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3539 records – page 1 of 354.

1,3-Butadiene: exposure estimation, hazard characterization, and exposure-response analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186649
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health B Crit Rev. 2003 Jan-Feb;6(1):55-83
Publication Type
Article
Author
K. Hughes
M E Meek
M. Walker
R. Beauchamp
Author Affiliation
Existing Substances Division, Environmental Health Directorate, Health Canada, Environmental Health Centre, Tunney's Pasture PL0802B1, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0L2.
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health B Crit Rev. 2003 Jan-Feb;6(1):55-83
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Butadienes - metabolism - toxicity
Canada - epidemiology
Carcinogens, Environmental - toxicity
Environmental Exposure
Hazardous Substances - toxicity
Humans
Mutagens - toxicity
Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Risk assessment
Abstract
1,3-Butadiene has been assessed as a Priority Substance under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act. The general population in Canada is exposed to 1,3-butadiene primarily through ambient air. Inhaled 1,3-butadiene is carcinogenic in both mice and rats, inducing tumors at multiple sites at all concentrations tested in all identified studies. In addition, 1,3-butadiene is genotoxic in both somatic and germ cells of rodents. It also induces adverse effects in the reproductive organs of female mice at relatively low concentrations. The greater sensitivity in mice than in rats to induction of these effects by 1,3-butadiene is likely related to species differences in metabolism to active epoxide metabolites. Exposure to 1,3-butadiene in the occupational environment has been associated with the induction of leukemia; there is also some limited evidence that 1,3-butadiene is genotoxic in exposed workers. Therefore, in view of the weight of evidence of available epidemiological and toxicological data, 1,3-butadiene is considered highly likely to be carcinogenic, and likely to be genotoxic, in humans. Estimates of the potency of butadiene to induce cancer have been derived on the basis of both epidemiological investigation and bioassays in mice and rats. Potencies to induce ovarian effects have been estimated on the basis of studies in mice. Uncertainties have been delineated, and, while there are clear species differences in metabolism, estimates of potency to induce effects are considered justifiably conservative in view of the likely variability in metabolism across the population related to genetic polymorphism for enzymes for the critical metabolic pathway.
PubMed ID
12587254 View in PubMed
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2nd Nordic Toxicology Congress, NordTox-92. Symposium proceedings. Aland Islands, Finland, May 1992.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24280
Source
Pharmacogenetics. 1992 Dec;2(6):245-349
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Dec-1992
Source
Pharmacogenetics. 1992 Dec;2(6):245-349
Date
Dec-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Carcinogens, Environmental
Environmental Exposure
Humans
Neoplasms - chemically induced
PubMed ID
1363969 View in PubMed
Less detail

2nd Norwegian Environmental Toxicology Symposium: joining forces for an integrated search for environmental solutions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90204
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2009;72(3-4):111
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009

6TH NORWEGIAN ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICOLOGY SYMPOSIUM: Assessing and solving environmental challenges in a multiple stressor world.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296704
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2017; 80(16-18):805-806
Publication Type
Introductory Journal Article
Date
2017
Author
Knut Erik Tollefsen
Sam Kacew
Author Affiliation
a Section for Ecotoxicology and Risk Assessment, Norwegian Institute for Water Research (NIVA) , Oslo , Norway.
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2017; 80(16-18):805-806
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Introductory Journal Article
Keywords
Ecotoxicology
Environmental Exposure
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Environmental Pollutants - toxicity
Norway
Risk Assessment - methods
PubMed ID
28829685 View in PubMed
Less detail

7th International Symposium on Neurobehavioral Methods and Effects in Occupational and Environmental Health. 20-23 June 1999. Stockholm, Sweden. Abstracts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49214
Source
Neurotoxicology. 2000 Oct;21(5):867-910
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Oct-2000

[10 Canadian cases of angiosarcoma of the liver in vinyl chloride workers].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature249144
Source
Ann Anat Pathol (Paris). 1978;23(2):97-104
Publication Type
Article
Date
1978
Author
F. Delorme
Source
Ann Anat Pathol (Paris). 1978;23(2):97-104
Date
1978
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Environmental Exposure
Hemangiosarcoma - chemically induced - pathology
Humans
Liver - pathology
Liver Neoplasms - chemically induced - pathology
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced
Quebec
Vinyl Chloride - adverse effects
Vinyl Compounds - adverse effects
Abstract
Ten cases of angiosarcoma of the liver among vinyl chloride workers from a plant in Shawinigan, Québec, are reported. The author insist mostly on the occupational history of these workers and on the morphologic description of the lesions. A pathogenic hypothesis is submitted.
PubMed ID
567946 View in PubMed
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24-hour noise dose and risk assessment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186267
Source
Appl Occup Environ Hyg. 2003 Apr;18(4):232-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2003

137Cs concentration among children in areas contaminated with radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl accident: Mogilev and Gomel oblasts, Belarus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35663
Source
Health Phys. 1994 Sep;67(3):272-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1994
Author
M. Hoshi
Y. Shibata
S. Okajima
T. Takatsuji
S. Yamashita
H. Namba
N. Yokoyama
M. Izumi
S. Nagataki
K. Fujimura
Author Affiliation
Research Institute for Nuclear Medicine and Biology, Hiroshima University, Japan.
Source
Health Phys. 1994 Sep;67(3):272-5
Date
Sep-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Adolescent
Cesium Radioisotopes - analysis
Child
Child, Preschool
Environmental Exposure
Female
Humans
Male
Nuclear Reactors
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Ukraine
Whole-Body Counting
Abstract
The level of radiation exposure in children in Belarus caused by the Chernobyl accident was investigated on the basis of whole body 137Cs count. The subjects were 10,062 children (4,762 boys and 5,300 girls) in Mogilev and Gomel, Belarus, who received Chernobyl Sasakawa Health and Medical Cooperation Project health examinations from May 1991 to December 1992 and who were 5-16 y old at the time of examination. The median whole body 137Cs count per body weight varied from 21-48 Bq kg-1 and from 28-126 Bq kg-1 in Mogilev oblast and Gomel oblast, respectively. (The "oblast" is the largest administrative district constituting the country. Belarus consists of 6 oblasts). Corresponding annual effective dose equivalents were all less than the public dose limit of 1 mSv y-1, but the observed levels in the children were considerably higher than the average level of 2.3 Bq kg-1 reported in the past for the former Soviet Union.
Notes
Comment In: Health Phys. 1995 May;68(5):733-57730075
PubMed ID
8056594 View in PubMed
Less detail

137 Cs: seasonal patterns in native residents of three contrasting Alaskan villages.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256245
Source
Health Phys. 1971 Jun;20(6):585-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1971

3539 records – page 1 of 354.