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Ambient carbon monoxide may influence heart rate variability in subjects with coronary artery disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177018
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2004 Dec;46(12):1217-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
Author
Robert Dales
Author Affiliation
HECSB/SEP/ECB/AHED/AQHER, Ottawa, Health Canada Air Quality-Health Effects Research Section, Health Canada, 275 Slater Street, 7th Floor, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0L2. rdales@ohri.ca
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2004 Dec;46(12):1217-21
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - therapeutic use
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angina Pectoris - drug therapy - epidemiology
Carbon Monoxide - analysis - toxicity
Comorbidity
Coronary Artery Disease - drug therapy - epidemiology - physiopathology
Environmental Exposure - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Environmental Monitoring - statistics & numerical data
Epidemiological Monitoring
Female
Heart Rate - drug effects
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Abstract
Days of high ambient carbon dioxide (CO) have been associated with increased hospital admissions for cardiac disease. This study was conducted to determine if daily concentrations of CO and fine particulates (PM2.5) are associated with daily changes in heart rate variability.
Each of 36 adults with coronary artery disease had personal exposure to PM2.5 and CO measured along with heart rate variability for one 24-hour period each week for up to 10 weeks.
Among those not taking beta-receptor blockers, there was a positive association between the standard deviation of the R-to-R intervals and CO (P = 0.02). No effect was found for PM2.5.
Urban exposure to CO may exert a biologic effect on the heart, which may be modified by medications.
PubMed ID
15591973 View in PubMed
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Assessment of the impact of ambient air pollutants on health in Helsinki, Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216236
Source
World Health Stat Q. 1995;48(2):126-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
A. Pönkä
Author Affiliation
Helsinki City Centre for the Environment, Finland.
Source
World Health Stat Q. 1995;48(2):126-31
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Air Pollutants - adverse effects - analysis
Air Pollution - statistics & numerical data
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Data Collection
Environmental Monitoring - statistics & numerical data
Epidemiological Monitoring
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Surveys
Humans
Humidity
Incidence
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Reproducibility of Results
Respiratory Tract Diseases - epidemiology
Risk
Seasons
Temperature
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Several studies from various countries within the last decade have shown that ambient air pollutants cause short-term health effects in lower concentrations than believed earlier. Obtaining reliable and comprehensive health and environmental data is difficult but is the basic prerequisite for these studies. Linkage of data on air pollution and on several health effects has been conducted in Helsinki since the late 1980s, using time series analysis. The uniform population, small socioeconomic differences, a practically free national health care system with high coverage and extensive health, pollution and meteorological data render such studies possible. These kinds of local studies are necessary because many confounders or modifiers cause problems for the generalization of results of studies from other locations. Internal standardization, recommendations and guidelines concerning the methodology of linkage studies are needed to save work and money and to ensure the reliability of results.
PubMed ID
8585230 View in PubMed
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The association of type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance/secretion with persistent organic pollutants in two First Nations communities in northern Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114198
Source
Diabetes Metab. 2013 Dec;39(6):497-504
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
S. Pal
J M Blais
M A Robidoux
F. Haman
E. Krümmel
T A Seabert
P. Imbeault
Author Affiliation
Department of Biology, University of Ottawa, 30, Marie Curie, K1N 6N5 Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Diabetes Metab. 2013 Dec;39(6):497-504
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Causality
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - ethnology
Environmental Monitoring - statistics & numerical data
Environmental pollutants - blood
Female
Food Contamination - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Insulin - secretion
Insulin Resistance - ethnology
Male
Mercury - blood
Obesity - ethnology
Ontario - epidemiology
Pesticides - blood
Sex Distribution
Abstract
Recent evidence suggests an association between persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and type 2 diabetes. In two First Nations communities where wild food is consumed by a large portion of the population, we compared pollutants in plasma between diabetic and non-diabetic individuals, and investigated the strength of association between pollutants and insulin resistance/secretion in non-diabetic individuals.
The study population consisted of 72 participants. Oral Glucose Tolerance Tests were used to assess diabetes status. Plasma was used to determine POP concentrations and mercury concentrations were determined from hair samples.
Age-adjusted plasma concentrations of some pollutants were significantly higher in diabetic than in non-diabetic individuals. When taking into account age, adiposity levels, and smoking status, POP levels were not associated with insulin resistance nor with insulin secretion in non-diabetic individuals.
These findings confirm that POP concentrations in plasma may be higher in diabetic than in non-diabetic individuals. No association was however seen between POP concentrations and markers of insulin resistance/secretion in non-diabetic individuals.
