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Adiposity and glycemic control in children exposed to perfluorinated compounds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104801
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2014 Apr;99(4):E608-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Clara Amalie G Timmermann
Laura I Rossing
Anders Grøntved
Mathias Ried-Larsen
Christine Dalgård
Lars B Andersen
Philippe Grandjean
Flemming Nielsen
Kira D Svendsen
Thomas Scheike
Tina K Jensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Medicine, Institute of Public Health (C.A.G.T., L.I.R., C.D., P.G., F.N., T.K.J.), and Institute of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics (A.G., M.R.-L., L.B.A.), University of Southern Denmark, 5000 Odense C, Denmark; and Department of Biostatistics (K.D.S., T.S.), University of Copenhagen, 1353 Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2014 Apr;99(4):E608-14
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiposity - drug effects - physiology
Alkanesulfonic Acids - blood
Blood Glucose - drug effects - metabolism
Body mass index
Caprylates - blood
Child
Denmark - epidemiology
Environmental Exposure - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Environmental Pollutants - blood - toxicity
Female
Fluorocarbons - blood - toxicity
Humans
Insulin Resistance
Male
Obesity - blood - epidemiology
Skinfold thickness
Abstract
Our objective was to explore whether childhood exposure to perfluorinated and polyfluorinated compounds (PFCs), widely used stain- and grease-repellent chemicals, is associated with adiposity and markers of glycemic control.
Body mass index, skinfold thickness, waist circumference, leptin, adiponectin, insulin, glucose, and triglyceride concentrations were assessed in 8- to 10-year-old children in 1997 in a subset of the European Youth Heart Study, Danish component. Plasma PFC concentrations were available from 499 children. Linear regression models were performed to determine the association between PFC exposure and indicators of adiposity and markers of glycemic control.
There was no association between PFC exposures and adiposity or markers of glycemic control in normal-weight children. Among overweight children, an increase of 10 ng perfluorooctane sulfonic acid/mL plasma was associated with 16.2% (95% confidence interval [CI], 5.2%-28.3%) higher insulin concentration, 12.0% (95% CI, 2.4%-22.4%) higher ß-cell activity, 17.6% (95% CI, 5.8%-30.8%) higher insulin resistance, and 8.6% (95% CI, 1.2%-16.5%) higher triglyceride concentrations, and an increase of 10 ng perfluorooctanoic acid/mL plasma was associated with 71.6% (95% CI, 2.4%-187.5%) higher insulin concentration, 67.5% (95% CI, 5.5%-166.0%) higher ß-cell function, 73.9% (95% CI, 0.2%-202.0%) higher insulin resistance, and 76.2% (95% CI, 22.8%-153.0%) higher triglyceride concentrations.
Increased PFC exposure in overweight 8- to 10-year-old children was associated with higher insulin and triglyceride concentrations. Chance findings may explain some of our results, and due to the cross-sectional design, reverse causation cannot be excluded. The findings therefore need to be confirmed in longitudinal studies.
PubMed ID
24606078 View in PubMed
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Airborne manganese particulates and methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl (MMT) at selected outdoor sites in Montreal.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201701
Source
Neurotoxicology. 1999 Apr-Jun;20(2-3):151-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
J. Zayed
C. Thibault
L. Gareau
G. Kennedy
Author Affiliation
Département de médecine du travail et d'hygiène du milieu, Faculté de médecine, Montréal, Québec, Canada. zayedj@erc.umontreal.ca
Source
Neurotoxicology. 1999 Apr-Jun;20(2-3):151-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis
Canada
Environmental Exposure - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Manganese - analysis
Organometallic Compounds - analysis
Sampling Studies
Abstract
This study aims to assess the atmospheric concentrations of methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl (MMT), respirable manganese (MNR) and total manganese (MnT) in certain specific microenvironments and to provide an estimation of human exposure to MnR. Sampling was carried out in five microenvironments: a gas station, an underground car park, downtown Montreal, near an expressway and near an oil refinery. The samples were collected using Gil-Air portable pumps during three days and were analyzed by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). The mean concentrations of MnR, MnT and MMT were 0.036 microgram m-3, 0.103 microgram m-3 and 0.005 microgram m-3 respectively. The MnR/MnT ratios vary from 25% to 43% (mean 35%) while the MMT/MnT ratios averaged about 5%. Furthermore, the mean concentration of the MnR measured near the expressway (0.053 microgram m-3) is similar to the United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) reference concentration (RfC = 0.05 microgram m-3). The average daily environmental exposure dose to MNR is estimated at 0.010 microgram kg-1 d-1 and its contribution to the multimedia exposure (air, food and water) is low. The overall results show a lack of potential exposure to MMT and substantial concentrations of MnR near an expressway.
