Skip header and navigation

Refine By

11 records – page 1 of 2.

[2 Montreal physicians of the 19th century adept at ecologic thought].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature109629
Source
Union Med Can. 1970 Mar;99(3):487-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1970
Author
E. Desjardins
Source
Union Med Can. 1970 Mar;99(3):487-92
Date
Mar-1970
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Environmental Health - history
History, 19th Century
Humans
Quebec
PubMed ID
4908614 View in PubMed
Less detail

[An ecological theme in the play "Enemy of the people" by H. Ibsen]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49321
Source
Cas Lek Cesk. 1992 Aug 14;131(15):473-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-14-1992

Disease ecology at a crossroads: man-made environments, human rights and perpetual development utopias.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211204
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1996 Sep;43(5):745-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1996
Author
D. Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1996 Sep;43(5):745-58
Date
Sep-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cultural Evolution
Ecology
Environmental Health - history
History, 15th Century
History, 16th Century
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
History, Ancient
Human Rights
Humans
Models, Theoretical
Social Medicine - history
Abstract
There is a growing body of critical literature on health, development and environmental sustainability in a world of finite resources and overburdened ecosystems. The ethics of progress and perpetual development in pursuit of unlimited economic growth and ever-expanding markets are no longer viable, given the constraints imposed on the life-support systems of the biosphere and a finite resource base, which poses the most serious threat to life on Earth. Despite increasing evidence of the linkages between economic growth and environmental deterioration and a rhetoric expressed in a growing body of laws, regulations, accords and global "agendas" at the national and international level, there are all too few success stories in reversing or even slowing down the current trends of ecosystem degradation and decreasing cultural and biological diversity. On the contrary, there is evidence that environmental stress and deterioration are increasing, and the impact on the mental, physical and social health and well-being of populations is more significant now than in any previous time in history. The fragmentation of countries, the rise of nationalism and ethnic conflict, the decimation of indigenous nations and human rights abuses are often closely interrelated with environmental degradation and development initiatives. This paper reviews some of the concepts and underlying values of the main "models" developed by health and social scientists for interpreting this reality, with the aim of stimulating debate that could lead to the adoption of a larger and more comprehensive framework for analysing the interactions between human health, development and environmental change.
PubMed ID
8870139 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Environmental health and industrial pollution in the 1890s]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49194
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Dec 10;121(30):3561-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-10-2001
Author
A. Storesund
F. Rønning
Author Affiliation
Institutt for allmenn- og samfunnsmedisin Universitetet i Oslo Postboks 1130 Blindern 0318 Oslo. asbjorn.storesund@hit.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Dec 10;121(30):3561-5
Date
Dec-10-2001
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chemical Industry - history
English Abstract
Environmental Health - history
Environmental Pollutants - adverse effects - history
Environmental Pollution - adverse effects - history - prevention & control
History, 19th Century
Humans
Industrial Waste - adverse effects - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control
Mining - history
Norway
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Pollution from industry assumed new dimensions when large-scale industry and mining were established in Norway towards the end of the nineteenth century. The present article discusses how the local health administration responded to the first extensive industrial pollution of air and water. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Two chemical factories producing wood pulp and one abandoned nickel mine are studied by means of information from court records and municipal archives. RESULTS: New forms of large quantity pollutants and their great spreading capacity were not anticipated in the Health Act of 1860. The legislation at the time had ambiguous points which made it difficult to apply in cases of industrial pollution. One major problem was reliable documentation of adverse health effects. INTERPRETATION: Neither central nor local medical authorities had adequate competence to exert the professional influence required. In spite of this, local health commissions acted with considerable authority in the early 1890s. Within a few years, however, the health aspects were down-played because of the strong economic and political interests behind the new industries. The principal difficulties emerging in the 1890s with industrial pollution eventually lasted for nearly one hundred years.
PubMed ID
11808018 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Health Commission's activity and public health work in Skien and Langesund 1861-1900]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49232
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1999 Mar 20;119(8):1106-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-20-1999
Author
A. Storesund
Author Affiliation
Institutt for allmennmedisin og samfunnsmedisinske fag Universitetet i Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1999 Mar 20;119(8):1106-11
Date
Mar-20-1999
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Communicable Disease Control - history
English Abstract
Environmental Health - history
Health education
Health Promotion - history
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Legislation, Medical - history
Norway
Preventive Health Services - history
Public Health - history
Abstract
The role played by the health commissions in preventive health work in a major and a minor urban community in Telemark, Skien and Langesund respectively, is analysed by means of a classification method applicable to cases and decisions referred to in the proceedings of the health commissions. Increasingly, health commissions had to rely on their own initiative under the leadership of the district medical officer. After 1890, the decisions reached by the health commissions were increasingly recommendations to local authorities. Sanitation and waste processing were the principal problems. Regular house-to-house inspections in Langesund appear to have become effective, while the problems in Skien presumably were too great to permit similar improvements there. Even though practical work of preventing the spread of epidemic diseases had to remain the doctors' responsibility, the health commissions were active in providing the necessary resources. However, the commissions did not play a leading role in developing improved drinking water supplies or other major issues essential to health. Neither did they engage to any considerable extent in the distribution of public health information. On the other hand, the commissions acted as a controlling authority in cases brought before them, thus fulfilling the intentions of the Health Act of 1860.
PubMed ID
10228413 View in PubMed
Less detail