PubMed ID
23639570 View in PubMed
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Associations between atmospheric concentrations of spores and emergency department visits for asthma among children living in Montreal.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138359
Source
Arch Environ Occup Health. 2010 Oct-Dec;65(4):201-10
Publication Type
Article
Author
Marie Raphoz
Mark S Goldberg
Michelle Garneau
Léa Héguy
Marie-France Valois
Frédéric Guay
Author Affiliation
Department of Geography, Universite du Quebec a Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Arch Environ Occup Health. 2010 Oct-Dec;65(4):201-10
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Microbiology
Air Pollution - adverse effects
Asthma - epidemiology - etiology
Basidiomycota
Child
Child, Preschool
Cladosporium
Emergency Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Environmental Monitoring - statistics & numerical data
Epidemiological Monitoring
Ganoderma
Humans
Infant
Inhalation Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Mitosporic Fungi
Poisson Distribution
Quebec - epidemiology
Risk factors
Spores, Fungal
Abstract
The authors carried out a time-series study to determine whether short-term increases in the concentrations of spores were associated with emergency department visits from asthma among children 0 to 9 years of age in Montreal, 1994-2004. Concentrations of spores were obtained from one sampling monitor. The authors used parametric Poisson models to model the association between daily admissions to emergency rooms for asthma and ambient exposures to a variety of spores, adjusting for secular trends, changes in weather, and chemical pollutants. For first admissions and exposures to Basidiomycetes, the authors found positive associations at all lags but the concurrent day. For Deuteromycetes and Cladosporium, risks were positive starting at lag 3 days and diminished at lag 6 days. There was little evidence of associations for readmissions, except for Basidiomycetes. The results indicate that Basidiomycetes and Cladosporium spores may be implicated in the exacerbation of asthma among children, most notably in the case of first-time visits to emergency departments, and that the effects appear to be delayed by several days.
PubMed ID
21186425 View in PubMed
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Basic physiological biomarkers in adult female perch (Perca fluviatilis) in a chronically polluted gradient in the Stockholm recipient (Sweden).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81120
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2006;53(8-9):437-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Linderoth Maria
Hansson Tomas
Liewenborg Birgitta
Sundberg Henrik
Noaksson Erik
Hanson Marsha
Zebühr Yngve
Balk Lennart
Author Affiliation
Department of Applied Environmental Science, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden. maria.linderoth@itm.su.se
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2006;53(8-9):437-50
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Animals
Biological Markers - analysis
Body Weight
DDT - analysis - toxicity
Environmental Monitoring - statistics & numerical data
Female
Fresh Water - chemistry
Gonads - physiology
Lipid Metabolism
Organ Size
Perches - growth & development - metabolism
Sexual Maturation - drug effects
Sweden
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis - toxicity
Abstract
By measuring a battery of basic physiological biomarkers and the concentration of SigmaDDT in adult female perch (Perca fluviatilis), an assumed aquatic pollution gradient was confirmed, with the city of Stockholm (Sweden) as a point source of anthropogenic substances. The investigation included an upstream gradient, westwards through Lake M?laren (46 km), and a downstream gradient, eastwards through the Stockholm archipelago (84 km). The results indicated a severe pollution situation in central Stockholm, with poor health status of the perch: retarded growth, increased frequency of sexually immature females, low gonadosomatic index, and disturbed visceral fat metabolism. SigmaDDT, measured as a pollution indicator, was 10-28 times higher than the background in perch from the Baltic Proper. Besides the main gradient other sources of pollution also influenced the response pattern of the measured biomarkers. In particular, there were strong indications of pollution coming from the Baltic Sea.
PubMed ID
16904705 View in PubMed
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Biochemical biomarkers in adult female perch (Perca fluviatilis) in a chronically polluted gradient in the Stockholm recipient (Sweden).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82029
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2006;53(8-9):451-68
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Hansson Tomas
Schiedek Doris
Lehtonen Kari K
Vuorinen Pekka J
Liewenborg Birgitta
Noaksson Erik
Tjärnlund Ulla
Hanson Marsha
Balk Lennart
Author Affiliation
Department of Applied Environmental Science, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden. tomas.hansson@itm.su.se
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2006;53(8-9):451-68
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetylcholinesterase - analysis
Analysis of Variance
Animals
Biological Markers - analysis
Cytochrome P-450 CYP1A1 - analysis
DNA Adducts - analysis
Environmental Monitoring - statistics & numerical data
Female
Fresh Water - chemistry
Glutathione Transferase - analysis
Liver - metabolism - pathology
Metallothionein - analysis
Muscle, Skeletal - metabolism
Perches - anatomy & histology - metabolism
Polychlorinated biphenyls - analysis
Seasons
Sweden
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis - toxicity
Abstract
A battery of biochemical biomarkers and the SigmaPCB concentration in adult female perch (Perca fluviatilis) verified an aquatic pollution gradient with the city of Stockholm (Sweden) as a point source of anthropogenic substances. The investigation included both an upstream gradient, 46 km westwards through Lake M?laren, and a downstream gradient, 84 km eastwards through the Stockholm archipelago. Besides the main gradient from Stockholm, there were strong indications of pollution coming from the Baltic Sea. The results indicated a severe pollution situation in central Stockholm, with poor health status of the perch, characterised by increased specific EROD activity in the liver, increased liver EROD somatic index, decreased AChE activity in the muscle, increased amount of DNA adducts in the liver, and a high concentration of biliary 1-pyrenol. In addition, laboratory exposure to common EROD inducers elicited an abnormal response, suggestive of chronic intoxication.