PubMed ID
10385879 View in PubMed
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Ambient carbon monoxide may influence heart rate variability in subjects with coronary artery disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177018
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2004 Dec;46(12):1217-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
Author
Robert Dales
Author Affiliation
HECSB/SEP/ECB/AHED/AQHER, Ottawa, Health Canada Air Quality-Health Effects Research Section, Health Canada, 275 Slater Street, 7th Floor, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0L2. rdales@ohri.ca
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2004 Dec;46(12):1217-21
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - therapeutic use
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angina Pectoris - drug therapy - epidemiology
Carbon Monoxide - analysis - toxicity
Comorbidity
Coronary Artery Disease - drug therapy - epidemiology - physiopathology
Environmental Exposure - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Environmental Monitoring - statistics & numerical data
Epidemiological Monitoring
Female
Heart Rate - drug effects
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Abstract
Days of high ambient carbon dioxide (CO) have been associated with increased hospital admissions for cardiac disease. This study was conducted to determine if daily concentrations of CO and fine particulates (PM2.5) are associated with daily changes in heart rate variability.
Each of 36 adults with coronary artery disease had personal exposure to PM2.5 and CO measured along with heart rate variability for one 24-hour period each week for up to 10 weeks.
Among those not taking beta-receptor blockers, there was a positive association between the standard deviation of the R-to-R intervals and CO (P = 0.02). No effect was found for PM2.5.
Urban exposure to CO may exert a biologic effect on the heart, which may be modified by medications.
PubMed ID
15591973 View in PubMed
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Ambient volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in communities of the Athabasca oil sands region: Sources and screening health risk assessment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292075
Source
Environ Pollut. 2018 Apr; 235:602-614
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2018
Author
Md Aynul Bari
Warren B Kindzierski
Author Affiliation
School of Public Health, University of Alberta, 3-57 South Academic Building, 11405-87 Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 1C9 Canada. Electronic address: mdaynul@ualberta.ca.
Source
Environ Pollut. 2018 Apr; 235:602-614
Date
Apr-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis
Air Pollution - statistics & numerical data
Alberta
Environmental Exposure - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Environmental monitoring
Humans
Oil and Gas Fields
Risk assessment
Volatile Organic Compounds - analysis
Xylenes
Abstract
An investigation of ambient levels and sources of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and associated public health risks was carried out at two northern Alberta oil sands communities (Fort McKay and Fort McMurray located?30?km from oil sands development, respectively) for the period January 2010-March 2015. Levels of total detected VOCs were comparatively similar at both communities (Fort McKay: geometric mean?=?22.8?µg/m3, interquartile range, IQR?=?13.8-41?µg/m3); (Fort McMurray: geometric mean?=?23.3?µg/m3, IQR?=?12.0-41?µg/m3). In general, methanol (24%-50%), alkanes (26%-32%) and acetaldehyde (23%-30%) were the predominant VOCs followed by acetone (20%-24%) and aromatics (~9%). Mean and maximum ambient concentrations of selected hazardous VOCs were compared to health risk screening criteria used by United States regulatory agencies. The Positive matrix factorization (PMF) model was used to identify and apportion VOC sources at Fort McKay and Fort McMurray. Five sources were identified at Fort McKay, where four sources (oil sands fugitives, liquid/unburned fuel, ethylbenzene/xylene-rich and petroleum processing) were oil sands related emissions and contributed to 70% of total VOCs. At Fort McMurray six sources were identified, where local sources other than oil sands development were also observed. Contribution of aged air mass/regional transport including biomass burning emissions was ~30% of total VOCs at both communities. Source-specific carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic risk values were also calculated and were below acceptable and safe levels of risk, except for aged air mass/regional transport (at both communities), and ethylbenzene/xylene-rich (only at Fort McMurray).
