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Allergen sensitization and allergen exposure in Greenlander Inuit residing in Denmark and Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188475
Source
Respir Med. 2002 Sep;96(9):736-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2002
Author
C. Porsbjerg
M L Linstow
S C Nepper-christensen
A. Rasmussen
J. Korsgaard
H. Nolte
V. Backer
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, Bispebjerg University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. porsbjerg@dadlnet.dk
Source
Respir Med. 2002 Sep;96(9):736-44
Date
Sep-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Allergens - immunology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Dust
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Female
Greenland - ethnology
Humans
Hypersensitivity - ethnology - immunology
Inuits
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Pollen
Prevalence
Residence Characteristics
Skin Tests - methods
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of allergic sensitization and possible risk factors in a genetically homogenous Inuit population living under widely differing climatic and cultural conditions. A written questionnaire and skin prick test for 10 aeroallergens were obtained from 1119 adult Greenlanders residing in Denmark, Nuuk (main city in Southern Greenland) and Uummannaq (rural settlement in Northern Greenland). Allergen exposure was assessed by pollen counts, questions on pet keeping and counts of house dust mites in dust samples. The overall prevalence of at least one positive skin prick test was 22.8% in Denmark, 10.6% in Nuuk, and 6.4% in Uummannaq. In Denmark, the total birch pollen counts were 40-1000 times higher compared to Nuuk, whereas the grass pollen count was 13-30 times higher in Denmark compared to Nuuk. Dogs were held indoor with a similar frequency in Denmark and Nuuk, but much less frequently in Uummannaq. In Denmark, house dust mites were found in 72% of house holds (>10/0.1 g dust). Less than 15% of households in Greenland had measurable levels of house dust mites. The prevalence of sensitization to aeroallergens in Inuit Greenlanders differed significantly between Denmark, Nuuk and Uummannaq. These findings correlated with the observed differences in population allergen exposure in the three regions. Furthermore, differences in lifestyle factors such as educational level, stress and ethnic self-identification seemed to be associated with the risk of allergic sensitization in Greenland.
PubMed ID
12243321 View in PubMed
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An ecological study of industry in a high-risk region of multiple sclerosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130644
Source
J Neurol Sci. 2011 Dec 15;311(1-2):50-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-15-2011
Author
Inger Boström
Anne-Marie Landtblom
Klaus Lauer
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Clincal and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience, Linköping, University, Linköping, Sweden. inger.bostrom@kristinehamn.se
Source
J Neurol Sci. 2011 Dec 15;311(1-2):50-7
Date
Dec-15-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Epidemiological Monitoring
Female
Hazardous Substances - adverse effects
Humans
Industrial Waste - adverse effects
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Prevalence
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The county of Värmland, Sweden, has shown a high frequency of multiple sclerosis in several investigations. It has been presented in three studies; a period prevalence study in 1925-1934, a mortality study during 1952-1992 and a prevalence investigation in 2002. The aim of this study was to investigate the pattern of industry in this high-risk area for multiple sclerosis. The three investigations were correlated with industry in 1913 and in the 1950s, all analyzed by the Kruskall-Wallis test. Select industries from wood-pulp, paper and iron/mechanical sectors were tested also in whole Sweden. The Spearman rank correlation was used for these data and forestry data in Värmland. In Värmland, industrial data from 1913 revealed that large sawmills were associated with the period prevalence in 1925-1934 and there was a possible correlation with the prevalence for 2002. Wood-pulp factories showed a possible association with the prevalence 1925-1934 and the mortality 1952-1992. Some industries in the 1950s were correlated with the prevalence 2002. Wood and paper industries in Sweden 1913 showed an association with the MS mortality 1952-1992. In summary, data on MS prevalence in Värmland and mortality both in Värmland and all Sweden from the past 100 years suggest an association with wood-related industries in 1913 and in the 1950s, whereas no consistent association was found for other industries.
PubMed ID
21982618 View in PubMed
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[Approaches to assessing the human risk of mutagens].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166698
Source
Gig Sanit. 2006 Sep-Oct;(5):23-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
V S Zhurkov
L P Sycheva
Iu A Revazova
S M Novikova
Source
Gig Sanit. 2006 Sep-Oct;(5):23-4
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Environmental Illness - chemically induced - epidemiology
Humans
Mutagens - adverse effects
Prevalence
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
The assessment of the human risk of mutagens is a constituent of the general assessment of the risk of environment-pollutant chemicals to the population's health. An algorithm of assessing the risk of mutagens is proposed. Stage 1 (hazard identification) is to provide an expert analytical characterization of the mutagenic potential of the chemicals polluting the study object. Stage 2 (hazard characterization) is to analyze the quantitative dependences of the effect of mutagens in gametes and somatic cells of man and mammals. Stage 3 (effect evaluation) is to characterize the sources of pollution and the doses of mutagens affecting the population. Stage 4 (risk characterization) is to calculate the risk of mutagens to the population and individuals.
PubMed ID
17087204 View in PubMed
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Association studies in asthma genetics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15432
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2001 Dec 1;164(11):2014-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1-2001