[In memory of Professor V.A. Pul'kis]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49522
Source
Gig Sanit. 1970 Sep;35(9):119
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1970
Source
Gig Sanit. 1970 Sep;35(9):119
Date
Sep-1970
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Environmental Health - history
History, 20th Century
Public Health - history
Siberia
PubMed ID
4927157 View in PubMed
Less detail

[On the 70th birthday of Professor D. N. Kaliuzhnyi]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49523
Source
Gig Sanit. 1970 Sep;35(9):109-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1970
Source
Gig Sanit. 1970 Sep;35(9):109-10
Date
Sep-1970
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Environmental Health - history
History, 20th Century
Public Health - history
Ukraine
PubMed ID
4927156 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Some results of work in the area of health in industrial establishments in the Tul'skii district in connection with the 10th anniversary celebration of "Health Day"].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature111825
Source
Zdravookhr Ross Fed. 1966 Jul;10(7):3-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1966

[The outer environment--now and then]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49221
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1999 Dec 10;119(30):4540-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-10-1999
Author
E. Dybing
Author Affiliation
Avdeling for miljømedisin, Statens institutt for folkehelse, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1999 Dec 10;119(30):4540-3
Date
Dec-10-1999
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollution - history
Air Pollution, Indoor - history
English Abstract
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Environmental Health - history - trends
Environmental Pollutants - history
History, 20th Century
Humans
Norway
Soil Pollutants - history
Water Pollution - history
Abstract
Hazardous environmental factors in Norway have changed considerably over the last decades, often for the better. During the last five-year period, water-works serving 800,000 Norwegians have been renovated. The earlier high levels of sulphur dioxide and lead in urban air are now very low, whereas suspended particulate matter and nitrogen oxides continue to be at levels which can induce adverse health effects. Radon and tobacco smoke are now important indoor contaminants. Moisture-induced damage in dwellings may lead to health problems; the extent of such damage is, however, not known. A number of fjords are still contaminated with metals, PAH (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons), PCB (polychlorinated biphenyls) and dioxins, even though industrial discharge to water and air has been greatly reduced. Body burdens of DDT, PCB and dioxins have been markedly lowered over time. There is a continuous increase in the use of chemicals, though the chemicals are better tested and controlled than before. The total volume of pesticides used has fallen over the last three decades. There are no clear changes over the last 15 to 20 years in perceived noise exposure.
PubMed ID
10827500 View in PubMed
Less detail

11 records – page 1 of 2.