obtained from 30 pregnant women from the southwestern area of Quebec. Concentrations of Aroclor 1260, PCB 153, DDE, and DDT were respectively 6.1, 6.0, 3.1, and 2.9 times lower in the umbilical cord serum than in the mother's serum at term. In the placenta, DDE was accumulated at higher levels than other contaminants. A tendency towards an inverse relation was observed for in OCs found in three compartments and Ca2+ levels in maternal serum and in placental tissues. Maternal Ca2+ concentrations do not influence Ca2+ uptake by syncytiotrophoblast. Only DDE (>/=0.70 mug/l) in maternal serum significantly was associated with a small increase in Ca2+ uptake by syncytiotrophoblast. This study will help us determine if low OC contamination significantly modifies Ca2+ transfer in syncytiotrophoblast.
PubMed ID
12970576 View in PubMed
Less detail

High blood levels of persistent organic pollutants are statistically correlated with smoking.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3492
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 1999 Jul;58(3):214-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1999
Author
B. Deutch
J C Hansen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, Aarhus University, Denmark.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 1999 Jul;58(3):214-9
Date
Jul-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Environmental Pollutants - adverse effects - blood
Female
Fetal Blood - chemistry
Greenland
Health Surveys
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Inuits
Linear Models
Logistic Models
Maternal-Fetal Exchange
Metals, Heavy - blood
Multivariate Analysis
Pesticides - analysis - blood
Pregnancy
Risk assessment
Sampling Studies
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
Persistent Organic Pollutants (11 pesticides and 14 PCB-congeners), and heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Hg, Pb, Se, and Zn) were determined in 175 pregnant women and 160 newborn infants (umbilical cord blood) from Disko Bay, Greenland, 1994-96. Among these, 135 women filled out questionnaires about drinking, smoking and intake of traditional Inuit food. Multiple linear regression analyses showed highly significant positive associations between the mothers' smoking status (never, previous, present) and plasma concentrations of all the studied organic pollutants both in maternal blood and umbilical cord blood. Traditional food and not the tobacco is known to be the source of the contaminants. But smoking may influence the enzymatic turnover of toxic substances.
PubMed ID
10528472 View in PubMed
Less detail

Levels of perfluoroalkyl substances and risk of coronary heart disease: Findings from a population-based longitudinal study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269537
Source
Environ Res. 2015 Oct;142:148-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2015
Author
Kristina Mattsson
Anna Rignell-Hydbom
Sara Holmberg
Anders Thelin
Bo A G Jönsson
Christian H Lindh
Andréa Sehlstedt
Lars Rylander
Source
Environ Res. 2015 Oct;142:148-54
Date
Oct-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Coronary Disease - blood - chemically induced - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Environmental Pollutants - adverse effects - blood
Fluorocarbons - adverse effects - blood
Humans
Limit of Detection
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Cross-sectional studies have shown an association between exposure to perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) and coronary heart disease (CHD). These findings need to be evaluated in longitudinal settings.
To investigate the risk of CHD in relation to PFAS levels in a longitudinal setting among Swedish rural residents.
In a population-based prospective cohort of male farmers and rural residents recruited in 1990-1991, all men who received a CHD diagnosis between 1992 and 2009 were identified from national registers (n=253). For each CHD case, one control, matched for age, was chosen randomly from the cohort. For all cases and controls, levels of eight PFASs at baseline were measured in stored blood samples. In addition, for a subsample, PFAS levels were also measured in serum samples collected at a follow-up in 2002-2003.
There were no statistically significant associations between levels of seven of the eight PFASs at baseline and risk for developing CHD. There was a significant association between perfluoroheptanoic acid (PFHpA) and CHD (OR=2.72; 95% CI: 1.52, 4.84) for the 3rd quartile and (OR=2.45; 95% CI: 1.40, 4.29) for the 4th quartile compared to the lowest quartile. Changes in levels of PFCs between baseline and follow-up did not differ systematically between cases and controls.
This longitudinal study does not lend support to the previously reported cross-sectional relationship between PFAS levels and CHD risk. We found a significant association with PFHpA, but this could be a chance finding, considering its chemical resemblance to other PFASs.
PubMed ID
26142720 View in PubMed
Less detail