PubMed ID
29331893 View in PubMed
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An examination of traditional foods and cigarette smoking as cadmium sources among the nine First Nations of Eeyou Istchee, Northern Quebec, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104372
Source
Environ Sci Process Impacts. 2014 May 28;16(6):1422-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-28-2014
Author
Nadia A Charania
Leonard J S Tsuji
Ian D Martin
Eric N Liberda
Suzanne Coté
Pierre Ayotte
Eric Dewailly
Evert Nieboer
Author Affiliation
Environment and Resource Studies, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada.
Source
Environ Sci Process Impacts. 2014 May 28;16(6):1422-33
Date
May-28-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cadmium - blood
Child
Environmental Exposure - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Environmental monitoring
Environmental pollutants - blood
Food Contamination - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Middle Aged
Quebec - epidemiology
Smoking - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Cadmium (Cd), a nonessential toxic metal present in the environment, accumulates in the organs of herbivorous mammals which typically are consumed by Aboriginal populations. The relative contribution of this potential exposure source to concentrations of blood Cd was investigated in 1429 participants (age >7 years) residing in the nine Cree First Nations communities of Eeyou Istchee, northern Quebec, Canada. Analysis of variance identified significant Cd concentration differences between communities, sex, and age groups, although these were complicated by significant 2-way interactions. The percentage of participants with Cd concentrations within the adopted health-based guideline categories of 'acceptable', 'concern' and 'action' pertaining to kidney damage was 56.2%, 38.3%, and 5.5%, respectively. Partial correlations (controlling for age as a continuous variable) did not show a significant association between consumption of traditional foods and Cd concentrations (r = 0.014, df = 105, p = 0.883). A significant and positive partial correlation (r = 0.390, df = 105, p
PubMed ID
24781002 View in PubMed
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An investigation of the co-variation in circulating levels of a large number of environmental contaminants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123494
Source
J Expo Sci Environ Epidemiol. 2012 Sep;22(5):476-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Erik Lampa
Lars Lind
Anna Bornefalk Hermansson
Samira Salihovic
Bert van Bavel
P Monica Lind
Author Affiliation
Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. erik.lampa@medsci.uu.se
Source
J Expo Sci Environ Epidemiol. 2012 Sep;22(5):476-82
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Benzhydryl Compounds
Biological Markers - blood
Child
Chlorine Compounds - blood
Cluster analysis
Environmental Exposure - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Environmental pollutants - blood
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Pesticides - blood
Phenols - blood
Phthalic Acids - blood
Polychlorinated biphenyls - blood
Principal Component Analysis
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
United States - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
We are daily exposed to many different environmental contaminants. Mixtures of these contaminants could act together to induce more pronounced effects than the sum of the individual contaminants. To evaluate the effects of such mixtures, it is of importance to assess the co-variance amongst the contaminants. Thirty-seven environmental contaminants representing different classes were measured in blood samples from 1016 individuals aged 70 years. Hierarchical cluster analysis and principal component analysis were used to assess the co-variation among the contaminants. Within each identified cluster, possible marker contaminants were sought for. We validated our findings using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2003-2004 study. Two large clusters could be identified, one representing low/medium chlorinated polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) (=6 chlorine atoms), as well as two pesticides and one representing medium/high chlorinated PCBs (=6 chlorine atoms). PCBs 118 and 153 could be used as markers for the low/medium chlorinated cluster and PCBs 170 and 209 could be used as markers for the medium/high chlorinated cluster. This pattern was similar to data from the NHANES study. Apart from the PCBs, little co-variation was seen among the contaminants. Thus, a large number of chemicals have to be measured to adequately identify mixtures of environmental contaminants.