PubMed ID
16750226 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cadmium and mercury exposure over time in Swedish children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282343
Source
Environ Res. 2016 Oct;150:600-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2016
Author
T. Lundh
A. Axmon
S. Skerfving
K. Broberg
Source
Environ Res. 2016 Oct;150:600-5
Date
Oct-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cadmium - blood
Child
Child, Preschool
Environmental Monitoring - statistics & numerical data
Environmental pollutants - blood
Female
Humans
Male
Mercury - blood
Sweden
Abstract
Knowledge about changes in exposure to toxic metals over time remains very sparse, in particular for children, the most vulnerable group. Here, we assessed whether a reduction in environmental pollution with cadmium (Cd) and mercury (Hg) caused a change in exposure over time. In total, 1257 children (age 4-9) in two towns in Sweden were sampled once in 1986-2013. Blood concentrations of Cd (b-Cd; n=1120) and Hg (b-Hg; n=560) were determined.
The median b-Cd was 0.10 (geometric mean 0.10; range 0.010-0.61) ?g/L and b-Hg was 0.91 (geometric mean 0.83; range 0.021-8.2) ?g/L. Children living close to a smelter had higher b-Cd and b-Hg than those in urban and rural areas. There was no sex difference in b-Cd or b-Hg, and b-Cd and b-Hg showed no significant accumulation by age. b-Cd decreased only slightly (0.7% per year, p
PubMed ID
26922260 View in PubMed
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[Characterization of Vibrio cholerae cultures isolated in foci of cholera in the city of Kazan].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187184
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2002 Nov-Dec;(6):78-80
Publication Type
Article
Author
V B Ziatdinov
Author Affiliation
State Medical University, Kazan, Russia.
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2002 Nov-Dec;(6):78-80
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bacterial Typing Techniques
Carrier State - epidemiology - microbiology
Cholera - epidemiology - microbiology
Disease Outbreaks - statistics & numerical data
Disease Reservoirs
Environmental Microbiology
Environmental Monitoring - statistics & numerical data
Epidemiological Monitoring
Humans
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Retrospective Studies
Russia - epidemiology
Vibrio cholerae - genetics - isolation & purification
Water Microbiology
Abstract
During the period of the registered outbreak of cholera in 2001 in Kazan 171 V. cholerae cultures were isolated in the focus of the infection (from patients, carriers and 7 environmental objects). The use of the basic and additional tests, including the polymerase chain reaction, made it possible to establish the circulation of V. cholerae, phagovar 15, in the focus of the infection. The strain isolated from the water reservoir Azino-1 in Kazan was identical in its properties to the epidemically dangerous strains isolated from patients. On the whole, the data obtained in the identification of the strains showed that the cultures isolated from patients, vibrio-carriers and environmental objects were identical.
PubMed ID
12506636 View in PubMed
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Controlling for potential confounding by occupational exposures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183756
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2003 Aug 22-Oct 10;66(16-19):1591-603
Publication Type
Article
Author
Jack Siemiatycki
Daniel Krewski
Yuanli Shi
Mark S Goldberg
Louise Nadon
Ramzan Lakhani
Author Affiliation
Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. j.siemiatycki@umontreal.ca
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2003 Aug 22-Oct 10;66(16-19):1591-603
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Canada
Carcinogens - analysis
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Environmental Monitoring - statistics & numerical data
Epidemiological Monitoring
Female
Heart Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Humans
Lung Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Lung Neoplasms - chemically induced
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - mortality
Occupational Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Occupations - classification
Proportional Hazards Models
Research Design
Risk assessment
Sex Factors
Terminology as Topic
United States
Abstract
Occupational exposure is an important potential confounder in air pollution studies because it is plausible that individuals who live in highly polluted areas also work in more polluted environments. While the original investigators made some efforts to control for possible confounding by occupational variables, it was felt that these could be improved upon. The reanalysis team attempted to control for occupational confounding by supplementing the original data sets with two new variables, an indicator of the "dirtiness" of a subject's job and an indicator of possible exposure to occupational lung carcinogens. The attribution of these variables was based on the job title recorded by the original investigators and on the judgment of our experts concerning typical exposure patterns in different occupations. We fitted Cox proportional-hazards models identical to those that had been used by the original investigators while also including one or both of the new occupational covariates in the models. In none of the analyses did the inclusion of the occupational variables materially change the results. It would therefore appear that, in general, the results reported by the original investigators were not distorted by inadequate control of occupational variables. We also carried out some analyses using the dirtiness index as a stratification variable to assess effect modification. There was some indication, albeit inconsistent, that the effect of air pollution on mortality was greater among subjects with dirty jobs than among those with clean jobs.
PubMed ID
12959831 View in PubMed
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66 records – page 1 of 7.