Asthma among secondary schoolchildren in relation to the school environment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15766
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 1997 Nov;27(11):1270-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1997
Author
G. Smedje
D. Norbäck
C. Edling
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 1997 Nov;27(11):1270-8
Date
Nov-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Asthma - epidemiology - etiology
Comparative Study
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Male
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Schools
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Poor indoor air quality has been suggested to be related to the increase in the prevalence of asthma that has occurred in the western world, especially among children and young persons. Apart from the home, school is the most important indoor environment for children. OBJECTIVES: The aims were to study the prevalence of current asthma among secondary pupils and its relationship to the school environment, but also to personal factors and domestic exposures. METHODS: Data on asthmatic symptoms, other health aspects, and domestic exposures were gathered using a questionnaire which was sent to 762 pupils in the seventh form (13-14 years old) in 11 randomly chosen schools in the county of Uppsala in Sweden. Pupils answering 'yes' to having had asthma diagnosed by a physician, and having had recent asthma attacks, or who used asthma medication were defined as having current asthma. Data on exposures at school were gathered by measurements in 28 classrooms. The relationship between asthma and exposures was analysed by multiple logistic regression. RESULTS: The questionnaire was completed by 627 (82%). Current asthma was found among 40 pupils (6.4%). Current asthma was more common in those who had an atopic disposition, or food allergy, or who had attended a day care centre for several years. Controlling for these factors, current asthma was related to several factors in the school environment. There were more pupils with current asthma in schools that were larger, had more open shelves, lower room temperature, higher relative air humidity, higher concentrations of formaldehyde or other volatile organic compounds, viable moulds or bacteria or more cat allergen in the settled dust. CONCLUSIONS: Although the pupils attended school for a minor part of their time, our study indicates that the quality of the school environment is of importance and may affect asthmatic symptoms.
PubMed ID
9420130 View in PubMed
Less detail

Asthma: epidemiology, etiology and risk factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148568
Source
CMAJ. 2009 Oct 27;181(9):E181-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-27-2009
Author
Padmaja Subbarao
Piush J Mandhane
Malcolm R Sears
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatric Respirology, Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont.
Source
CMAJ. 2009 Oct 27;181(9):E181-90
Date
Oct-27-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Asthma - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Ontario - epidemiology
Prevalence
Recurrence
Respiratory Function Tests
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Distribution
Smoking - adverse effects
Young Adult
Notes
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Comment In: CMAJ. 2009 Oct 27;181(9):616; author reply 61619858270
PubMed ID
19752106 View in PubMed
Less detail

Atopic and non-atopic asthma in a farming and a general population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15135
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2004 Oct;46(4):396-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2004
Author
Wijnand Eduard
Ernst Omenaas
Per Sigvald Bakke
Jeroen Douwes
Dick Heederik
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Occupational Health, Oslo, Norway. Winjuad.Eduard@stami.no
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2004 Oct;46(4):396-9
Date
Oct-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Agricultural Workers' Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - immunology
Asthma - epidemiology - etiology - immunology
Comparative Study
Dermatitis, Atopic - epidemiology - etiology - immunology
Endotoxins - immunology
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Rural Population
Spores, Fungal - immunology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: In a previous study inverse associations between asthma and exposure to fungal spores and endotoxins in atopic farmers and positive associations with the same factors in non-atopic farmers were documented. No external reference population had been included. We, therefore, compared this farming population with the general population from an adjacent region. METHODS: Random samples of a farming (n=2,106) and a rural (n=351) and urban (n=727) general population were selected. Atopy was assessed by serum IgE and asthma by questionnaires. RESULTS: The asthma prevalence was 4.0% among farmers, 5.7% in the rural, and 7.6% in the urban population. Atopy was similar (9-10%). Most asthmatics were not atopic, 67-75%. Farmers had asthma less often than the general population OR 0.52 (95% CI 0.36-0.75); both atopic (OR 0.33 (95% CI 0.15-0.69)) and non-atopic asthma (OR 0.60 (95% CI 0.39-0.93)). CONCLUSION: This may indicate a protective effect of the farm environment on asthma but a healthy worker effect may also play a role.
PubMed ID
15376208 View in PubMed
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Baseline prevalence of symptoms related to indoor environment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81362
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2006;34(4):387-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Eriksson Nils M
Stenberg Berndt G T
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology, Umeå University, Sweden. nils.eriksson@soc.umu.se
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2006;34(4):387-96
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Air Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects
Computer Terminals
Dermatitis, Occupational - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Electricity - adverse effects
Electromagnetic fields - adverse effects
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Hypersensitivity - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Sick Building Syndrome - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
AIMS: Health problems associated with indoor environments have been reported and discussed extensively during the past few decades, not least in Sweden. There is, however, great uncertainty concerning the background prevalence of the symptoms in question. The main objective of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of general, mucosal, and skin symptoms in the Swedish population. METHODS: A survey comprising 3,000 randomly selected Swedes, age 18-64, was carried out. The survey addressed 25 symptoms, principally general, mucosal, and skin symptoms. A number of other areas were covered and individual data registered at Statistics Sweden were added. The response rate was 70% (2,154 cases). RESULTS: The prevalence of symptoms in the Swedish population was found to accord with results in studies based on different kinds of samples. Women reported significantly more single symptoms, as well as sets of symptoms, than men. There was no clear connection between age and symptoms. The prevalence of symptoms was slightly lower among employees compared with non-workers. Office workers did not report symptoms related to "sick building syndrome" (SBS) more frequently than employees not working in offices. SBS symptoms, skin symptoms, and symptoms similar to those reported by individuals with "electric hypersensitivity" were significantly more prevalent among employees with extensive VDU usage. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of reported health complaints accords with that which has been found in previous studies. The background prevalence reported here can serve as a reference for further studies. The high prevalence of symptoms among individuals with extensive VDU usage gives cause for further studies.
PubMed ID
16861189 View in PubMed
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