PubMed ID
22692364 View in PubMed
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The annual effective dose from natural sources of ionising radiation in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181012
Source
Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 2004;108(3):215-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
R L Grasty
J R LaMarre
Author Affiliation
Gamma-Bob Inc., 3924 Shirley Avenue, Ottawa, Ontario K1V 1H4, Canada. grasty@rogers.com
Source
Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 2004;108(3):215-26
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Background Radiation
Body Burden
Canada - epidemiology
Environmental Exposure - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Environmental Monitoring - methods - statistics & numerical data
Epidemiological Monitoring
Geography - methods
Humans
Radiation Dosage
Radiation Protection - methods
Radiation, Ionizing
Radiometry - methods - statistics & numerical data
Radon - analysis
Relative Biological Effectiveness
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Time Factors
Abstract
A review and analysis of published information combined with the results of recent gamma ray surveys were used to determine the annual effective dose to Canadians from natural sources of radiation. The dose due to external radiation was determined from ground gamma ray surveys carried out in the cities of Toronto, Ottawa, Montreal and Winnipeg and was calculated to be 219 microSv. A compilation of airborne gamma ray data from Canada and the United States shows that there are large variations in external radiation with the highest annual outdoor level of 1424 microSv being found in northern Canada. The annual effective inhalation dose of 926 microSv from 222Rn and 220Rn was calculated from approximately 14,000 measurements across Canada. This value includes a contribution of 128 microSv from 222Rn in the outdoor air together with 6 microSv from long-lived uranium and thorium series radionuclides in dust particles. Based on published information, the annual effective dose due to internal radioactivity is 306 microSv. A program developed by the Federal Aviation Administration was used to calculate a population-weighted annual effective dose from cosmic radiation of 318 microSv. The total population-weighted average annual effective dose to Canadians from all sources of natural background radiation was calculated to be 1769 microSv but varies significantly from city to city, largely due to differences in the inhalation dose from 222Rn.
PubMed ID
15031443 View in PubMed
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Assessment of current exposure of the population living in the Techa River basin from radioactive releases of the Mayak facility.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165656
Source
Health Phys. 2007 Feb;92(2):134-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2007
Author
Mikhail I Balonov
Gennady Y Bruk
Vladislav Y Golikov
Anatoly N Barkovsky
Eleonora M Kravtsova
Olga S Kravtosova
Akhat A Mubasarov
Vladimir N Shutov
Irena G Travnikova
Brenda J Howard
Justin Emrys Brown
Per Strand
Author Affiliation
Institute of Radiation Hygiene (IRH), St. Petersburg, Russia.
Source
Health Phys. 2007 Feb;92(2):134-47
Date
Feb-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body Burden
Cesium Radioisotopes - analysis
Environmental Exposure - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Nuclear Reactors
Nuclear Warfare
Radiation Monitoring - statistics & numerical data
Radioactive Pollutants - analysis
Relative Biological Effectiveness
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Rivers
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Russia - epidemiology
Soil Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Strontium Radioisotopes - analysis
Water Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Abstract
Current doses arising from external and internal pathways have been estimated for the residents of two villages, Muslumovo and Brodokalmak, alongside the Techa River, which was contaminated by radioactive releases from the Mayak production facility. The dose estimates are based on numerous environmental measurements supplemented by further human whole body measurements and studies on occupational and dietary habits of Slavic and Turkish ethnic groups. Estimated doses arise mainly from use of the contaminated floodplains alongside the Techa River. The current average annual effective dose attributable to Cs and Sr in the environment, under conditions where restrictions on some river-related activities are in place, may exceed the Russian national action level of 1 mSv only in the hypothetical critical group of herdsmen in Muslumovo. The dose to this critical group in Brodokalmak is assessed to be 3 times less than that in Muslumovo and 2 fold below the action level. The external and internal exposures give comparable contributions to the total dose in both settlements and population groups: 47% and 53% in Muslumovo and 40% and 60% in Brodokalmak, respectively. About one quarter to one half of the internal dose in adults arises from the intake of Sr. In order to avoid substantial increases in the dose received by Muslumovo residents, it is expedient to prolong the current policy of restriction of some river-related population activities in this village.