Linking exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls with fatty fish consumption and reduced fetal growth among Danish pregnant women: a cause for concern?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92402
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2008 Oct 15;168(8):958-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-15-2008
Author
Halldorsson T I
Thorsdottir I.
Meltzer H M
Nielsen F.
Olsen S F
Author Affiliation
Maternal Nutrition Group, Department of Epidemiology Research, Statens Serum Institut, Arillerivej 5, Building 206, 2300 Copenhagen, Denmark. lur@ssi.dk
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2008 Oct 15;168(8):958-65
Date
Oct-15-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark
Dietary Fats
Environmental Pollutants - adverse effects - blood
Female
Fetal Development
Fetal Growth Retardation - etiology
Food Contamination
Humans
Polychlorinated biphenyls - adverse effects - blood
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Seafood - adverse effects
Abstract
In a selected group of women from the Danish National Birth Cohort, the authors investigated the association between intake of fatty fish and plasma concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) on the one hand and the association between maternal PCB concentrations and fetal growth on the other. Of 70,183 women who filled in a food frequency questionnaire during 1996-2002, 100 nulliparous women aged 25-35 years with normal prepregnancy body mass index were selected according to their intake of fatty fish (low (0 meals/month, n = 34), medium (1-3 meals/month, n = 33), or high (> or = meals/month, n = 33)). Women with a high intake of fatty fish had 50% (95% confidence interval (CI): 31, 72) higher plasma PCB concentrations than women with low intake. Maternal plasma PCB concentrations were inversely associated with birth weight and placental weight. The adjusted mean difference between the 75th and 25th PCB percentiles was -155 g (95% CI: -291, -19) for birth weight and -81 g (95% CI: -135, -26) for placental weight. These results support previous findings from this cohort, where fatty fish intake was inversely associated with fetal growth. Dietary recommendations often encourage weekly consumption of fatty fish. These results suggest that potential exposure to PCBs should be carefully considered before recommending such intakes among women of childbearing age.
PubMed ID
18718897 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Organochlorine compounds and breast cancer--is there a connection between environmental pollution and breast cancer?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20539
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2000 Feb 14;162(7):922-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-14-2000
Author
A P Høyer
P. Grandjean
T. Jørgensen
J W Brock
H B Hartvig
Author Affiliation
H:S Kommunehospitalet, Hovedstadens Center for Prospektive Befolkningsstudier. APH@post8.tele.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2000 Feb 14;162(7):922-6
Date
Feb-14-2000
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Neoplasms - chemically induced
Case-Control Studies
Denmark
English Abstract
Environmental Pollutants - adverse effects - blood
Estrogens - adverse effects - metabolism - pharmacology
Female
Humans
Insecticides - adverse effects - blood
Life Style
Polychlorinated biphenyls - adverse effects - blood
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Some organochlorine compounds may have weak oestrogenic effects and are therefore suspected of increasing the risk of breast cancer. The risk of breast cancer was assessed prospectively in relation to the serum concentration of several organochlorines. In all 240 women, who developed breast cancer between 1976 and 1993 were together with 477 breast cancer-free controls enrolled in a cohort-nested case-control study. The serum dieldrin concentration was associated with a significantly increased dose-related risk of breast cancer (Odds Ratio 2.05; 95% confidence interval 1.17-3.57; p for trend 0.01). There was no overall association between risk of breast cancer and DDT or polychlorinated biphenyls. The results support the hypothesis that exposure to oestrogenic organochlorines may increase the risk of breast cancer.
PubMed ID
10740433 View in PubMed
Less detail

Organochlorine exposures influence on breast cancer risk and survival according to estrogen receptor status: a Danish cohort-nested case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19599
Source
BMC Cancer. 2001;1:8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
A P Høyer
T. Jørgensen
F. Rank
P. Grandjean
Author Affiliation
The Copenhagen Center for Prospective Population Studies, Harsdorffsvej 1B, 2tv, DK-1874 Frederiksberg C, Denmark. aph@post8.tele.dk
Source
BMC Cancer. 2001;1:8
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Breast Neoplasms - blood - chemically induced - mortality
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Denmark
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Environmental Pollutants - adverse effects - blood
Female
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated
Insecticides - adverse effects - blood
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Receptors, Estrogen - physiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk factors
Survival Analysis
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The relationship between breast cancer and organochlorine exposure is controversial and complex. As estrogen receptor positive and negative breast cancer may represent different entities of the disease, this study was undertaken to evaluate organochlorines influence on breast cancer risk and survival according to receptor status. METHODS: The background material stems from the Copenhagen City Heart Study (Denmark 1976-78). The breast cancer risk was investigated in a cohort nested case-control design including 161 cases and twice as many breast cancer free controls. The cases served as a cohort in the survival analysis. Serum organochlorine concentrations were determined by gaschromotography. RESULTS: The observed increased breast cancer risk associated with exposure to dieldrin derived from women who developed an estrogen receptor negative (ERN) tumor (Odds ratio [OR] I vs. IV quartile, 7.6, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.4-46.1, p-value for linear trend 0.01). Tumors in women with the highest dieldrin serum level were larger and more often spread at the time of diagnosis than ERP tumors. The risk of dying was for the remaining evaluated compounds higher among patients with ERP breast cancer when compared to those with ERN. In the highest quartile of polychlorinated biphenyls (SigmaPCB) it was more than 2-fold increased (Relative risk [RR] I vs. IV quartile, 2.5, 95% CI 1.1-5.7), but no dose-response relation was apparent. CONCLUSION: The results do not suggest that exposure to potential estrogenic organochlorines leads to development of an ERP breast cancer. A possible adverse effect on prognosis of hormone-responsive breast cancers needs to be clarified.
PubMed ID
11518544 View in PubMed
Less detail

16 records – page 1 of 2.