PubMed ID
17220715 View in PubMed
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Assessment of the levels of hexachlorocyclohexane in blood samples from Mexico.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125380
Source
Bull Environ Contam Toxicol. 2012 Jun;88(6):833-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Antonio Trejo-Acevedo
Norma Edith Rivero-Pérez
Rogelio Flores-Ramirez
Sandra Teresa Orta-García
Lucia Guadalupe Pruneda-Álvarez
Iván N Pérez-Maldonado
Author Affiliation
Departamento Toxicología Ambiental, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Avenida Venustiano Carranza No. 2405, Col Lomas los Filtros, 78210, San Luis Potosi, SLP, Mexico.
Source
Bull Environ Contam Toxicol. 2012 Jun;88(6):833-7
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Environmental Exposure - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Environmental pollutants - blood
Female
Humans
Lindane - blood
Male
Mexico
Pesticides - blood
Abstract
The aim of this study was to evaluate hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) exposure in children living in nine hot spots in four Mexican states. We analyzed HCH (a, ß, and ?-isomers) in blood using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. HCH exposure level in 261 children was assessed and approximately 75 % of the children studied had detectable levels of HCH. These levels ranged from 188 to 40,096.7 ng/g lipid. The highest mean levels were found in Lacanja (5,446.9 ng/g lipid), an indigenous community in Chiapas, Mexico. Our data indicate high exposure to HCH in children living in these communities.
PubMed ID
22487962 View in PubMed
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Association of Lithium in Drinking Water With the Incidence of Dementia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286257
Source
JAMA Psychiatry. 2017 Oct 01;74(10):1005-1010
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-01-2017
Author
Lars Vedel Kessing
Thomas Alexander Gerds
Nikoline Nygård Knudsen
Lisbeth Flindt Jørgensen
Søren Munch Kristiansen
Denitza Voutchkova
Vibeke Ernstsen
Jörg Schullehner
Birgitte Hansen
Per Kragh Andersen
Annette Kjær Ersbøll
Source
JAMA Psychiatry. 2017 Oct 01;74(10):1005-1010
Date
Oct-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Dementia - diagnosis - epidemiology
Dementia, Vascular - diagnosis - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Drinking Water - analysis
Environmental Exposure - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Incidence
Lithium - analysis
Male
Statistics as Topic
Time
Abstract
Results from animal and human studies suggest that lithium in therapeutic doses may improve learning and memory and modify the risk of developing dementia. Additional preliminary studies suggest that subtherapeutic levels, including microlevels of lithium, may influence human cognition.
To investigate whether the incidence of dementia in the general population covaries with long-term exposure to microlevels of lithium in drinking water.
This Danish nationwide, population-based, nested case-control study examined longitudinal, individual geographic data on municipality of residence and data from drinking water measurements combined with time-specific data from all patients aged 50 to 90 years with a hospital contact with a diagnosis of dementia from January 1, 1970, through December 31, 2013, and 10 age- and sex-matched control individuals from the Danish population. The mean lithium exposure in drinking water since 1986 was estimated for all study individuals. Data analysis was performed from January 1, 1995, through December 31, 2013.
A diagnosis of dementia in a hospital inpatient or outpatient contact. Diagnoses of Alzheimer disease and vascular dementia were secondary outcome measures. In primary analyses, distribution of lithium exposure was compared between patients with dementia and controls.
A total of 73?731 patients with dementia and 733?653 controls (median age, 80.3 years; interquartile range, 74.9-84.6 years; 44 760 female [60.7%] and 28 971 male [39.3%]) were included in the study. Lithium exposure was statistically significantly different between patients with a diagnosis of dementia (median, 11.5 µg/L; interquartile range, 6.5-14.9 µg/L) and controls (median, 12.2 µg/L; interquartile range, 7.3-16.0 µg/L; P?
PubMed ID
28832877 View in PubMed
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67 records – page 1 of 7.